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Full text of "Pacific Outlook (Jan.-June 1909)"

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CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY 

SACRAMENTO 



This book is due on the last date stamped 
below. Books may not be renewed. 




Vice Is More Repulsive When He Who Sins Has 



% 



rer To Do Good 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



Vol. VI. Wo. I. 



Los Jlngeles, California, January 2, 1909- 



10 Cents $2. OO a Year 



Published Every Saturday 

Lissner Building, Los Angeles, California, by the 

PACIFIC OUTLOOK COMPANY 

Subscription price $2.00 a year in advance. 

Single copies 10 cents at all news stands. 

NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERS— The Pacihc Out- 
look is mailed to subscribers through the Los 
Angeles Post Office every Friday, and should 
be delivered in every part of the city by Satur- 
day's post. If for any reason it should be de- 
layed, or be delivered in poor condition, sub- 
scribers will confer a favor upon the publishers 
by giving them immediate notice. 

Entered as lecoad.class matter April 5, 1907, at the postornce at 
Lot Angeles, ealifornia, under the act of Congress of March t. 1S79. 

The Editor of the PACIFIC Outlook cannot guarantee to return 
manuscripts .hough he trill endeavor to do so if stamps for that purpose 
are inclosed with them. If your manuscript is valuable, keep a copy of it. 



THE PACIFIC OUTLOOK'S POLICY 

The Pacific Outlook desires to state unequivo- 
cally that it is not the organ of any creed, sect, 
political party, organization, corporation or per- 
son, but is absolutely free and untrammelled in 
its associations. 

It stands unqualifiedly, and without fear, for 
that which it believes to be true, clean, honest 
and right in human affairs — political, secular, 
commercial and industrial; and in its columns 
will always maintain an unprejudiced and im- 
partial attitude in its discussion of all subjects 
of universal or local interest. 

GEORGE BAKER ANDERSON, Editor 

Just a XHougKt 

Let him who gropes painfully in dark- 
ness or uncertain light, and prays vehe- 
mently that She dawn may ripen into day, 
lay this precept well to fateart: "Do the 
duty which lies nearest to thee," which 
thou knowes'a to be a duty! Thy sec- 
ond duty will already have become clear- 
er. — Carlyle. 



COMMENT 



A HIGH PURPOSE 



COMMENTING upon Rudolph Spreck- 
els's declared intention of devoting the re- 
mainder of his life to compelling- honesty in 
public affairs, the California Weekly, the 
new state paper published in San Francisco, 
says : 

Than this no higher purpose can inspire the 
mind of any man. There is no other need com- 
parable with this. The tide of our everyday 
patriotism lias ebbed low. We have, as citizen*, 
loved our country as expressed in hills and val- 
leys, in rivers and bays and broad sweeps of plain, 
but we have been willing enough to rob its gov- 
ernment. We have loved our several State ? and 
have been jealously boastful of their material re- 
sources, but we have dodged taxation at every 
step and have loaded down official service with 
dead timber. We have so loved our cities aim 
towns that no man of us lias been known to un- 
derrate the population of the community in which 

we live, but we have given grudgingly of our time 
to public service and have not hesitated to press 

the claims of unfit friends for political jobs they 



impetenl to fill Ci immi mly In mest in 
private affairs, we have been uncommonly ilis- 

lealing with our country, State and i ity, 

If Mr. Spreckels shall devote the remainder of 
his years to rectifying this unwholesome condi- 
tion lu- will, though a patriot id' peace, deserve as 
well of posterity as any patriot that wartime may 
have produced. The evil is deep-seated and has 
been capitalized for hundreds of millions. .Mr. 
Spreckels is unlikely to prove a second Alexander 
sighing for more worlds to conquer. The task he 
lias cut out for himself will last him to the end. 

The key to the greatest of the apparent 
difficulties besetting the young San Fran- 
ciscan whose reputation has become inter- 
national may be found in one sentence from 
the California Weekly's comment: "The 
evil is deep-seated and has been capitalized 
for hundreds of millions." 

Two years ago the wealth massed in the 
path of this valiant champion of the cause 
of civic decency looked like an impregnable, 
insurmountable obstacle. But during this 
period public sentiment has been awakened 
to a point never before attained, chiefly 
through the efforts of the President of the 
United States and the graft prosecution in 
San Francisco, and the true character of the 
seeming obstacle has been determined. 
Wealth, corruptly obtained and corruptly 
employed, loses its power when attacked 
with determination by men who can see 
clearly beyond the immediate spot occupied 
and tainted by it. The seeming power of 
the millions of all the Calhouns is being dis- 
closed as weakness. Why? Because — and 
there is no other reason — it is corrupt at the 
heart; gained through corruption, used for 
corruption, steeped in corruption ; and being 
born of corruption and therefore rotten, 
against what can it stand? Against noth- 
ing, in the end, except that which is weaker, 
or more corrupt. 

This is logic. Let the Calhouns and their 
friends and supporters, including the venal 
press which defends and apologizes for their 
crimes, analyze it. Let the possibly faint- 
hearted be restored by it. 

Rudolph Spreckels will win. 
+ + t 

BE WISE, MR. MAYOR 



TO the Hon. Mayor of Los Angeles : We 
counsel prudence in the matter of the pro- 
posed second chapter of the shake-up in the 
Board of Public Works. We counseled 
prudence once before, as you will remem- 
ber, Mr. Mayor; but our words of caution 
fell on ears which might have heard had 
they not been confused by the din of politi- 



cal battle' at the doorsteps of the city hall. 
But as it was — alas! we fear thai the mys- 
terious sirenese voices which since have 
been lust were altogether too vibrant, too 
persuasive. 

But, seriously, Mr. Mayor, we believe that 
it will profit you greatly, both as a man and 
as the chief magistrate of the city of Los 
Angeles, if you will listen to the voices now 
raised in protest against the proposal to 
make Edward Kern a member of the Board 
of Public Works. There is not one good 
reason why you should thus defy what you 
must recognize as a strong public sentiment, 
and there are many good reasons why you 
should not. These reasons are known to 
you and we would not embarrass you by 
reciting them again. 

In the final analysis of that quality in 
statesmen and politicians known as valor, 
it will be found that wisdom and discretion, 
which sometimes are one, frequently out- 
weigh all other component parts. In this 
particular case the wisdom as of a serpent 
will be vastly more profitable than arro- 
gance, which here would be stupid. 

BLOW TO THE GAMBLERS 



UNLESS the gamblers should carry their 
case to the Supreme Court and that tribunal 
should find in their favor, the chances have 
become about ten to one that the Express 
has won its fight against racing tip sheets. 
According to Judge Jamison's decision 
cities have the right to prohibit the circula- 
tion of any publication, whether such pub- 
lication be sold or given away, which gives 
information or tips upon horse races or bets 
upon horse races. 

The effect of this decision will be far- 
reaching. Coming, as it does, on the eve of 
the fight for legislation prohibiting the- lay- 
ing of bets at racetracks, it will greatly en- 
courage the two anti-racetrack gambling or- 
ganizations and those co-operating with 
them in their campaign for the elimination 
of racetrack gambling in this state. All 
things appears to be working together for 
good to those that want to see the state 

purified. 

* + + 

CENTURIES OF FRAUD 



IT WAS King Solomon, we believe, or 
perhaps his ancestors, who declared that 
certain weights and measures were an 
abomination. If the wise monarch lived in 
this generation, he would use the term 
fraud, rather than abomination. 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



It was not until 1875 that a well-consid- 
ered effort was made, by government, to 
combat weights and measures in this coun- 
try. In a recent issue of Science A. L. Win- 
ton, government chemist at Chicago, points 
out the reasons for this lack of control. In 
the first place, the complexities of demand 
and of invention in producing commercial 
articles that can be successfully imitated 
have increased, and are still increasing. 
Food, drugs, paints, oils, chemicals, and 
fabrics have thus become debased. The 
primitive manufacture at home of butter, 
lard, and cheese, starch, yarn and cloths, 
has been supplanted by mills and factories; 
this reduced cost and spared the housewife, 
but deprived her of a firstihand knowledge 
of the genuineness of such products. Then, 
too, adulterants have multiplied, many of 
them being the result of the highest scienti- 
fic research. Solomon would today be 
alarmed at the long list of abominations in 
oils, acids, dyes, preservatives, and kinds of 
habit-forming drugs employed in modern 
refinements of cheating in goods. 

Before it was curbed, and because of its 
subtleties of invasion, the evil of adulter- 
ants acquired monstrous proportions. The 
Connecticut Experiment Station was estab- 
lished in 1875 for official inspection and 
analytical control of foodstuffs. Since then 
the cities of the Nation and all the civilized 
nations have built up an imperfect enginery 
of defense against the fraud of adulteration. 
The old Scriptural rage is at last intelli- 
gently directed against the sin in its new 
guises. Before long it will be as generally 
condemned and punished as is the infraction 
of the commandment against stealing. 
* * * 

ELECTRICITY FOR STEAM 



NOT long ago announcement was made 
that Mr. Harriman contemplated equipping 
the suburban steam railroads of San Fran- 
cisco — those of the Southern Pacific sys- 
tem — with electricity. It was intimated by 
one close to him that the great accomplish- 
ment of H, E. Huntington in Los Angeles 
and vicinity was chiefly responsible for Mr. 
Harriman's decision. 

To a degree little appreciated by those 
whose attention is not especially directed to 
the change, has the mode of substituting 
electricity for steam, as a motive power, 
progressed. Already the cars going in and 
out of New York City are moved by elec- 
trical power. In less than a year's time the 
passengers to New York City who now 
pour in of a morning by ferry-boats from 
the railroads whose termini are in New Jer- 
sey, will all be brought to the greater city 
by electricity. 

In a year's time four, if not six, terminal 
tubes will be in operation and the cars run- 
ning through will be moved as are those in 
the Brooklyn tubes, by electrical power. 
As a part of this revolution, the various lines 
of railroads running out into New Jersey 



will be electrified. Work of this kind is 
now being done on the Erie. 

The Pennsylvania is given less to an- 
nouncing what it proposes to do than what 
it has done. Nevertheless, there are indica-. 
tions that it has already engaged on the 
work of electrifying its system from New 
York to Pittsburg. The Central Railroad 
has been making plans for a long time which 
involve the possibility of the movement of 
all its cars, passenger and freight, between 
New York and Buffalo. 

One day, in the not far future, we shall 
all of us wake up to the appreciation that 
we are looking upon a locomotive as a relic 
of an archaic period, when soot and dirt 
was the inevitable consequence of railroad 
travel. When consumption of coal by the 
motor engine is no longer a part of railroad 
operation, more comfort and satisfaction in 
travel and more travel will be the satisfac- 
tory result. 

* * * 

ON A VOLCANO'S EDGE 



Mutiny is in the air in India. A spirit of 
unrest is evident everywhere. One high 
officer recently arrived in 'London from In- 
dia declares that the Indian government is 
in the possession of evidence showing that a 
systematic propaganda has been set on foot 
with the object of tampering with native 
troops. In official circles the idea of an- 
other mutiny on any considerable scale is 
regarded as practically impossible, but, 
nevertheless, the situation is viewed with 
considerable anxiety. 

The Anglo-Indian correspondent of the 
London Daily Mail, who speaks with inti- 
mate knowledge, recently declared : 

"The gravity of the situation is not real- 
ized in England. In India every European 
feels that he is on the edge of a volcano that 
may at any moment become active. When 
civilians go armed and European women 
are not safe without an escort, it is evident 
that race hatred has reached the high-water 
mark of danger. Yet there are some pur- 
blind officials who will not see the danger 
before their eyes — as in the case of that Gov- 
ernor of a province whose letters announc- 
ing an improvement in the situation have 
been read by friends here simultaneously 
with the cabled accounts of a second at- 
tempt on his own life." 

* * * 
CAMPHOR 



VICE-CONSUL W. H. Doyle, writing 
from Colombo, says that an early and appre- 
ciable contribution to the world's supplv of 
camphor is promised as the result of recent 
and current planting operations in Ceylon. 
In 1907 the camphor acreage of the island 
was increased from 142 to 1,106, and the in- 
dications are that the new acreage of 1908 
will be even greater. The vice-consul con- 
tinues : 

Camphor planting has been stimulated by 
the high price pf the drug, and by the suc- 



cessful results of experimental planting. 
While camphor will not grow afsea level in 
Ceylon, it finds congenial conditions in the 
mountainous parts of the island, and thrives 
finely at elevations of from 2,500 to 8,000 
feet. The situation is so favorable to its 
profitable production that enthusiastic 
planters entertain the belief that Ceylon in 
a few years will produce camphor in quan- 
tity greater than the world's present de- 
mand. It is estimated that the planting of 
between 15,000 and 20,000 acres in Ceylon 
would develop a production of 8,000,000 
pounds, which, according to most authori- 
ties, is the quantity of camphor demanded 
annually at present. 

The growing of the camphor tree in Cey- 
lon was first undertaken, in a purely sci- 
entific way, at the government experimental 
gardens at Hakgala. The experiments were 
eminently successful. Little attention was 
paid to the outcome of these experiments at 
first, as the price of camphor then ranged 
as low as $40 to $45 per hundredweight. 
But when the smokeless-powder require- 
ments of the Russo-Japanese war more than 
doubled the price, a commercial interest in 
the tree was created. Last year it was 
demonstrated beyond a doubt that camphor 
cultivation in Ceylon could be made highly 
profitable. Immediately the importation of 
seed from Japan was begun, and it has con- 
tinued to the present day. Seed and root 
cuttings from the Government gardens also 
are being used in considerable quantities. 

While the camphor tree, if permitted to 
grow, attains a height of about 40 feet, ac- 
cording to the Ceylon method of cultiva- 
tion the trees are coppiced and kept at the 
more convenient height of four to five feet. 
The first clippings are made when the trees 
are three and one-half years old and are re- 
peated at intervals of four months ; in some 
instances the trees may be clipped every 
three months. The trees are planted eight 
by four feet apart, or 1,360 to the acre. The 
results of distillations show that trees plant- 
ed and clipped as stated would yield an- 
nually about one hundred and ninety pounds 
of made camphor to the acre. 

Camphor trees may be grown success- 
fully in Southern California. Experiments 
prove this. It is strange that somebody has 
not yet undertaken to produce camphor here 
for commercial purposes. Climate and soil 
are all that are to be desired, and the market 
is close at hand. 

* * + 

CHILE CON CARNE 



By Autogenesis 
The Well-bred Girl. — Breeding is the one 
thing in our mercenary land that cannot be 
bought. No amount of money or position 
will make up for that indefinable something 
which we call being well-bred. The well- 
bred girl may be as poor as that proverbial 
meuse of churchly haunts, but no one will 
ever question her right to be called a lady, 



149218 



.i woman oi refined 

Rudeness thing; 

thai the well-bred girl never permits her- 

much she may be tempted to 

utting when people deserve it. 

•members that paying one back in one s 

coin is ill-bred ling, while 

a matter of inheritance, is more often 
due to careful training and a desire not to 

hurt The girl who is 

well bred never presumes upon her position, 

nor is she land and conspicuous in appear- 
ance or manner. The well-bred girl rarely 

' • or say things 
that make apologies necessary, and she does 
not feel apologetic f< r her environments. 
i er simple. If the truest hospitality is 
rs exactly what one has with- 
out comment, so is it also a sign of good 
breeding. To make a splurge for outsiders. 
that outsiders know to be a splurge which 
can be ill afforded, is a sign that one does 
not feel socially secure. 



Some Striking Characteristics. — The well- 
bred girl does not gossip nor carry tales nor 
talk scandal. All the other girls may do it. 
and it may seem quite harmless and amus- 
ing, but it is something that the girl of 
truly refined feelings finds revolting. If for 
no other reason, a girl should shun talk that 
she would not be willing to stand by, be- 
cause it often leads to unpleasant scenes and 
involves others in a network of disagree- 
ableness that is anything but a sign of good 
breeding. The well-bred girl is not boastful, 
aggressive nor unduly self-assertive. Above 
all she is not a toady. There is no surer 
sign of lack of breeding than to strive to 
curry favor with one who, by force of cir- 
cumstances, may have more money or in- 
fluence than you have. Gushing or disclos- 
ing one's private affairs to a scoffing world 
is anything but well-bred. A quiet, inter- 
ested, gracious manner that has its reserves 
leaves no doubt as to the claims of a girl or 
woman to good breeding. Above all, the 
well-bred girl avoids scrapes of any kind. 
She does not do things that are open to 
question, knowing that no girl can afford to 
ignore public opinion and get herself talked 
about. The well-bred girl is the self-re- 
specting girl ; she will no more permit im- 
pertinences than she would think of offer- 
ing them. She knows she is a lady, and asks 
no more than to act the part and to be treat- 
ed as a lady should be. No one ever heard 
of a girl of good breeding speak of herself 
as well-bred. It is too much a matter of 
course, as much a part of her as eyes or 
hand. 



Stcry Telling a Fine Art. — A girl who has 
her way to work through college is doing it 
by her knack of keeping children amused. 
When the question of meeting the expenses 
of her education arose the girl seemed to 
have no means of earning money, as she had 
no bent or training. One day as her small 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 

nephews hung entranced on a Fairy tale she 
was repeating the idea of story telling Foi 
profit came to her. From childhood she had 
OWer to keep children happy, no matter 
how restless. The coll,. irl attends 

is in a large city, where she had but few- 
friends. Those she had were immediate!) 
written to and their influence solicited. ( me, 
8 teacher in a large private school, intro- 
duced her to a number of the patrons, who 
were only too glad to have their little ones 
amused for an hour or so in the afternoon. 
\n< ll er friend lived in an apartment house. 
and had often been sorry for the loncU lives 
of many of the children in it after school 
hours were over. She Spoke to a number of 
mothers about the girl's project, and a StOl \ 
telling class was arranged for three after- 
noons a week. The children were collected 
in one room, and were kept happy for an 
hour and a half at a time with stories. So 
successful was the plan that other mothers 
heard of it, and the girl soon had all leisure 
hours employed. She sold only her time and 
made no attempt to collect the children or 
see that they were safely returned to their 
homes. 



Interest Must Not Be Forced. — The 

stories told were of all kinds. Many were 
tales from history. Noted bits of fiction 
were adapted to childish language. There 
were fairy tales, mythology, the child stories 
of Kipling, Seton-Thompson, Stevenson, and 
the old-time favorites of Sophie May, the 
Prudy Books, and the Gypsy Breton Series 
were told to a new generation. Much good 
poetry is now recited over and over again 
until the children grow to know and love it ; 
nor are tales of adventure and Bible stories 
omitted. There is little attempt at dis- 
cipline. The girl's theory is that the chil- 
dren must be interested, not forced into in- 
terest. Sometimes the little ones grow rest- 
less, but usually they are clamorous for 
more when the hour is through. In the 
summer the girl goes to the seashore or the 
mountains and has story-telling classes that 
keep her busy most of the day. At this sea- 
son of the year she includes many nature 
tales in her list, and the children gain in 
knowledge as well as in entertainment. 
Such an occupation requires a knack that is 
not possessed by all women. There must 
be a real love of children, besides a happy 
gift at putting things in picturesque lan- 
guage. 



Pen Names of Women Writers. — Miss 
Gregg, who is known as "Sydney C. Grier," 
chose "Sydney" because it might be inter- 
preted as either a masculine or feminine 
designation. "Grier" is a Shetland name, 
and at that time she was much interested in 
those far away isles. "C" was inserted to 
make the name look a natural surname. 
Mrs. Harrison's reason for concealment as 
"Lucas Malet" was that she "did not think 
it right to trade on the Kingslev name" lest 



she should do it discredit. She th< 
chose the "surname of her grandmother and 
great grandmother, both wome remark- 
able intelligence and character." II;.- pseud 
onym of ' I gerton," adopt 

lady now Mary (havelita Golding-Bright, 

also springs from fa ,. ,ns. I [er 

mother's name was Isabel Georgi Bynin, 
and "George Bynon" was her first disguise. 
Bui the name of Bynon had been unlucky, 
and it was quickly dropped for that of 
"Egerton," the baptismal name of her sec- 
ond husband. Under the "distinctive com- 
bination" of George Egerton she has pub- 
lished nine works since 1893. Mary Ann 
Evans called herself "George Eliot" because 
the first name was the Christian name of 
her husband, and "Eliot" was a "fine, short, 
full sounding name that matched her style 
and story." 



Soldiers More Contented. — I read in Army 
and Navy Life that there is a growing feel- 
ing of contentment and satisfaction among 
the enlisted men of the service. Within the 
past few weeks many old soldiers who had 
taken their discharge from the army after 
twenty or more years of service have re- 
enlisted, while the discharges by purchase 
have very materially decreased, having of 
late been confined almost exclusively to 
men serving in the first and second year of 
their first enlistment. The improved condi- 
tions of the service and its increased attrac- 
tiveness are illustrated as far as the army 
is concerned in the case of an old soldier 
who was drawing a pension in the city of 
Washington, and who was employed on the 
local police force, his aggregate pension be- 
ing about $60 a month. This man has re- 
enlisted. He had served about twenty-three 
years, and two enlistments with allowance 
of double time service in the tropics would 
make him eligible for retirement, and as he 
had been assured in advance of being made 
a non-commissioned officer soon after his 
new enlistment he has every reason to count 
on retirement as a sergeant or first sergeant 
within a comparatively short time on re- 
tired pay, with commutation allowances, of 
about $54 a month. 



Going the Limit. — The country cousin 
considered that he was caught beyond re- 
claim in the giddy maelstrom of metropoli- 
tan life. At dinner with his city cousin he 
had actually drunk an entire glass of beer. 
Then they had taken a taxicab and gone to 
a show. And now that it was over the city 
cousin had brazenly piloted the visitor into 
a barroom and suggested drinks. 

"No !" objected the country cousin. 

"Come on !" 

A look of diabolical wickedness spread 
over the rural features. 

"All right! I might as well go the whole 
hog. I'll have — a second glass of beer!" 



One Way to Appear Young. — A wise 
voung woman gives as her reason for having 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK. 



learned the vertical writing': "This form of 
writing has been used for but a few years in 
some schools. When I have occasion to 
write to anybody they are very apt to con- 
clude from my handwriting that I have been 
out of school but a few years, and according- 
ly I will be considered a real young woman. 
This does not count for so much at present, 
for I am only 23 years, but it may count a 
great deal in getting me a start in the friend- 
ship of a man later. I will not of course lie 
about my age, but I will get a more favor- 
able start." 



Combination Too Strong. — The Emperor 
of Germany likes to rule the intimacies of 
life as well as to govern the external activi- 
ties of his people. He is often a terror to 
his officers, who rarely dare to oppose his 
ruthless dictation. Following some recent 
manoeuvres the Emperor had a scene with 
a certain elderly officer. The officer in 
question was having a conversation with a 
group of lively young ladies, when the 
Kaiser walked up and, tapping him familiar- 
ly on the shoulder, said: "Your excellency, 
you do wrong in remaining single. Why do 
you not marry one of these young ladies? 
When one is married one is less easily agi- 
tated." The officer smiled, but said nothing. 
"Well," continued his Majesty, "have you 
no response?" "Sire," answered the officer 
at last, "I am too old — too old. A young 
wife and a wilful Emperor would be too 
much for me, I fear." 



Generosity. — The mass of mankind can 
appreciate the benefits of competition bet- 
ter than those of emulation. This is per- 
haps because it is easier to undersell a fel- 
low tradesman and thus win his customers 
away from him, than it is to excel him in 
courtesy and square dealing. Besides money 
talks and a good conscience only whispers 
in a voice which is famous for its stillness 
and only too evidently of the very smallest 
calibre. Generosity pays if charity does 
not ; but it is unconsidered and spontaneous, 
while success in business depends on con- 
sideration even to the uttermost farthing. 
Generosity is a slipshod virtue and not to 
be endured in a hireling. To be generous 
to a foe means usually to feel his fist, and 
the fist of competition feels like failure and 
numbs like the pricks against which we 
must not kick. Nevertheless generosity is 
not a bad sort of thing to indulge in even 
among corporations and rival companies. 
A surplus of giving never hurts except when 
the gifts are wasted. 



in the bond. They might establish, one 
would think, a clearing house of talk, a mod- 
ern temple of conversational winds whence 
rumors blow. Los Angeles is at present 
enmeshed in copper lines of tittle tattle 
which may ne'er unite. A scandal uttered 
over the Home lines is balked of its full 
dynamic power, because, forsooth, it cannot 
reach the Sunset wires without the use of 
another transmitter. This weakens the char- 
acter of the public, for we are all so reluct- 
ant to say unkind things about our neigh- 
bors that we hate to duplicate our vilifica- 
tions by repeating them. A twice-told tale 
is a confirmed fact, and if one could babble 
crime at home without the necessity ot 
running to the adjoining house much virtue 
would escape the gutter. A central ex- 
change between the companies might mul- 
tiply error, but it would also magnify com- 
fort, even if it destroyed some hallucina- 
tions. I often feel that I loath all the sub- 
scribers to my own line, and think of those 
friends who employ the rival line as saints 
and dashing sinners whom I wish I knew 
better. They might conform to my whims 
better. Furthermore it is the butcher whoin 
I owe who uses my line, and it is the butcher 
who does not know me as yet who enjoys 
the other company in a safety which I de- 
plore. I would willingly pay a small fee to 
make his acquaintance. Others, I am sure, 
feel the same. Let us pay a nickel for such 
a service and yoke our ears to the little talk 
of all the town. Pray, dear sirs, stop my 
ears no longer. I would further tarnish the 
silence which your competition now for- 
bids. 



A Tip to the Telephone Companies. — 

These reflections might well be taken to 
heart by our two local telephone companies. 
Apparently they eschew commerce with 
each other by a miserly competition which 
disregards an interchange of service, the 
generosity of doing more than is called for 



The Right of Mankind. — It is an old prob- 
lem whether a dog is happy or miserable 
when he howls. He looks wretched any- 
how, and it is natural to suppose that he is 
as miserable as he looks. It is perhaps bet- 
ter to express one's self by howling than 
not to express one's self at all, but the smile 
of the Japanese which admits of no disaster 
is perhaps carrying the matter too far. One 
of the pleasures of mingling with our Mexi- 
can and Italian neighbors is that whatever 
they are doing they look happy. They do 
not carry the burden of a doubt that happi- 
ness is righteous and not to be feared. Hap- 
piness is not a poultice of fate. In spite of 
dogma and the stars joy is the right of man- 
kind. The pleasures of being dismal are not 
nearly so great as the injuries of being- 
gloomy. The child likes to pout and the 
man to swear. Both are idle tricks conjur- 
ing with demons' art. 

Other People's Business 

By S. M. Crothers, in Atlantic 
I am not one of these who insist that 
everybody should mind his own business; 
that is too harsh a doctrine. One of the 
rights and privileges of a good neighbor is to 
give neighborly advice. But there is a cor- 
responding right on the part of the advisee, 



and that is to take no more of the advice 
that he thinks is good for him. There is one 
thing that a man knows about his own busi- 
ness better than any outsider, and that is 
how hard it is for him to do it. The ad- 
viser is always telling him how to do it in 
the finest possible way, while he, poor fel- 
low, knows that the paramount issue is 
whether he can do it at all. It requires some 
grace on the part of a person who is doing 
the best he can under extremely difficult 
circumstances to accept cheerfully the re- 
marks of the intelligent critic. 
* * * 

Men "Wanted 

By Elbert Hubbard, in Cosmopolitan 

Society seeks men who can serve it. We 
want help, the help of the strong, the sen- 
sible, and the unselfish. The age is crying 
for men — civilization wants men who can 
save it from dissolution ; and those who can 
benefit it most are those who are freest from 
prejudice, revenge, whim and fear. 

Two thousand years ago lived One who 
saw the absurdity of a man's loving only his 
friends. He saw that this meant friction 
and faction, lines of social cleavage, with 
ultimate discord ; and so He painted the 
truth large, and declared that we should 
love our enemies and do good to those who 
might despitefully use us. He was one with 
the erring, the weak, the insane, the poor, 
and He was free from no competition in 
matters of love. If we can imitate his divine 
patience and keep thoughts of discord out 
of our lives, we, too, can work such wonders 
that men will indeed truthfully say that we 
are the sons of God. 

There isn't much rivalry here — be patient, 
generous, kind, even to foolish folk and ab- 
surd people. Do not extricate yourself — 
be one with all, be universal. So little com-' 
petition is there in this line that any man, 
in any walk of life, who puts jealousy, hate 
and fear behind him can make himself dis- 
tinguished. And all good things shall be his 
— they will flow to him. Power r gravitates 
to the man who can use it — and love is the 
highest form of power that exists. If ever 
a man shall live who has infinite power he 
will be found to be one who has infinite love. 
* * * 

Municipal Affairs Non-Partisan 

The era of non-partisanship in municipal 
affairs is dawning. More and more it is be- 
ing recognized that the government of a 
city is a matter of business and not of poli- 
tics. No municipal questions arise upon 
which men can properly divide along party 
lines. Differences of opinion will exist, but 
these differences have no basis in the funda- 
mental principles of the political parties. 
The amount that shall be expended for 
the erection of a city hall, the advisability 
of setting aside land for park purposes, 
whether streets shall be paved with wood 
or asphalt, whether the police force shall be 
enlarged, and similar questions that concern 
the. city government, are not republican or 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



5 



ratic questions, ["he most ardent 

why (>■ "li- 

should determine his 

in a municipal election. It not 1>\ law, 

through the Force of public sentiment, 

the time is surely coming when no 

or mark mi the ballot will designate the 

i" candidates for municipal offices. An 
incre; >unt of attention will be paid 

t.> the qualifications of the respective can- 
didates to administer, honestly, wisely and 
efficiently, the duties of the office to which 
aspire. — Springfield I union. 
+ + + 

So Say the Apologists 
"The 'system' did it. It there were no 
public privileges to give out. there would 
be none to buy or sell them, and hence no 
bribery and graft. Public service corpora- 
tions are usually the bribers. Don't blame 
them : blame the 'system' of farming out 
special privileges." 

So the apologists. And we shall be get- 
ting confessions from Pittsburg, showing 
how the "system" squeezed the consciences 
of men who would as lief have been honest 
if it paid as well. It is of course no excuse 
for the poor man who steals to show that 
he had no other way of getting what he 
wanted, and what he saw other people have. 
He should go without. But when the rich 
man grafts, because there is no other way 
to get privileges which he wants and sorae- 
bod) is sure to get, then it is the 'system.' 
We should lock up the burglar and pick- 
poi let, and after some years, in which they 
have had opportunity to learn no trade but 
stealing, we should turn them loose, to be 
locked tip again immediately, if they re- 
sume stealing'. But we should lead the 
grafters out of temptation, or else forgive 
them when they fall. So, at least, say the 
apologists. — Fresno Republican. 
♦ ♦ ♦ 

On Mercy 
A Saying of Christ from a Coptic MS. 
The subject of mercy brings us to one of 
the longest and most striking passages set 
down by Professor Pick. It occurs in a 
Coptic fragment translated and published 
in 1903 by Professor Julius Bohmer: "It 
happened that the Lord went forth from 
the city and walked with His disciples over 
the mountains. And they came to a moun- 
tain, and the road which led to it was steep. 
There they found a man with a sumpter- 
mule. But the animal had fallen, for the 
burden was too heavy, and he beat it, that 
it bled. And Jesus came to him and said: 
'.Man, why dost thou beat thv animal? 
Seest thou not, that it is too weak for its 
burden, and knowest thou not that it suffers 
pains?' But the man answered and said: 
'What is that to you? I can beat it as much 
as I please, since it is my property, and I 
bought it for a good sum of money. Ask 
those who are with Thee, for they know 
me and know thereof.' And some of the 
disciples said: 'Yea, Lord, it is as he savs. 



We have seen how be bought it.' But the 
Lord sail! : 'Do you not notice how it bl< 

and hear you not. bow it laments ami i i 
But they answered and said: '.\.i\. 
we bear not that it laments and cries.' And 
the Lord was sad and exclaimed: 'Woe to 
i hat ye hear not bow it complains to 
the creator in heaven and cries for mi 
But three time woes to him, of whom it 
complains and cries in its distress.' And He 

i.'] ill ainl touched the animal. And it 
arose and its wounds were healed. \ml 
Jesus said to the man : 'Now, go on and beat 
it no more, that you also may find mercy.' " 

* * * 
WHisiler's Temper 

Whistler once confessed that he some- 
times felt like "a little devil". Mr. Harper 
Pennington relates the following scene 
which he witnessed : 

The only time I saw Jimmy "stumped" 
for a reply was at a sitting of Lady Meux 
(for the portrait in sables). For some rea- 
son Jimmy became nervous — exasperated — 
and impertinent. Touched by something he 
had said, her ladyship turned softly toward 
him and remarked quite softly: "See here, 
Jimmy Whistler! You keep a civil tongue 
in that head of yours, or I will have in some 
one to finish those portraits you have made 
of me !" — with the faintest emphasis on 
"finish." Jimmy fairly danced with rage. 
He came to Lady Meux, his long brush 
tightly grasped, and actually quivering in 
his hand, held tight against his side. He 
stammered, spluttered — and finally gasped 
out: "How dare you? How dare your" — 
but that, after all, was not an answer, was it? 
Lady Meux did not sit again. Jimmy never 
spoke of the incident afterward, and I was 
sorry to have witnessed it. 

♦ * * 

V?he Train of Life 

By Edmund Gosse 
We traced the bleak ridge, to- and fro, 

Grave forty, gay fourteen: 
While yellow larks, in heaven's blue glow, 

Like laughing stars were seen, 
And rose-tipped larches, fringed below, 

Shone fabulously green. 

And as I watched my restless son 

Leap over gorse and briar, 
And felt his golden nature run 

With April sap and fire, 
Methought another madpate spun 

Besides another sire. 

Sudden the thirty years slip by. 

Shot like a curtain's rings! 
My father treads the ridge, and I i 

The boy that leaps and fln,gs, 
While eyes that in the churchyard lie 
Seem smiling tenderest things. 
<• + + 
Love 
Petter a dinner of herbs where love is 
than a stalled ox and hatred therewith. — 
Solomon. 

We are all born for love. It is the prin- 
ciple of existence and its only end. — Dis- 
raeli. 



love to know is hui 

e is divine, Joseph Roux. 

is hu- 
man, bul to love lor the sake of lo\ dug is 

angelic. - Lamartine. 

+ + * 

GJ60 Practical Man 

She ki iry 1 know, 
Which, .i - . mimental would, 

She often reads, she told me so, 

'I'" learn a better life, although 
Already she is plenty g i 

Therefore I send her every day. 

Although reproved bj word and look, 
Flowers, tier conscientious way 
Will not omit their record— they 

Will all be noted in her book. 

And when she rends, my name will face 

On every page her dreamy eyes. 
My awesome bills increase apace, 
Vet it's worth my while to buy the space — 
I believe it pays to advertise. 

— Layton Brewer, in N. Y. Sun. 
* * * 

Beware of the man who cheats himself in 
a game of solitaire. 



A pretty good daily exercise is the exer- 
vise of forbearance. 



If you can't pay as you go, don't go. 



The chronic borrower doesn't like to think 
we shall recognize our friends in heaven. 



The trouble with knaves and fools is that 
they haven't sense enough to keep from be- 
ing found out. 



=<^iT^ 




So.Bkoadwav • c So. Him. Street 

A. PUSENOT CO. 



Our Semi-Annual 
Clearance Sale 




Opens Monday Morning 
January 4, 1909 

The policy of this store demands a clear- 
ance of every article in the season for which 
it was bought. 

This plan assures our patrons a fresh, 
clean stock every season. All odds and 
ends and broken assortments in every de- 
partment are Greatly Reduced in Price to 
effect a rapid clearance before invoicing. 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



A Ship l.lOO Years Old 

An interesting communication has 
been made to the French Academie 
des Inscriptions et Belles-Lettres by 
M. Gabriel Gustafson, cnrator of the 
Christiania Museum, concerning the 
recent discovery in Norway of a Vik- 
ing funeral ship at least eleven hun- 
dred years old. Its mortuary cham- 
ber contained the bodies of two wom- 
en, who, judging from the size of the 
craft and the elaborateness of its ap- 
pointments, evidently belonged to 
some noble and wealthy family. The 
vessel, which is 70 feet long and 16 
feet 6 inches broad, was dug out of a 
tumulus two and one-half miles from 
the shore on the farm of Oseberg, 
near Tomsberg. The treasure was not 
intact. At some remote period, prob- 
ably hundreds of years ago, it had 
been unearthed by unscrupulous visi- 
tors, who had pillaged the mortuary 
chamber of many of the curious relics 
undoubtedly deposited there in accord- 
ance with ancient Norse traditions. 
But in other parts of the ship which 
had apparently escaped the notice of 
the sacrilegious intruders was found 
a large and extremely valuable collec- 
tion of historic remains, including a 
four-wheeled chariot, richly and 
quaintly decorated; four sledges, three 
of them curiously carved; several 
beds, a spinning wheel and a variety 
of kitchen utensils. Diligent exami- 
nation of these has led to the con- 
clusion that the funeral ship belongs 
to the ninth century. One theory is 
that the second woman was a slave, 
condemned to accompany her mis- 
tress to her last sleep. Many of the 
ornaments, mostly of carved wood, 
are unique. The ship and its strange 
cargo, constituting one of the most 
important archaeological finds ever 
made in Scandinavia, will, after being 
carefully restored, be placed in the 
Christiania Museum. 

* * * 
More IrisH Bulls 

At the convention of the Irish race 
last 'month in Dublin, two speakers, 
who had come from the United 
States contributed the following sen- 
tences in the course of their speeches. 

One of them, in giving some de- 
rails of personal hisjtory, informed 
his hearers that "he had left Ireland 
fifty-three years before, a naked little 
boy, without a dollar in his pocket." 

Said the other: "Until last week., 
I had never set foot in the land of 
my birth." 

* * * 
Cement for Armor 

Cement may take the place of steel 
plates as armor on French battleships 
in the near future, as exhaustive ex- 
periments have shown that a certain 
cement of French invention, the for- 
mula of which is kept secret, shows a 
remarkable resistence to shells fired 
from the heaviest naval guns. It is 
stated, however, that the weight of 
the cement armor on a vessel would 
be much less than the steel plates now 
in use. 

The idea of using cement as armor 
is not new, says Harper's Weekly, but 
heretofore it has not been regarded 



as practicable on account of the crack- 
ing of the cement when struck by a 
heavy shell. It is to be inferred that 
the French process renders the ce- 
ment more elastic. During the Russo- 
Japanese war in March, 1904, the Rus- 
sian warship Sebastopol was acci- 
dentally rammed- by the Peresviet, a 
leak seven meters long being made. 
This leak was repaired with cement. 
Later the Sebastopol saw active ser- 
vice, being hit once by a torpedo and 
battered by many shells. After her 
last fight it was found that she had 
been hit by six torpedoes, but the ce- 
ment used in repairing the leak first 
mentioned was found to be practically 
undamaged. The French naval archi- 
tects declare that their cement-pro- 
tected battleships of the future will be 
invulnerable. 

* * * 

Still Prosperous 

Long after the death of the elder 
George Grossmith the British income 
tax commissioners sent to the son, 
the well-known actor, a notice assess- 
ing the income of the deceased at 
$10,000. Mr. Grossmith returned the 
document to the proper quarter, with 
the following note written across it: 

"I am glad^ to learn my father is 
doing so well in the next world; 
$10,000 is a great deal more than he 
ever made in this. Kindly forward 
this notice to his new address, and 
remember me affectionately to him." 

* * * 

Numbering the Presidents 

Will William H. Taft be the twen- 
ty-sixth President or twenty-seventh 
President of the United States? is 
a question interesting some idle minds, 
as it has every time a new President 
has been elected since the administra- 
tion of Benjamin Harrison. Cleve- 
land at his first election was the 
twenty-second president. All agreed 
as to this. Was he the twenty-fourth 
President on his second election, after 
an interval of one term? If so, then 
Mr. Taft will be the twenty-seventh 
President; if not, then he will be the 
twenty-sixth. But if George Wash- 
ington was the first President, even 
through his second term, why should 
Mr. Cleveland be the twenty-fourth 
President in his second term when he 
was the twenty-second President in 
his first term? Let the idle ones pass 
on some other equally harmless post- 
election subject. Mr. Taft will be the 
twenty-sixth President. — Springfield 
Republican. 

* * * 

Too Smart a Boy- 
Traveller — Say, boy, your corn looks 

kind of yellow. 

Boy — Yes, sir. That's the kind we 

planted. 

Traveller — Looks as though you 

will only have a half crop. 

Boy — Don't expect any more. The 

landlord gets the other half. 
Traveller (after a minute's thought) 

— Say, there is not much difference 

between you and a fool, 

Boy — No, sir. Only the fence. — 

Judge's/Library. 



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father of Bab. How she brings the two together and spreads sun- 
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PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



lAwS"-^ (Di 



tth Kmell of Bossasinni 



"What the Direct Primary Accomplished 
in Minnesota 



WHAT iern Pacific 

the railroad o 

»t, lias been to Miiinc- 

\\ hat the 

preparing to 

m rn Pacific machine is 

I ready 

Hill and his political 

In b . corporation h 

by their political piracy, have gained 
the republican party, pros- 
tituted the organization to their own 

private, selfish ends and rendered in- 
on on the part of the 
e impossible. With absolute 
ol of the machinery of the i arty 
have been able to prevent the 
rs from hai i 
n of candidates for pu 
-cd the entire political tickets 
from the state executive and the judi- 
ciary to constable and have made a 
farce of honest effort in politics. 

Here is what George A. Van Smith, 
the writer, bad to -ay two years ago 
regarding Hill's pernfeious influence 
in the administrative affairs of Minne- 
sota and how he was dethroned. His 
narrative is of peculiar and direct in- 
terest to Californians at this time, 
when another effort is about to be 
made to establish a mandatory direct 
nary in this slate: 

"I hie of the most convincing and 
intrinsically valuable proofs of the 
benefits derived from public selection 
indidates for -public office is fur- 
nished by the retirement of James ] 
Hill from the politics of Minnesota. 

"Much to the sorrow of financial 
inconvenience of the old-time 'wheel 
horses,' who prospered and fattened 
in the sunshine of the 'system,' Mr. 
Hill, president of the Great Northern 
Railway company and genius of the 
Northern Securities company, has 
definitely declined further to partici- 
pate in the politics of the North Star 
state. The politics of Minnesota, 
state and district and of the -principal 
municipalities, was absolutely domi- 
nated for years by the system. Mr. 
Hill, by the same process of elimina- 
tion of competition in politics that 
have characterized his wonderful rail- 
road career, became the 'system' soon 
after it assumed proportions worthy 
of the name. Now he has washed his 
hands of the whole unsatisfactory 
business, and the primary election 
law is responsible for the righteous 
ablution. The people of Minnesota 
have in their hands a system which 
the railroad'- system one better. 
They have relieved the interests of 
the onerous duly nf selecting the pub- 
lic's servant.-. 

"The real 'practical politician' — the 
boss, and that lesser luminary, the 
wheel hor-e. aspiring to the dizzy- 
heights of bossism — believes first in 



ligation, flic development of 

American politics has been so c] 

iated with the development of 
the distinctively American commer- 
cialism, that the boss has come to 
read organization and the interests 
synonymously. The wheel- of the 
machine can be moved only by 
money. The interests have money. 
Without them and their money the 
vacation would become unprof- 
itable and uninteresting; machine poli- 
tics would soon be numbered among 
lost arts. Given a community 
iul the interests and that com- 
munity would he promptly and con- 
sistently shunned by the boss. He is 
a practical philanthropist. 

"The roots of the .Minnesota sys- 
tem naturally lie in the railway in- 
ests. In her territorial days and 
later railroads were absolutely essen- 
tial to any substantial development. 
The great prairies, comprising the 
richest wheat fields then known, must 
needs remain barren wastes without 
train outlets to the east. The assist- 
ance of the federal government was 
sought. Land grants were secured 
and honeyed with the bait of immense 
tracks of rich acres, railroad charters 
were passed out for the mere asking. 

"The Minnesota boss was the creat- 
ure of the railroads and in the sun- 
shine of their service and favor he 
lived, fattened and died. The growth 
of the system in Minnesota was, as it 
was ordinarily in other states, per- 
fectly natural. The railroad boss was 
originally a local growth. The ad- 
vantages of 'his industry, however, 
soon became apparent to the states- 
man. What coud be more encourag- 
ing for the big leader than the com- 
forting sense that in the hour of need 
a few railroad counties could be re- 
lied upon to furnish delegations fired, 
with the same brand of patriotic zeal 
that blazed fiercely in his own breast? 
What more natural than that his will- 
ing ear should be turned to the wishes 
of a friend in his hour of need when 
that friend was harassed with the 
threat of unfriendly legislation or 
sought laws favorable to his lofty 
purposes — the subjugation of a new- 
state? 

"Save for one brief bounce into he 
lap of populism, Minnesota has been 
constantly republican. The nominees 
of republican conventions were al- 
ways elected. Uder the old. caucus 
and delegate sytscm, the bosses and 
their heeelers determined the per- 
sonnel and shaped the deliberations 
of conventions. In fine, bosses made 
governors, congressmen and legisla- 
tors, and legislators ratified the bosses' 
choice of material for the United 
States senate. Not everything was 
lovely, though. There was a fly- in 
the ointment. Diversity of owner- 
ship in bosses was well enough as 



IS there v. ci tfllCt of in- 

ill the field of railroad activity. 

\\ hen the came eh- 

.1 in difficulties incident to 

development of new territory, their 

presentatives were placed in 

embarrassing positions calcu- 

to attract the atlcnti. n 
men « and voted 

the ticket. 

"For a third of a century the pe 
pie of Minnesota had been too busy 
doing the thing- first at hand i" give 
more than perfunctory thong hi to the 
manner in which they were being 
ruled. Periodically some student or 
despised 'reformer' would call the at- 
. ntion of the public to railroad spoli- 
ation. These perniciously active fel- 
low- persisted in pointing out that 
while a three per cent gross earnings 
tax contract might have been a splen- 
did thing for the territory and the 
new state, it no longer fitted the 
situation. The people began to take 
notice of railroad aggression. It was 
borne home to them that the rail- 
roads, paying a three per cent gross 
earnings tax, were not bearing their 
fair share of the burden of taxation. 
They asked for legislation to correct 
the disparity by increasing the gross 
earnings tax to four per cent. 

"That stopped dissension among the 
railroads. Instantly they were as one 
against the common enemy, the peo- 
ple. There was a fine showing of a» 
gument made by the legal represen- 
tatives of the Great Northern and the 
Northern Pacific. All the little sys- 
tems were now tails to- the Hill kite. 
Behind the mask of the unconstitu- 
tionality of impairing the contracts 
made by the state in granting the 
charters with a three per cent provi- 
sion, the system pulled the string. 
The legislators voting against the peo- 
ple did not fear them. Did not the 
system decide who should represent 
the people? 

"But that same legislature inadvert- 
ently left ajar the door through which, 
two years later, the people emerged 
. triumphant. The legislature which 
met in 1899 permitted Hennepin 
county, the most populous in the state, 
to experiment with a sadly imperfect 
system of direct primary elections. It 
was the first tap of the death knell 
for the interests. 

"Two years later the wdrole state 
demanded that the Hennepin county 
direct primary law be amended and 
extended to the whole state. The 
press of the state had prosecuted a 
systematic campaign of direct pri- 
mary education. It resulted in a de- 
mand so general and so nearly unani- 
mous on the part of the people for 
relief from bossism that there could 
be no denial. The boss resisted as far 
as he dared; and then ungracefully 
succumbed to the inevitable. 

"When the members of the legisla- 
ture came together to consider anew 
the proposition for increase of rail- 
road gross earnings tax, they were at 
the same time forced to consider the 
people. Preceding the next election, 
there would be no boss-dominated 



dates the fa 

iple them- 
selves i',y It, 

standa 

"Incidentally, tl 

i ; i inds the po« er 

the men who m iv, desi rted I he n foi 
the railroads. The pe iple i ame in for 

thru- first large -liar; in til CO! 
ation of the Minnesota legislature. 

"And fear of the people proved 
stronger than personal avarice or fear 
ol i lie raili oads. Could nol the peo 
pie reward as well as punish? A bill 
submitting to the people a proposi 
tion for increased gross earnings tax 
for railroads was passed. The rip 
of the interests was broken. The 
days of its domination were num- 
bered. 

"The people have ratified the propo- 
sition for the increase of railroads' 
gross earnings tax. The interests' 
cry of unconstitutionality is stilled. 
The enactment of the direct primary 
law was the handwriting- on the wall, 
so large that all might read. The re- 
fusal of Mr, Hill to furnish the sinews 
of war for any campaign, local or gen- 
eral, in the state, as contrasted with 
a single fund of considerably more 
than $100,000 furnished for the elec- 
tion of a very recent governor of 
Minnesota, is for the boss lamentable 
but conclusive proof that the interests 
have read the legend on the wall." 

* ♦ ♦ 

©>6e Ring Out of Debt 

Edward of England is reported as 
wearing a smile of such unusual 
breadth and amiability as to excite re- 
mark among those who see him. His 
good spirits are explained in a Paris 
dispatch to the New York Sun as due 
to the fact that this monarch of a 
world-wide empire is out of debt! It 
seems that when Edward was Prince 
of Wales, and Queen Victoria was 
living in retirement, he had to act as 
representative of the Crown on many 
occasions,* receive foreign monarchs, 
and live in a style suitable to a sov- 
ereign, on an income of $400,000 a 
year. Victoria was enjoying an in- 
come of $3,000,000. We read further: 

For some ten years things went on 
smoothly enough, externally, while 
the Prince got deeper- and deeper into 
debt. At length the day came when 
the Rothschilds would no lunger pro- 
vide money for him. An appeal for 
assistance made to Queen Victoria 
met with a refusal; her son's extrava- 
gance, she said, ought not to be en- 
ci iuraged. 

It was only when the Prince threat- 
ened to throw himself on the gener- 
osity of Parliament, a procedure most 
distasteful to Queen Victoria, because 
she had to resort to it so often for 
her numerous family, that -he was 
moved on ions to pr 

some assistance. Then aros 
of private benefactors who either 
from personal devotion or worldly 
ambition devoted their weal 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



storing the Prince's financial posi- 
tion. 

The first of these was Sir James 
Mackenzie, a man who had begun 
life as a working hat-maker. He went 
to India in the days when the India 
Company's officials, military and civil, 
wore wonderful headgear, which the 
native princes sought to copy. Com- 
ing into contact with these princes 
to supply their wants in headdresses, 
Mackenzie made a great fortune. 
During the Indian Mutiny many 
princes entrusted their priceless stores 
of jewels to 'his safekeeping until 
peace and quiet returned once more. 

One of Sir James Mackenzie's acts 
of generosity was to buy in the name 
of the Prince one of the finest estates 
near Ascot to enable him to keep up 
royal style during race week, as 
Queen Victoria had limited him to a 
very reduced program for this great 
society function. Unfortunately, Sir 
James died suddenly without having 
the time to settle his affairs and with- 
out making a will, so that the Prince 
was brought face to face with a de- 
mand to pay some $1,600,000 to the 
executors. 

This difficulty was solved by a sec- 
ond benefactor, Baron de Hirsch, 
who assumed the responsibility of the 
debt. The Baron had already in 1890 
enabled the Prince to pay back to 
Kaiser William II. the money he had 
borrowed from his sister, the wife of 
the Emperor Frederick. Soon after 
the Baron, too, died without arrang- 
ing as to the repayment of the sums 
he had advanced. 

Cecil Rhodes and his South African 
associates were the saviors of the fu- 
ture master of the British Empire 
from these new difficulties. How far 
the Prince participated in their specu- 
lations is known only to those most 
closely connected with them. 

At last the Prince became Kinig. 
Everyone expected that Parliament 
would at once be asked to relieve him 
of the heavy burden of debt that 
weighed upon him, for Queen Victoria 
had left most of her fortune to the 
younger members of her family. To 
every one's astonishment no such re- 
quest was made, and the Government 
announced that the civil list would 
not be increased. The King had 
found another solution. 

Three tried friends, Sir Edward 
Cassel, the Anglo-German financier, 
who had earned renown and wealth 
in Egypt; Lord Farquhar, governor of 
one of London's greatest banks, and 
Lord Esher, a partner of Sir Edward 
Cassel's, assumed all the King's debts 
and undertook the administration of 
his whole income, public and private. 

They established a sinking-fund, 
signed insurance policies, and with 
their great financial opportunities rea- 
lized great profits by successful in- 
vestments. A few years of this ener- 
getic treatment enabled them to wipe 
out the royal indebtedness, and now 
for a year the balance has been in 
favor of Edward VII. And that is 
Why Edward now wears the smile that- 
Europe envies him. 



Chang'es in the Chinese 

An American missionary in China, 
Dr. J. B. Fearn, has recently discuss- 
ed before the Shanghai Missionary 
Asociation the changes which are oc- 
curring in the Chinese as individuals. 

He is quoted in the Journal of the 
American Asiatic Association as say- 
ing that all our mission institutes of 
learning in that country are crowded. 

"Ten or twelve years ago," he says, 
"to get a full school it was necessary 
to furnish everything free; in some 
cases even the clothing. Even then 
the pupils thought they were con- 
ferring more or less of a favor on 
the foreign educator by allowing 
themselves to be taught from Wes- 
tern books. 

"How different it is now! Large 
colleges full of students who gladly 
pay all their expenses, which in some 
cases is no small sum, and many per- 
haps who would- be willing to pay 
twice the amount for what they now 
realize in their changed mental condi- 
tion to be true education. 

"Go back ten years and call to mina 
the little group of boys in a small 
room memorizing the Chinese charac- 
ter with absolutely no idea as to its 
meaning — that would come later — any 
lack of zeal in their studies being 
evinced by a slight lull in the pande- 
monium, which was immediately cor- 
rected by a sharp rap on the table and 
a fierce glare from the teacher. 

"At present there is a trained 
teacher who in our mission schools 
at least knows his business. The stu- 
dents are busy with such studies as 
are claiming the attention of school- 
boys in the home land. The room is 
well kept, well ventilated and the pu- 
pils are orderly. A certain amount of 
discipline is evident, not to prepare 
for war but to teach unity of purpose 
and action. 

"This change has brought new 
methods of examination for official 
preferment. Thus we see that the 
change in the individual Chinese has 
brought about a change in the entire 
educational system of this enormous 
empire. 

"When we come to note the change 
in the social life of the Chinese we do 
not find such a wide field as in the 
above, largely due to the fact that 
their social system satisfies them and 
is adequate for their purposes. What 
change there is is seen more in the 
manner of giving expression to this 
side of their nature than any real 
change in the fibre of their social sys- 
tem. 

"They still have their clubs or 
guilds, where the members meet to 
discuss their business or engage in 
some game — usually of chance. In 
ports they meet around a foreign 
'spread' instead of their native feast. 
They drink the wine common to for- 
eigners instead of the famous wine of 
Shaohsing. 

"Man and wife are more frequent- 
ly seen together in public places, 
though quite often as they walk the 
streets together the man will he about 
three feet ahead of his wife, with an 
expression upon his face as though he 



were doing something wrong and 
feared .being arrested. In other cases 
their appearance is quite natural and 
in many cases the man is quite at- 
tentive." 

Another example of the change go- 
ing on is, according to Dr. Fearn, the 



desire expressed in many quarters for 
a new marriage ceremony. "Years 
ago," he says, "it was difficult to get 
even our converts to use the church 
form." Now the missionaries are 
asked by unconverted Chinese to offi- 
ciate and find "that they are largely 




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PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



a change 

In ihcir business method! 

. ri kia' r I that 

will be no reduction in i 

wa- 
il Zien in 

From the cu 
irice with tl 
if being beaten down. Now 
quite common. 
"In their rclati igners we 

.tl tcstimoi 
the change which has come over the 
individual and we can all 

mire nation. A 
themselves the things 
which we have been doing 

rms the pivot upon which 
have turned. 
"Ten or fifteen years ago tin- For- 
eigner did everything for the Chinese 
— drilled her troops, comm; 
navy, established and conducted her 
schools and in many other 
showed the Chinese how the tiling 
should be done. A few year- ago 
they grew restive under this Mid be- 
gan to look about for themselves. 

In many cases they endeavored to 
do what was entirely beyond them. 
and not infrequently when they met 
defeat were not only unwise enough 
efuse to admit their inability but, 
tve i^^-c. persisted in their efforts 
to stand alone and — inconsistently 
jli — felt a jealous resentment to- 
ward the foreigner. 

"Many of us can well remember the 
time when the fact that a man was a 
foreigner was ample proof to the 
Chinese of integrity and uprightness; 
also, how sometimes it was hard to 
convince our acquaintances that there 
were wicked foreigners as well as 
wicked Chinese. 

"It is the rude awakening from this 
deception which is mainly responsible 
for the chained attitude on the part of 
a large number of Chinese. In former 
days they trusted every foreigner; 
now they go forward with care, and 
Unless a man proves himself trust- 
worthy he is looked upon with dis- 
trust." 

•J* 4 s •?* 

G>6e American and His Daug'hter 

Here is a striking English estimate 
of i he American man and his daugh- 
ter, by Hughes Leroux: 

"Whatever the speed of the whirl- 
wind may be. its centre is immobile 
The immobile centre of tins intense 
;i ihilii n, which characterizes Ameri- 
can life, is the American man. Oil- 
serve him. Have you ever contem- 
plated a calmer mask, a more fixed 
expression' One would say that h : 
is entirely self-centered, lie ru'riin- 
ates his thought in silence. If he 

■ i 1 s. ii is in monosyllables. 

"With us every well-bred man 
po sesses general culture. A man of 
the world has ideas about everything. 
The American business man displays 
a sovereign disdain for this superficial 



universality of ! The im- 

nt thing, hi know 

I to know one thing 
. and to be able to make 
I it. The gist of the matter i- 
two men have totally dif 
tlways de- 
sired to win affection. The 
American wishes to act and amass 

lie declares, 'Busini 
oil, it mixes with nothing.' And when 
the big business man pronounces this 
aphorism it is not only at the dis 

Ailing; 
it is all the preoccupations of so- 
ciety—philosophical, scientific. po- 
litical, literary, artistic, etc. — all the 
speculations which divert a man from 
the unique fixed passion to which he 
- lo consecrate al his energies. 

"This American man who has put 
forth Frenzied efforts, who has earned 
with his toil the civilization of which 
the woman reaps all tin advantages, 
does not encounter in his country 
todaj a woman of his species. 

"Thus we find ourselves in the 
presence of two distinct human cate- 
gories. The one. the masculine, is a 
product of convulsive efforts, of im- 
perious decisions, of commercial vio- 
lences, of unheardof intensities, fol- 
lowed by sentimental timidities and 
psychic prostrations. The other, the 
feminine, is a field of leisure, of cul-. 
ture. of refinement, where in economic 
and social independence, and with a 
total absence of all responsibility, 
flourish exceptional knowledge and a 
passion for luxury. 

"The American man, so ambitious, 
so democratic, has made of his 
daughter an aristocrat without a 
court, a goddess without an Olympus, 
a picture without a frame, a raffinee 
without a milieu. And what, pray, 
are all the perfections of the world 
if they remain scattered, isolated, if 
they do not find a milieu to .group 
them, to set them aff?" 
<|> 4> $ 

c7/?e Dropping Chest 

Harry Kellar, the retired magician, 
was talking in Philadelphia about, 
stage magic. 

"It is not," he said, "so good as it 
used to be. The younger magicians 
do not study and practice as we of 
the previous generation did. Hence, 
nowadays, stage magic appears ra- 
ther tame. 

"But the young magicians don't 
think so. They are like an elderly fat 
man whom I saw at my tailor's the 
other day . 

" 'Let me see, sir,' said the tailor, 
'you haven't been in for two or three 
years. Perhaps I had better measure 
yi iu.' 

" All right.' said the fat man. 
'You'll find no change in my figure, 
though.' 

"The tailor got to work with his 
tape. The measurements were called 
'in ami jotted down The fat man 
- id at the end: 

"'Well, the measurements are about 
the same as they used to be. eh?' 

" 'Yes, sir. about the same." was 
the reply. 'Chest a trifle lower down. 
that's all. sir.' " 



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MAIN 213 



10 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



AMUSEMENTS 



The Opera Season 

The return of the Lambardi Grand 
Opera company to Los Angeles this 
week is the event of the season in 
musical circles. There have been 
numerous changes in the company, 
some of the singers who won great 
popularity during the company's first 
season here not having returned. But 
the present aggregation is fully up to 
the standard set by the original com- 
pany. 

The season opened Monday night 
■(vith Rigoletto. The hardest and 
most effective work fell to the lot of 
Allesandro Modesti, who sang the 
title role. It was his first appearance 
in this city. His interpretation of the 
part was masterful. He is the posses- 
sor of an unusually agreeable, flexible 
baritone voice, and sings with great 
feeling. It is seldom that local audi- 
ences are privileged to hear more fin- 
ished work by a baritone. Personally 
I was somewhat disappointed in the 
work of Tamanti Zavaski, who sang 
Gilda. She lacked the sympathetic 
quality demanded for this role. Not-' 
withstanding this, her method is fault- 
less. Nothing but words of praise 
should be uttered when commenting 
upon her coloratura work. Engenio 
Battain, who sang the part of the 
Duke, is a tenor with a voice of that 
rare quality which, while almost 
shrill in the high register, is not of- 
fensive. On the contrary it is sweet., 
lacking the metallic or the reed-like 
quality which characterizes most 
voices of its kind. Paolo Wulman, 
who is known to local audiences, hav- 
ing been a member of the company 
which appeared here two years ago, 
sang Sparafucile with excellent effect. 
his fine, big baritone voice being even 
more agreeable than formerly. The 
remainder of the cast was highly ac- 
ceptable. 

Tuesday II Trovatore was sung, and 
Wednesday La Boheme, which cre- 
ated something of a sensation when 
produced by the same company on its 
first visit to this city. Wednesday 
evening's audience was most apprecia- 
tive of the artistic work of the com- 
pany. Encores were frequent, but the 
conductor permitted but two or three 
responses. Ester Ferrabini, who cap- 
tured the audience on the first appear- 
ance of the company, sang Mimi. 
Once more she convinced me that she 
is one of the most finished artistes 
who has ever visited this coast in 
grand opera. Her work Wednesday 
evening was as near perfection, all 
things considered, as one may rea- 
sonably expect to witness on the 
opera stage. 

The other productions rendered this 
week are Carmen, Faust and Lucia. 
Four operas will be sung next week, 
the first three nights of the week and 
Wednesday matinee. 



Stcne Returns to the Belasco 

Lewis Stone returned to the Belasco 

this week and with many members of 

the company, he received a joyous 

welcome from the patrons of the 



theater. As 'M>r. Stone said in his 
impromptu speech on the opening 
night, marine glasses and ear trum- 
pets will no longer be required to see 
and to hear with when going to see 
his troup of players. The Auditorium 
salle is too large and too mournful 
for the production of light comedy. 

The play chosen for the return of 
Mr. Stone to Main street is "The 
Easterner," by George Broadhurst. 
The first two acts seem overcrowded 
or jumbled. The incidents of the 
play and the necessary explanations 
are heterogeneous, not following each 
other as smoothly as might be. The 
third act gives Mr. Stone a chance as 
John Warden to play the amateur de- 
tective with absorbing effect. The 
fourth act is weak. Robert Brunton 
has again given us an attractive set- 
ting for the third act. Ben Graham 
and Richard Vivian are the only two 
members of the present company who 
have not appeared at the Auditorium. 
Dewitt Jennings maintains a high 
standard of excellence in his work 
and seems bound to win many friends 
among the public. Bennett South- 
ard played the part of Pedro Sanchez 
well, giving, however, a somewhat 
Italianized Spaniard. There is not a 
great deal for the women of the play 
to do and two of the principal charac- 
ters are shot before 'the end of the 
. play. Miss Preston was quite inade- 
quate as JDora. If the play seems 
rather loosely jointed and lacking in 
compactness with the exception of 
the third act it is nevertheless of suf- 
ficient interest to hold the attention 
for most of the time. We are glad 
to welcome Mir. Stone and his com- 
pany to the Belasco boards again and 
we sincerely trust that they may re- 
main there and prosper. 



"The New Magadalen" . 

"Zira" is a play founded on a novel 
by Wilkie Collins which afforded the 
basis of a drama in which Clara Mor- 
ris appeared with great success a 
number of years ago. The version at 
the Burbank is a revised, one which 
changes the scene of the prologue 
from France in 1870 to South Africa 
during the Boer war. 

Miss Mary Hall takes the part of 
Hester Trent. In the first part of the 
play, where she displays a suppressed 
emotion, she seems a little stolid, but 
in the third act, where her emotions 
are aroused, she carries the audience 
with her. She dominates by force 
rather than by subtlety, however, and 
one's, feeling for Hester Trent is char- 
itable rather than sympathetic. Cap- 
tain Sylvester was well played by 
Byron Beasley. Harry Stockbridge 
can hardly divest himself of the indig- 
nities of comedy sufficiently to assume 
the authority of a bishop's garb. He 
carried his episcopal honors lightly 
and if only he might have uttered 
some Gilbertian paradox he would 
have been perfect as an embodiment 
of one of the Bab Ballads. 

Actors must sometimes find an au- 
dience exasperating. An example of 
public stupidity was shown this week. 

At the Burbank William Des- 



mond as Gordon Clavering tries 
to comfort his aunt, Lady Clav- 
ering, played by Louise Royce. He 
takes her in his arms and says to her: 
"We have never been so near be- 
fore," when apparently the whole au- 
dience titters, destroying what other- 
wise should be a touching scene. How 
must an artist feel under such bar- 
baric treatment. Life may be a joke 
but certainly is not a monstrosity, as 
inopportune giggles make it appear. 

Homely Drama 

"Sis Hopkins" came to the Majestic 
this week. She was welcomed as an 
-old friend and received with joy.. The 
play is of the homely, provincial sort. 
The chief character represents that 
class of country folks whose enlight- 
enment comes entirely through the 
heart and not at all through the in- 
tellect. Their highest pitch is a quite 
unsophisticated loyalty and affection, 
unblundered by books. This probably 
accounts for the great popularity of 
the piece, for the plot is slight and 
several of the characters are mere -au- 
tomatons. 

Rose Melville is most refreshing as 
Sis. She is the center of interest 




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PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



11 



throughout the i 

h an 
eroph! artifi- 

membcr* oi the 

Maxwell 
diah was iItmII with his perennial 
interest in the dead. 

Thi- cond play which we 

have seen in I cently 

icfa i> laid in Indiana. 
In both cases we have been presi 
with buildings in 'i reign 

mold Wl Parthenia Peck- 



E. H. Sothem's Engagement 

11 on 
J ami. 

: n in a - lire of 

irs i'ir the 
last three nights of the week and pre- 
sents a iturday matinee, 

In ; gement Mr. 

Sothern will be seen in a rep 
of widely diversified portrayals 

ive theatei ; I unity 

hint in Rii lace, 11. un- 

let and Lord Dundreary. hi these 
three plays he is seen in romantic 
drama, eccentric comedy and Shakes- 
pearean tra 
The dates of bis repertoire are as 




E. H. Sothern as 

over, who "runs" a seminary, have a 
music room like a bourgeois salon in 
some provincial town of France din- 
ing the seventies. The setting for 
the second act seems to be foolishly 
untrue to the possibilities of Indiana 
Perhaps I do Indiana an injustice. I 
trust not. One does not look for the 
taste of Pontoise in New Harmony, 
Indiana. But Sis herself is so (lis 
tinctly an American product and so 
much fun that it is easy to pardon, if 
one does not overlook the minor im- 
perfections of the production 

The play will remain at the Majes- 
tic for two weeks. 

DON. 



Lord Dundreary 

follows: Thursday night and Satur- 
day matinee. Richard Lovelace; Fri 
day night. Lord Dundreary, and Sat- 
urday night. Hamlet. 

Richard Lovelace is the latest dra- 
matic impersonation Mr. Sothern has 
yet given to the stage. He produced 
the play three weeks ago in Louisville 
for the first time and won such an 
enthusiastic reception that fie is ar- 
ranging to take the play to New York 
for a long run. 

As Lord 'Dundreary, theater.' 
will see revived for the first time in 
twenty-five years the most noted 
comedy characterization of the Amer- 
ican stage. Mr. Sothern presents Lord 



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12 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



Dundreary as given by his father, E. 
A. Sothern, until the time of his deatn 
in 1881. 

Mr. Sothern's Shakespearean per- 
formance of Hamlet will attract the 
attention of all lovers of the drama. 
Since he was last seen here he ap- 
peared in London for an engagement 
with Miss Julia Marlowe in a Shakes- 
pearean season and the English critics 
acknowledged him to be among the 
greatest exponents seen in Britain. 



LITERARY NOTES 



Paul Armstrong's comedy drama, 
The H : eir of the Hoorah, which will be 
played by Lewis S. Stone and the Be- 
lasco Theater company next week, 
ought to prove an especially happy- 
selection. The piece abounds in 
laugh-provoking lines and situations 
and for the greater part of the four 
acts the play is a rollicking comedy. 
There is a note of tragedy in the tem- 
porary estrangement of the western 
man, Joe Lacy, and his eastern wife, 
but with the final drop of the curtain 
comes the inevitably happy termina- 
tion. "The Heir to the Hoorah" is 
such a valuable piece of theatrical 
property that it is still being played 
in the high-priced syndicate theaters 
with no abatement in the interest the 
public has manifested since the origi- 
nal production three years ago. The 
play will afford Lewis S. 'Stone and 
the Belasco actors many fine chances 
for good acting. Following "The 
Heir to the Hoorah' 3 the Belasco at- 
traction will be John Drew's success 
of a few seasons ago, "The Second 
in Command." 

* * * 

A. Kipling Story 

"Rudyard Kipling, when he dined 
with me," sa,id a literary Chicagoan, 
"told me about Simla. 

"It seems, that Simla is up in the 
mountains — the hills, as they say in 
India — and the ladies go there in the 
hot weather to escape the heat of the 
low country. 

"Well, Kipling said that one lovely, 
cool morning at Simla he was pre- 
sented to a 'grass-widow.' They call 
those ladies 'grass-widows' whose 
husbands are detained by work in the 
hot cities of the plains. 

"She was awfully pretty and charm- 
ing, and, as they talked together in 
the pleasant coolness, Kipling said: 

" T suppose you can't help thinking 
of your poor husband grilling down 
below?' 

"The lady gave him a strange look, 
and he learned afterwards that she 
was a real widow." 



Sorrows of Childhood 

"By George," said the expatriate, 
"the unnatural ness of living in an 
apartment never struck me so forcibly 
as when my two kids laid their letters 
to Santa Claus on top of the steam 
radiator and went off to bed trying to 
figure how Santa Claus could come 
down the steam pipes and up through 
the coils. I went out to buy a cigar 
before they could ask me. Poor little 
kids, no stockings hung by the chim- 
ney for them." 



.By Perez Fiei,d 

Robert Hichens, we are told, was 
absorbed in music and poetry before 
he began to write novels. There came 
an evening when a famous prima 
donna warbled one of his songs. "I 
took a seat and waited in a fever of 
anxiety," the novelist is quoted as 
saying. "The applause was tremen- 
dous, and I was in a heaven of pride, 
when I heard two voices behind me. 
'What a lovely song that was!' ex- 
claimed one. 'Yes,' agreed the other, 
'but what awful rot the words of 
those songs always are!'" 



Book selling, it appears, varies with 
the weather: A London bookseller 
declares that bad weather, wet, 
gloomy weather, brings purchasers. 
"People," he says, "are bored by the 
necessity of staying indoors. I find 
our post * much heavier after a wet 
than after a fine day." 



In his new book on King George T 
Lewis Melville has retold all the 
pleasant stories he could find about 
the Hanoverian. Here is one of 
them: 

When a masked lady at a ball asked 
him to fill his glass, and then in- 
vited him to drain it to the toast of 
the Pretender, "I will drink," he re- 
plied, with a bow to his unknown 
companion, "I will drink with all my 
heart to the health of any unfortunate 
Prince!" 

Another story — taken from the 
Percy anecdotes — shows equal amia- 
bility: 

Told that an acquaintance of long 
standing, on hearing the news of his 
accession to the 'English throne, had 
remarked, 'T have no objection to 
smoke a pipe with nim as Elector 
of Hanover, but I cannot recognize 
him as King of England," far from be- 
ing angry, George expressed his re- 
gret that political differences should 
separate him from a man he loved. 

When a Tower official came in agi- 
tation to tell the King that Lord 
Nithsdale had escaped he found 
George in a far from ferocious mood: 

"What!" cried his majesty, "Is the 
city on fire, or is there a new insur- 
rection?" 

"Neither, sire, but Lord Nithsdale 
has escaped." 

"Is that all?" said George. "It was 
the wisest thing he could do, and what 
I would have done in his place. And 
pray, Mr. Lieutenant, be not too dili- 
gent in searching after him, for I wish 
for no man's blood." 



Wilkie Collins, like many other au- 
thors, was fond of cats. In the re- 
cently published Lehmann reminis- 
cences is to be found a letter writ- 
ten in Italy by Collins, a passage in 
which runs as follows: 

Oh, I wanted you so at Rome in 
the Protestant cemetery — don't start! 
No ghosts — only a cat. I went to 
show my friend Pigott the grave of 
the illustrious Shelley. Approaching 
the resting place of the divine poet in 



a bright sunlight, the finest black 
torn you ever saw discovered at an 
incredible distance that a catan- 
thropist had entered the cemetery — 
rushed up at a gallop, with his tail at 
right angles to his spine — turned over 
on his 'back with his four paws in the 
air, and said in the language of cats, 
"Shelley be hanged! Come and 
tickle me!" I stooped and tickled 
him. We were both profoundly af- 
fected. 



I GROW HAIR. 



Frederic Harrison, the veteran 
Positivist and man of letters, has 
come forward as an opponent of 
woman's suffrage. He is one of the 
most brilliant thinkers of the day and 
he lias achieved fame in many ways. 
Mr. Harrison is the leading exponent 
of the philosophy of Comte in Eng- 
land and probably in the world. Al- 
though he is over seventy, he is still 
as active and well as many men half 
his age, Mr. Harrison's "rules of life" 
are worth recording for the benefit of 
mankind. They are as follows: 
Touch not tobacco, spirits, nor any 
unclean thing. Rise from every meal 
with an appetite. Walk daily for two 
hours. Sleep nightly for seven hours. 
Reverence all to whom reverence is 
due. Be content with what you have." 

Mr. Harrison's hatred of tobacco is 
curious, considering that most thinkers 
and literary men have been greatly 
addicted to its use. But of all bad 
things in a sadly imperfect world, 
Mr. Harrison probably awards the 
palm of badness to the seductive weed. 
He regards smoking as "a beastly 
disease, to be shunned on grounds 
moral, social, aesthetic, and medical"; 
and if he has one other horror be- 
sides the smoker, it is the man or 
woman who spends his or her time 
in gambling at cards in a stuffy draw- 
ing-room. 

Elizabeth Pennell in a book on 
cookery says: "A woman who has 
mastered sauces, sits on the apex of 
civilization," and, again, in speaking 
of "little luncheons," she says, "Many 
are the men who have painted pic- 
tures, few are those who have com- 
posed a really new and perfect sand- 
wich — a delicious thing that can be 
horrid." 



New Books at the Public Library 
The only new book added to the 
library this week is called "Chasing 
the Cure in Colorado", by Thomas 
Crawford Galbreath (Denver, 1908 — 
No. 616-24:15). This title at any rate 
is not inappropriate for holiday week, 
as Xmas banquets sometimes afflict 
in spite of their toothsome qualities. 
However this book does not deal with 
the pains incidental to one good din- 
ner a year. It treats of tuberculosis 
and the open-air cure of that modern 
plague. 

* * * 
Mr. Alliot's Lecture 
Hector Alliot is giving a course of 
lectures in She Ruskin Art Rooms, 
Blanchard Hall, on French Litera- 
ture and Fine Arts. There are to be 
eighteen lectures in the series, the 
fifth of which will be given January 
4 at ten-thirty a. m. T. P. O'Connor 




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Good Things to Eat 

Just a Little Better than Mother 

Ever Made 

Home Canned Fruits 

Put up by J. E. Taylor & Co., 
Santa Ana, Cal. 

We sell direct to the consumer. 

ROBERT MADISON 
Sole Agent for Los Angeles County 

Phone F 1552, 715 S. Grand Ave. 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



13 



hI he 

only 

it were, tlic data 
achievement for hu- 

the French 
.v in the plas'ic and 

+ + + 

System 
A German can ik the tii'iy- 

i a Western whole- 
in New York and walked 
into the office, where one of the pro- 
prietors was busy at his < 
The canvasser was told that the 
I nothing in hi* line, but 
ed in opening his sample 
nd making himself the can-, ol 
much distress, until finally the enrag- 
ed proprietor kicked him down the 
first flight of stairs. An employe, 
ving the mode of descent, re- 
peated the dose with like effect, and 
it was dittoed till the unfortunate 
German found himself on the curb- 
i highway. 
Shaking himself-, he looked hack 
the course of the events and 
ejaculated: 

"Veil, dot isli a great establishment. 
I don't know deir particular line of 
peesness, but my! Yat system, vat 
em!" 

E.ulog*y on the Dog 

Senator Yest had been retained as 
the attorney of a man whose dog had 
been wantonly shot by a neighbor, ft 
is said the plaitiff demanded $2U0. 
When Vest finished speaking the jury- 
awarded $500 without leaving their 
seats. The speech, in full, is as fol- 
lows: 

"Gentlemen of the jury — The best 
friend a man has in this world may 
turn against him and become his en- 
emy. His son or daughter that he 
has reared with loving care may 
prove ungrateful. Those who are 
nearest and dearest to us, those whom 
we trust with our happiness and our 
good name, may become traitors 1" 
their faith. The money that a man 
has he may lose. It flies away from, 
perhaps when he needs it most. \ 
man's reputation may be sacrificed in 
a moment of ill-considered action. 
The people who are prone to fall on 
tluir Lulls tn do us honor when sue 
ccs, is with us may be the first to 
throw the -tone of malice when fail- 
ure settles its cloud upon our heads. 
The one absolutely unselfish friend 
that man can have in this selfish 
world, the one that never deserts 
him, the one that never proves un- 
grateful or treacherous is his dog 
Gentlemen of the jury, a man', dug 
tands 1>\ him in pn isperity and in 
poverty, in health and in sickness. II 
w ill sleep on tin '."Id l round, « hi re 
the wintry winds blow and the -now 



onlj he may 
He will 

he hand th 

that come in encounter with the 
i Id. He guards 
the - his pauper m 

as if he were a prince. When 
rings and reputation 
falls to pieces he is as constant 
in his love as the sun in its journey 
through the heaven-. If fortune 
drive- the master forth an outcast in 
the world. Friendless and horn 
the faithful no higher privi- 

lege than that of accompanying him 
to fight 

-i his enemies, and death takes 
the master in its embrace and his 

■- laid away in the cold ground, 
no matter if all other friends pursue 
their way. there by his graveside will 
the noble dog be found, his head be- 
tween his paws, his eyes sad but open 
in alert watchfulness, faithful and true 
even to death." 

* * * 

Three Stories from Canada 

A campaign story related by R. L. 
Rordcn, a leader of the Conservative 
party in Canada, is that of an Irish- 
man who asked a boor what breed of 
an animal his dog was. 

"That," said the boor, "is a cross 
between an Irishman and a monkey." 

"Why in that case," was the re- 
tort, "he's related to us both." 

It is, however, in stories of Nova 
Scotia politics, of which he has a 
great store, that Mr. Borden is most 
interesting. One he tells is of the 
only occasion when Fraser, of Guys- 
boro', an old campaigner, and at 
present Lieutenant-Governor of Nova 
Scotia, was disconcerted at a public 
meeting. Mr. Fraser is an opponent 
of corporal punishment, and in a 
speech denouncing it he said that on 
the only occasion that he had been 
whipped when a child at school it was 
for speaking the truth. Hardly had 
the words passed his lips when a dry 
Scotch lad piped, out: 

"An' it cured ye, Tuncan!" 

Mr. Borden also tells of a member 
of the Nova Scotia Legislature who 
was prone to become prolix when he 
got upon his feet, and realized the 
fact. One day after he had spoken at 
length on some trivial subject to 
which he had intended to devote only 
a few minutes, he said: 

"Mr. Speaker, I fear that I hav." 
spoken too long, but I am like a man 
who embarks in a canoe and gets into 
the current and loses control of his 
craft. He swirls on and passing head- 
land and cove, into the rapids he 
-wirls, and " 

So would the orator have con- 
tinued another five minutes had not 
a fellow- member intervened with the 
words: "Well, why doesn't he jump 
out !" 

* + + 
Anchors for Battleships 

"If some of the sea worthies could 
come to earth and gel a look at the 

n hors w liicli v. .i , reci ntly turned 
in i hi I harlestown navy yard 



not believe then 
-aid II M Knight "f Boston, "Battle- 
ships nowadays carry four anc 

heretofore, but 

they were liable to break at the wrong- 
time. 

"They- were SO big, however, that 
med there was no other w 
make them. Finally it was di 
to try and forge an anchor of the size 
needed at tin I h.n le-l. iv, n i ,t\ J 

irdingly five men wen- set at 

on an anchor which was to 
weigh 17,600 pounds. The men 
worked on the anchor a month and 
then turned out one that stood all the 

tests and » as accepted. Now they are 
making those anchors in the yard in 
sets of fours for shipment wherever 
they are needed. 

"These anchors will hold the larg- 
est battleships afloat unless they are 
caught in a hurricane. They are im- 
mense affairs. They are fifteen feet 
long from crown to shackle and' about 
nine and a half feet across from point 
to point. The palms at the arm ends, 
which get the grip on the bottom, are 
thirty-two inches wide. Several sets 
have been shipped to the Pacific Coast 
to go on battleships at the stations 
on that coast." — Milwaukee Sentinel. 

* * * 

A. Serious Objection 

That the scoffers and cross-ques- 
tioners of the Suffragettes often bring 
confusion upon their own heads was 
well illustrated at a recent meeting 
at which Mrs. Borrmann Wells was 
delivering an address. A man had 
asked several questions, and in each 
instance received a prompt reply. His 
final query was: • 

"Why don't you get married?" 
"There is one serious objection to 
your suggestion," replied Mrs. Wells, 
"and the objection I refer to is at 
present standing beside this platform 
in the person of Mr. Wells." 

Puzzling Canadian Time 

A traveller at the Union depot this 
morning was looking up some Cana- 
dian connections, says the Kansas 
City Star. 



connect with a train leavi 
13:20 i 
tination at 
information dispenser, 

"\\ hat in thuu 

the traveller demanded. 
Then Barbre had to explain that 
anadian rail 
the twenty-four hour system of time. 

midnight and count inig thi 
straight through t" m 
The train the traveler desired to take 
left his connecting station a I 20 
o'clock in the afternoon and arrived 
at Hie destination at 10:10 o'i 
that night. 

«£• .$. 4, 

?5he Lady Dolphins 
A theater manager at the Players' 

Club, in New York, said of the school 
i if classical dancing that Miss Isadora 
Duncan conducts: 

"Miss Duncan hears some quaint 
remarks as she converses with her 
child pueils. One day, preparatory to 
the first lesson in a dolphin dance, 
she delivered to her class a little lec- 
ture on* this fish. She described' the 
grace of the dophin, and afterward 
she described its habits and mode 
of life. 

" 'And, children,' she said, 'a single 
dolphin will have two thousand off- 
spring.' 

A little girl gave a start. 

" 'And how about the married 
ones?" she gasped. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 
JK. Geometrical Fallacy? 

The somewhat intoxicated gentle- 
man was making toward the door of 
his home with much difficulty. Over 
and over again he stopped, fixed his 
eye carefully on the door in question, 
ran his eye solemnly along the dis- 
tance intervening between him and it, 
and started afresh, only to find him- 
self once more tacking from side to 
side, like a ship adrift on' the ocean. 

At last he stopped, thoroughly dis- 
gusted. 

"I'd like to know." he soliloquized, 
"wh-what old fool 'shaid shtraight 
line's shortes' distance between two- 
hie — points!" 



Desk* 



Desks 



Desks 



Desks 



Desk] 




Desk] 



Desks 



Desks 



Desks 



Bronson Desk Co. 541 && St 



14 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



A Contagious Idea 

A teller who was detailed to the 
woman's window in a .bank was asked 
by a portly German hausfrau for a 
new envelope for her bank book. 
The lady behind her, noting that her 
own envelope was a trifle dingy, asked 
also for a fresh envelope. 

No. 3 said "Me, too," or words to 
the same effect, and so it went down 
the line. 

When his patience and his stock of 
envelopes threatened to give out the 
teller determined to call a halt. A 
fastidiously dressed lady appeared at 
the window holding out a perfectly 
gloved hand. 

"I should like one too, plesae," said 
she. 

"One what, madam?" asked the 
teller. 

The lady flushed and began to look 
comical. 

"Why," she stammered, "what the 
other ladies had." — Outlook. 
* * * 
What is a Gopher 
"If you should ask a man from the 
Illinois prairies what a gopher was," 
said a man who acted as though he 
had asked a man from Illinois prairies 
the question, "he would say a gopher 
was a gray squirrel that burrowed in 
the ground. 

"If you should ask the same ques- 
tion of a man from prairies further 
west he'd say a gopher was a striped 
squirrel that lived in holes in the 
ground. 

"A Missouri farmer, though, would 
declare to you, if you asked him, that 
a gopher was a mole footed brown 
rat that digs its way under the ground 
in that State. 

"Of course we all know what sort 
of a rodent a California .gopher is." 

"A man from Georgia would proba- 
bly surprise you therefore when he 
assured you that a gopher was a 
snake familiar to everybody in that 
State, but not more perhaps than a 
Florida native would surprise you 
when he informed you that a gopher 
was a turtle. 

"The funny part of the matter is 
that every one of those informants 
would be right in his view. A go- 
pher is a gray squirrel that burrows, 
a striped squirrel that burrows, a rat 
that burrows, a snake that doesn't bur- 
row and a turtle that does, just ac- 
cording to the locality. The most in- 
teresting of all these is the burrow- 
ing turtle. 

"This turtle is a Florida institution. 
The Florida Cracker, and quite a good 
many Florida folks who hold them- 
selves a good deal higher up than the 
Cracker, dote on the gopher and think 
it the finest thing in the edible line 
ever created. 

"The gopher never leaves its burrow 
except to forage. If it can't get into 
a sweet potato patch it will graze on 
the wild grasses that abound in the 
localities where it lives. 

"The burrow of this gopher is in- 
variably shared by its occupant with 
a family of rattlesnakes or lizards. 
The gopher plainly delights in this 
deadly association, although it is it- 
self as mild and harmless as a dove. 



"No dweller in the same region with 
the Florida gopher ever goes abroad 
without a bag slung over his shoul- 
der. This is to carry gophers home 
in, for he is pretty sure to come across 
them out foraging. The moment the 
gopher detects the approach of dan- 
ger it shuts itself securely in its shell 
and the Cracker tumbles it into his 
bag. 

"The gophers are likewise trapped 
by digging holes in the ground close 
to the entrance of the burrow and 
sinking a box or barrel into it. When 
the gopher conies out it tumbles into 
the trap and can't get out. These 
queer turtles often weigh as much as 
thirty pounds. They are of prodi- 
gious strength, a large specimen be- 
ing able to rise on its legs with a man 
standing on its shell and walk under 
his weight." 

* * * 
•Idiotic Red Tape 
Six months ago a young Parisian 
proposed to a Mile. Eugenie and was 
accepted. The parents began collect- 
ing the mass of legal papers required 
for French marriages. 

Among the first to be obtained was 
Mile. Eugenie's birth certificate, and 
when they got it they found she was 
a boy. She is put down in the "register 
as a male, and a male she remains 
legally and administratively. 

Her parents pointed out, first, that 
she was obviously de facto a girl; sec- 
ond, that the Christian name of Eu- 
genie entered in the register was fem- 
inine and, third, that if she had been 
a boy .she would already have been 
called up for the conscription, being 
of age. The authorities replied that 
none of these arguments was legally 
and administratively valid and that 
she continues to be a boy de jure. 

The parents of Mile. Eugenie must 
set legal machinery in motion to es- 
tablish their contention. Administra- 
tive reports, procedure and a decision 
of the Courts, all at the parents' ex- 
pense, will be required before the law 
acknowledges Mile. Eugenie to be of 
the female sex and allows her to 
marry her young man. 

* * * 
Cause of Her Fear 

A wideawake reporter in Glasgow, 
Scotland, overheard the following con- 
versation early one morning between 
a couple on their way to market. The 
man was carrying a huge tub on his 
head and a live pig in a sack over his 
shoulder. 

"What are . ye feared for?" asked 
James. 

"I'm feared ye're gaun tae kiss me," 
she answered. 

"Hoo can I kiss ye, ye fule, when I 
have a tub on me heid, an' a pig on me 
back, an' haudin on wi' baith hands?" 
said angry James. 

"O, ye cuid easily put the pig on the 
grun, an' turn the tub on the tap o' it, 
an' sit doon on it, and put me doon 
aside ye. That's what makes me fear, 
Jamie." 

* ♦ ♦ 
Only a Coug'K 

"Hart O. Berg, manager for the 
Wrights; was talking at Le Mans 



about their skill," said a returned 
tourist. "Hart told me how Wilbur 
Wright got rather impatient with the 
aerial pilots he was teaching to run 
his machine. 

"One afternoon, according to Hart, 
a French count, the most promising 
of the learners, had a slip-up and fell. 
No harm was done, and the count 
excused himself on account of the 
high wind and so forth. Wright 
smiled sarcastically as he overhauled 
the damaged machine. Hart said it 
was just like a tenderfoot he once 
saw in Texas. 

""This tenderfoot thought he could 
ride, and in front of a lot of cow- 
boys mounted a pony. The pony 
soon threw him. A cowboy, helping 
him up, said: 

"'Hello! What threw you?' 

"'What threw me? Why, she 
bucked something fearful! Didn't you 
see her buck?' cried the tenderfoot. 

"'Buck?' said the cowboy. 'Rats! 
She only coughed.' " 

•fr * * 

Easy CKarity 

Frederick Townsend Martin, of 
New York, was discussing at a dinner 
the fund that he is raising for the 
great campaign against tuberculosis. 

"Now as Christmas approaches, ' 
said Mr. Martin, "my fund will grow 
fast. Christmas opens all hearts and 
pockets. It finds few American like 
— like the Spaniard." 

Fie shook his head and smiled. 

"A man once solicited for a charity 
in St. Sebastian," he said. "He asked 
a nobleman to subscribe. The noble- 



man shook his head and said haugh- 
tily: 

"I only give, sir, to the genuine, 
deserving poor." 

" 'And whom do you call the gen- 
uine deserving poor?" the other asked. 

" 'The genuine deserving poor,' ex- 
plained the nobleman, 'are those who 
are too proud to accept charity." 

* * * 

j\ Peculiar Couple 

Conversation had turned to the sub- 
ject of two men, utterly dissimilar, 
who nevertheless roomed together. 
One of these men was generally con- 
ceded to be a "freak." His name was 
John. 

"John and Jim are certainly a queer 
pair," opined somebody. 

"John and anybody are a queer 
pair," opined somebody else. 

Poor John! 

* * * 

A Change of Tune 

"Mamma, I'm tired of going to 
school." 

"What's the matter, Willie?" 

"Th' teacher" 

"Now don't you say a word against 
you teacher, Willie. I've no doubt 
you annoy her dreadfully, and she 
seems like a very nice sort of per- 
son." 

"Well, she said this mornin' that 
she didn't think I had much of a 
bringin' up at homej and.' " 

"Wait! Did she say that? Well, 
of all the coarse impudence! Yon 
sha'n't go back there another day!" 

Exit Willie, grinning. — Cleveland 
Plain Dealer. 




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PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



Mixed Destinations 

urch 

of tin- 

the quarter 

ly and 
him 

; ion." 
ppc<l the other, with de- 
of the 
kind. I gave the money to 
and row it can go to the devil!" 
♦ + + 



ebut of ihe Green- 
Monster 



?yed 



Adam — I couldn't believe my eyes 
when I first beheld j 

(wrathfully) — So you were ex- 
pecting her woman, were you? 
+ + + 
Dental 
The character-; in this tale are called 
A. and B. A. has a Frightful ti 
ache. B. is playing the part of con- 
soler. 

"My dear A,." says I! . "you must 
uccumb this way to the pain You 
must not thrash around and bury 
your head in yonder pillow and in- 
dulge in such inelegant and thunder- 
ous language. Be a stoic, A, be a 

V -i 

"Rats!" he roars. "Stoicism leaves 
off where t ha he be . ins." 

Epigram! 

* * * 

&he Alphabet in a Sentence 

The following is the shortest se»- 
. containing all the letters of the 
alphabet: Pack my box with five doz- 
en liqu< ir jugs, 

*f> «£ •£■ 

Thwarted Her 

"I believe, just for a joke." says the 
wife, "that l'U show you folks the 
love-letter John sent me with his first 
Christmas present to me." 

"Yes, do," suggested John grimly. 
Winking at the guests; "and I'll go 
upstairs to the attic and get that hand 
painted necktie you sent me at the 
same time." 

4. + + 

Ash Any Yale Man 

Shocked Father (laying down his 
yellow paper) — What rascally boys 
those Yale fellows are! What won't 
they do next? Why, I would send mj 
son io Hades sooner than to Yale. 

Dr. Bones la Yale graduate) — No 
doubt, -ir. it would be easier for y^:i 
to get him in. 1 ladley's examinations 
are harder than the devil's! — The 
Bi ihemian. 

+ + * 

A New Plant 

Gushing Young Woman (to bar- 
nik'i at gardt n party )— Oh. Sir 
James. 1 hear you have an acetylene 
plant, and I simply adore tropical 
flowers! — Punch. 



Egress Wanted 

•he culprits hah 

in New York 
v in,. ruing there wa 
man— who ' 

trouble to the police the Saturday 

magistrate regarded the 1 ris- 
with mingled curiosity and in- 

you're the man that 
much trou 

"1 understand that 
■lieemen to lock you 

up." 

"Vis. your honor." responded the 
with a broad grin: "hut it 
take only wan to let me OU Hal 

Weekly. 

* * * 

A Great Difference 

"Margaret, it wa- very naughty of 

you to make such a fuss. You said 

if I'd buy you that new dollie you'd 

the dentist's without a murmur. ' 

"I didn't murmur, muvver. 1 

screamed." — Lippincott's. 

* ♦ ♦ 
Coloring; an Abyssinian Bride 

Western brides have an easier time 
than their Abyssinian sisters. On the 
occasion of her marriage an Abyssin- 
ian bride has to change her skin. 

From ebony she has to become the 
color of cafe an lait. To accomplish 
this the expectant bride is shut up in 
1 room for three months. She is cov- 
ered with woolen stuff with the ex- 
ception of her head, then they burn 
certain green and fragrant branches. 
The fumes wdiich they produce de- 
stroy the original skin and in its place 
comes the new skin, soft and clear as 
a baby's. The elders of the family 
feed the young woman with nutritive 
forcemeat bulls. 

Time I 

"Are you waiting for me. dear?" 
she said, coming downstairs at last, 
fixing her hat. "Waiting?" exclaimed 
the impatient man. "No; not waiting 
— sojourning." — Yonkers Statesman. 

* * * 
Brothers 

Judge (about to sentence) — Pris- 
oner, you have used this poor, half- 
witted fellow most unmercifully. 
You have beaten him most cruelly. 

Prisoner (surlily) — He attacked me 
first; besides, he is a rascal, and pave 
me no end of trouble on the farm. 
It's not my fault, his being an idiot, 
my lord. 

Judge (severely) — You should re- 
member, prisoner, that idiots, after all 
arc men like you and me. — Tit-Bits. 

+ * * 

Had Damages Enough 
"You want to get damages, I sup- 
pose," said the lawyer to whom Mrs. 
Donovan's husband escorted her on 
the day after she and Mrs. Leahy had 
indulged in a little difference of opin- 
ion. 

"Damages!" echoed Mrs. Donovan, 
shrilly. "Haven't I got damages 
enough already, man? What I'm 
afther is satisfaction. — Youth's Com- 
panion 



5>So Yellow Streah 
"Pa " 

'Will, what no 

"What- 'atavism'?" 

"Atavism is why a descendant of an 

old family rob-, .1 bank." — Cleveland 

Leader, 

+ * + 

Unimportant 

The captain of a certain yacln had 
evinced an anxiety touching a mishap 
to tli craft thai at once attracted the 
attention of a fair passenger on board. 

"What's the trouble, captain?" asked 
she. 

"The fact i-. ma'am." was the re- 
sponse, "our rudder's broken." 

"Oh. I shouldn't worry .about that." 
-aid the lady. "Being under the water 
nearly all the time, no one will no- 
tice that it's gone." — Harper's Week- 

ly- 

f + ♦ 

Overheard in the Law Courts 

Counsel (to witness): "How long is 
it since there has been a pig kept in 
the sty?" 

Witness: "I don't think there has 
been a pig there since my eldest 
brother left." — Daily News. 
* * * 

Preaching vs. Practice 

I once heard a clergyman boasting 
in a railway compartment of having 
swindled the railway company of two 
shillings by passing his bike through 
the barrier without payment. 

The following Sunday he said 
"Thon shalt not steal" in very solemn 



meant it. — R. B. Slithers in the 
ion 

♦ + + 

Not Always 
"More money 1 
than for nei 1 

Oh, I don't kuo'A It', costing the 

i hinesi $4,000,1 

pero "— Cleveland Plain I >< 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

TShe Other Clan 

\ genl [eman was I ra \ eling in the 
north of Scotland. When he reaced 
his destination he discovered that he 

had left his waterproof in the com- 
partment. He hurried a- the train was 
leaving, and shouted : 

"Is there a black mackintosh in 
here?" 

One of the gentlemen replied: "No, 
they are all Macgregors." — Tid Bits. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

His Choice 

"Of course, Tommy," said the Sun- 
day-school teacher, "you'l like to be 
an angel, wouldn't you?" 

"Well — er — yes'm," replied Tommy, 
"but I'd like to wait till I can be a 
full-grown angel with gray whiskers " 
— Philadelphia Press. 

Fine looking old gentleman." "Yes, 
but he was never known to igive a 
man his word that he didn't break." 
"Dishonest, eh!" "Nope, stutters." — 
Houston Post. 




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PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



Vol. VI. Mo. 2. 



Los Angeles, California, January 9, 1909. 



tO Cents $2.00 a Year 



Published Every Saturday 

Lissner Building, Los Angeles, California, by the 

PACIFIC OUTLOOK COMPANY 

Subscription price $2.00 a year in advance. 

Single copies 10 cents at all news stands. 

NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERS— The Pacific Out- 
look is mailed to subscribers through the Los 
Angeles Post Office every Friday, and should 
be delivered in every part of the city by Satur- 
day's post. If for any reason it should be de- 
layed, or be delivered in poor condition, sub- 
scribers will confer a favor upon the publishers 
by giving them immediate notice. 

Entered at second. class matter April s, 1907, at tbc poslomce at 
Los Aofclci, California, under the act of Congress of March 3, 1879. 

The Editor of the PACIFIC Outlook cannot guarantee to return 
manuscripts .hough he will endeavor to do so if stamps for- that purpose 
are inclosed with them. If your manuscript is valuable, keep a copy of it. 



THE PACIFIC OUTLOOK'S POLICY 
The Pacific Outlook desires to state unequivo- 
cally that it is not the organ of any creed, sect, 
political party, organization, corporation or per- 
son, but is absolutely free and untrammelled in 
its associations. 

It stands unqualifiedly, and without fear, for 
that which it believes to be true, clean, honest 
and right in human affairs — political, secular, 
commercial and industrial; and in its columns 
will always maintain an unprejudiced and im- 
partial attitude in its discussion of all subjects 
of universal or local interest. 

GEORGE BAKER ANDERSON, Editor 

Just a Thought 

Use, do not abuse; neither abstinence 
nor excess renders man happy. — Voltaire. 



COMMENT 



DIGS HIS OWN PIT 



A FEW weeks ago Senator Perkins ad- 
dressed a letter to Assemblyman Callan of 
San Francisco soliciting- his vote for United 
States Senator. Mr. Callan refused his sup- 
port of the Perkins candidacy, giving numer- 
ous reasons therefor, all based on the sena- 
tor's official record. Most of .Mr. Callan's 
reasons were grounded upon the Perkins 
attitude toward corporations as shown by 
the Congressional Record. 

A few days ago Senator Perkins replied 
to Mr. Callan's letter, offering a labored 
explanation of seine of his votes against the 
interests of the people. In the majority of 
cases he explains that he voted for or 
against because certain other senators, 
whom he specifies, voted that way, or, in 
effect, because they were "Democratic 
measures," or. in other cases, because the 
measures were, or were not, "administra- 
tion" measures, lie gives the following ex- 
planation of his vote against La Follette's 
propiosal to prohibit judges from owning 
stocks in railroads that are parties in cases 
before them for trial : 



"This is an amendment by Senator La 

F llette. The feeling i f the Senate was ex- 
pressed 1 • \ Senator Hale", (a friend of the 
railroads and an enemy of the administra- 
tion), "who said: 'Mr. President, I have 
some respect for the judiciary of the United 
States. I think there ought to he a halt in 
the Senate somewhere, so I move to lav the 
amendment on the table, and upon that mo- 
tion I ask for the ayes and noes.' And," 
continues Senator Perkins, "the amend- 
ment was talded by a vote of forty to twen- 
ty-seven, those in favor of the amendment 
being with one or two exceptions Demo- 
crats. On this question my vote was re- 
corded on the same side as that of Senators 
Lodge, Spooner, Burrows and other promi- 
nent Republican lawyers and friends of the 
bill." 

This particular bill gave FJnited States 
judges permission to continue to own stocks 
in railroads having cases before them. In 
Senator Perkins's judgment, it would ap- 
pear, federal judges should be excepted from 
the g'eneral rule that a judge should not be 
interested in a matter upon which he is 
called to pass judgment. Senator Perkins's 
explanation that he voted against this bill 
for the further reason that those supporting 
it were Democrats is puerile. Has he no 
judgment of his own? Is he unable to reach 
decisions on matters of this character with- 
out ascertaining first how others are going 
to decide? Does he simply float with the 
tide? Or is he just a plain time-server for 
the corporations? 

Senator Perkins might better have left his 
fountain pen in his vest pocket. As an ex- 
plainer he is hardly the peer of the average 
truant schoolboy. But, then, there are some 
things that never can be explained. 

Senator Perkins has digged a pit for him- 
self with his pen. 

* * ♦ 

THE LIE OF THE GAMBLERS 



C. T. BOOTS, one of the best known 
American breeders of thoroughbred horses, 
has given the lie to the racetrack gamblers 
who argue that their "business" should be 
permitted because it encourages the produc- 
li-in of high-bred horses. Mr. Boots, who 
owns the Elm wood farm, declares that no 
horse-owner can possibly support a stable 
by prize-winning. He states that the total 
given in prizes at Emeryville is but $18,000 
a week, while it costs $21,000 to maintain 
the horses at the track, the owners of the 
horses bearing the net loss. He asserts that 
this condition has been brought about by 



the racetrack proprietors deliberately for the 
purpose of forcing horse owners Pi gamble. 

Arcadia and Emeryville are, there! 
not racetracks so much as they are gam- 
bling joints. The strung suspicion of the 
average citizen, that gambling is the first 
consideration of these Falsely-named 
"sports", is confirmed. The chief argument 
of the gamblers falls to the ground in 
smithereens. He is accused of being a thief, 
because he plays a "sure thing". He is now 
accused of being a liar — and we think both 
accusations are susceptible of proof. 

In a letter to the San Francisco Bulletin 
Mr. Boots says : 

Never in the whole history of racing in Ameri- 
ca has horse racing been in such i\ deplorable 
condition'as it is on the Pacific Coast today. Tt is 
in the hands of a racing trust, a trust that comes 
before the world and heralds itself as engaged in 
the improvement of the breed of horses. The 
headquarters of this trust is in a little incorpor- 
ated town of its own called Emeryville. Tts prin- 
cipal plants are at Emeryville, Ingleside, Tan- 
foran, Ascot, Arcadia and Seattle, with minor 
leprous spots in Montana and Washington. , 

The management of the trust is in skillful 
hands, hands that have been trained to do their 
master's bidding, and so well are they doing it 
that it is only a matter of a short time until the 
magnificent thoroughbred industry of California 
will be a thing of the past, for it is impossible to 
produce sound offspring from drugged and worn- 
out narents. And the drugging of horses is 
winked at by the racing trust of California. 

Owners of baby racers are encouraged to race 
them as early and often as possible, for the earlier 
and oftener they run and the larger the fields the 
better it is for the gambling-mad trust, a gam- 
bling trust not satisfied with its own tracks, but 
a gambling trust to promote gambling in every 
saloon and cigar stand in every town in the wide 
land that is so far away from the tracks that its 
gambling-crazed votaries cannot come and pay 
the loll of $1.50 at the gates of the gambling bell 
owned and operated by the most heartless and 
unprincipled of all trusts; a trust that is driving 
men and women into drunkards', paupers', sui- 
cides' and murderers' graves every day. 

It takes little children, almost babes, weighing 
only fifty or sixty pounds, makes them bond 
shoes and places them where it is impossible 
for them to have any associates or associations 
other than the worst. It encourages the sleek, 
well-dressed villain, gives him an owner's or a 
guest's badge, so that he can have free ace 
all privileges and pass as a position on the tracks, 
while only too often he i- citable tout 

living off some poor woman whom he has helped 
send on the way to hell and is now perhaps look- 
ing for a younger and fairer one whom he may 
put in the place of the fading one. 

If you are not a gambling man you are not 
wanted, for they will tell you that they cannot 
race unless you will gamble. Yes. gamble 
own money, gamble your employe" 
gamble your wile's and your mother's m 
only gamble, and. above all, gamble it on the 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



losers, for if you don't gamble it on the losers 
the game can't last. The trust tries to arrange 
the program so that the public will bet on the 
losers; the inspired officials call it making a con- 
test. If the card does not appear to be one on 
which the public will bet on the losers they will 
declare it off. 

No honest man, no simply decent man, no 
self-respecting man, now a member of the 
State Legislature, can stand for the further 
maitttainance of this loathsome species of 
robbery, which the gamblers try to convince 
us is "sport". Every member who fails to 
support the bill introduced this session by 
the anti-gambling organizations should be 
a marked man, in whom no public con- 
fidence hereafter should be reposed. 
* * * 
MODERATE DRINKING 



IN addressing the Boston No-License 
League ex-President Eliot of Harvard ad- 
mitted that all his life he had been what is 
called a moderate drinker — that is, he has 
used beer and wine on occasion, though 
never habitually. He has never been con- 
scious of any ill-effects from this degree of 
indulgence, and he recognizes the truth of 
the Biblical saying that "wine maketh glad 
the heart of man." Of late years, however, 
he has been paying careful attention to the 
experiments made in the physiological lab- 
oratories of Germany and America, and he 
has now changed his views as to the in- 
nocuousness of alcohol, even when used as 
he has used it. He doubts the desirability 
of the sort of cheer that wine produces, and 
his present conclusion is that even moderate 
drinking is "inexpedient." 

Dr. Eliot uses the English language as 
he has used intoxicants when he declares 
that moderate drinking is "inexpedient" — 
very, very temperately. He admits that 
liquors, even when used but occasionally, 
are not innocuous, and yet their use is "in- 
expedient". Alcohol, no matter in how 
small a quantity it be taken into the human 
system, is admittedly injurious. Isn't its 
use, even its most moderate use, something 
more, then, than "inexpedient"? 
* * * 

DIRECT PRIMARIES 



One thing is certain. That is that the 
American people are going to have the di- 
rect primary method of nomination. It 
comes sooner in some States than in others, 
but it is coming, and it cannot be stopped. 

Since it was inaugurated, only one State 
has repealed the act, and that State was 
Montana, where it applied only to a few 
county officials and had not been generally 
adopted through the State. The special 
commission brought the subject to the at- 
tention of the last legislature, but their re- 
port was referred to the coming legislature. 

It is interesting and valuable to observe 
that since our legislature of 1907 assembled, 
says the Hartford Courant, the direct pri- 
mary system lias been made law in Illinois. 



Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Missouri, Nebras- 
ka, New Jersey, North Dakota, South Da- 
kota and Washington. Almost a quarter or 
the union has acted since we had the chance 
to act. It is conceded that New York State, 
under the influence of Governor Hughes, 
will adopt such legislation at the coming 
session. The only question is as to when 
this State will fall into line. 

How many people in the State have not 
heard the expression "If we only had the 
primary here I" You hear it every day now 
with regard to the senatorship, although it 
does not come from those who want an anti- 
administration senator chosen. What it 
means is that the people have a full and fair 
chance to express their preferences. When 
they get it they hold on to it. It involves 
extra duties and makes its demands, but 
these are only the duties and demands of 
citizenship under self-government. 
* * * 
HOME OR INSTITUTION 



The advantage to a young child of living 
in family in preference to existing on dole in 
a public or private orphanage, cannot be 
questioned by any one familiar with cold 
comfort of parochial or state institutions. 
The difference between the two conditions 
is that of being known as "Fred" or as "No. 
Three." The Children's Home Society of 
California for several years has undertaken 
the task of finding homes for dependent 
children. This method of succoring orphans 
has been called to the attention of President 
Roosevelt and he has called together a con- 
vention which is to meet shortly in Wash- 
ington. The attendance of Mr. Julius A. 
Brown, the president of the Home Society 
in this city has been requested by Mr. 
Roosevelt. This week Mr. O. V. Rice has 
resigned- his position as superintendent of 
the society in Los Angeles and his place will 
be taken at once by Mr. Herbert W. Lewis. 
Mr. Lewis is unusually well equipped for 
the work, having had the advantage of long 
experience, in directing government aid to 
young children, the care of whom has been 
thrust upon the state. While in Minneso- 
ta for six years he had charge of the State 
Institution for Dependent Children and 
during that time placed one thousand boys 
and girls in private homes. In 1892 he went 
to Washington to act as manager of the 
board of Children's Guardians. President 
McKinley appointed Mr. Lewis Superintend- 
ent of Charities for the District of Colum- 
bia, a position which he relinquished, at his 
own request, at the end of seven years, in 
order to make way for a commission which 
he was instrumental in establishing. For 
one year he was immigration agent for the 
Children's Aid Society of New York, which 
sends many native children to homes in the 
western states. The climate of New York 
not suiting him he removed to San Fran- 
cisco where he assisted in forming the Chil- 
dren's Agency through which fifteen char- 



itable societies act in placing in homes, chil- 
ren for which they are responsible. 

Mr. Lewis has assumed the generalship 
of those forces in California who are striv- 
ing to find children for homes and homes 
for children. He is a valuable recruit. 

On another page of this issue of the Pa- 
cific Outlook will be found an article from 
the pen of Mr. Lewis describing the present 
condition of dependent children in this 
state. Institutional children seem to be ab- 
normally deficient in essential human traits. 
Having formed the habit of moving in 
sq'uads they lack initiative and later in life 
they swell the ranks of inefficient clerks and 
routine workers. The placing of children 
in homes seems to vitalize their individu- 
ality and give force to those personal traits 
which go to make a man of mark. 

This effort of the Home Society has an 
economic as well as a charitable significance 
in that it will decrease the subsidy which 
the state now pays to- private charities for 
doing work which properly belongs to the 
government itself. 

* * * 

FAIR PAY 



THE opinion of Attorney General Webb 
in the matter of the increase of salary for 
state officials provided for by popular vote 
last November is interesting. By a pro- 
vision of the code adopted in 1872 members 
of the assembly, under the old Constitution, 
received ten dollars per day and three dol- 
lars for every twenty miles traveled. By 
the Constitution of 1879 the per diem pay 
was reduced from ten* to eight dollars and 
mileage was put on a basis of ten cents per 
mile. At the last election the pay of assem- 
blymen was made one thousand dollars per 
session. 

For his guidance Controller Nye asked the 
attorney-general for an opinion ->f the con- 
stitutional amendment, and the latter ex- 
presses- the opinion that the second statute 
must be interpreted by reference to the first. 
In other words the presidential electors of 
California, instead of receiving one thousand 
dollars per year, are entitled to but ten dol- 
lars per day and mileage at the rate of three 
dollars (for every twenty miles jtjraveled. 
In accordance with the decision the presi- 
dential electors will be entitled to mileage as 
follows : 

U. S. Grant, Jr., San Diego, 573 miles. 
$174; S. M. Shortridge, San Francisco, 90 
miles, $27 ; G. W. Dwinnell, Montague, 288 
miles, $87; Alden Anderson, Sacramento, 1 
mile, $3; F. M. Smith, Oakland, 84 miles, 
$27; H. G. W. Dinkelspiel, San Francisco, 
90 miles, $27; D. O. Druffel, Santa Clara, 
128 miles, $39; T. J. Field, Monterery, 203 
miles, $63; Byron Erkenbrecher, Los An- 
geles, 447 miles, $135; L. M. .King, Red- 
lands, 514 miles, $156. To each of these 
amounts must be added ten dollars for the 
per diem allowance. 

While ten dollars seems a small amount 









PACIFIC OUTLOO K 



ich a man, 
Klinple, as Ulj .rant. Jr., or to 

S. M. Shortridge • :n Anders 

must be remembered that these gentlemen 
have very littli itial elec- 

tee they are elected to per- 
form is far from arduous. At the current 
rate ■ r labor (2.75 per day would 

be ample reward for each of them. It i- 
to be hoped that none of them will com- 
plain. 

+ ♦ ♦ 

BAD MANNERS 



LADY Auckland lias written a book, soon 
published in London, in which she 
speaks her mind in regard to Americans in 
general and New Yorkers in particular. 
Lady Auckland made an exhaustive, and 
possibly exhausting, study of us before she 
sat down and took her pen in hand. She 
did not hurry through the country in a Pull- 
man, catching hasty glimpses of us from 
various viewpoints, as many of our critics 
have done. She took plenty of time. She 
went to the very heart of things, regardless 
of time and money. She remained here six 
whole weeks ! Very appropriately she calls 
her book "Six Weeks in New York". Dra- 
matized it ought to meet with success equal 
with that accorded "Ten Nights in a Bar- 
room". 

"New Yorkers," says Lady Auckland in 
a sweeping phrase, "are impossible. The 
richest — and I met crowds over there — are 
terribly vulgar. Now they import English 
butlers and English footmen to wait upon 
them, and, believe me, one would find the 
manners of the servants' hall more congenial 
than those in the drawing-room. * ■ * * 
I have one good thing to say about New 
York, and that is in praise of the climate, 
and when I have praised the climate I can 
praise little else. Everything is inordinately 
mean, and the system of inflated tipping is 
paramount." 

Apropos of Lady Auckland's strictures 
upon certain Americans the London corre- 
spondent of the New York Times writes : 

"On board the steamer which brought her 
back to England there happened to be a 
friend of mine, an American of cosmopolitan 
experience, who, in speaking of the incidents 
of the trip, remarked : 'Among the passen- 
gers was a certain Lady Auckland, who 
gave the most appalling exhibition of bad 
manners it has ever been my misfortune to 
see'." 

+ + + 

Size of Babylon 

The report of the German Oriental So- 
ciety on the extensive explorations carried 
out on the ruins of ancient Babylon, recent- 
ly issued under the editorship of Dr. Fried- 
rich Delitzsch, is a document of more than 
usual interest. Perhaps one of the most 
astonishing discoveries in the field of topo- 
graphical research has been the tracing of 



the walls of the city and the ascertainment 

of the true size of the great city. \\ onder- 
ful descriptions of the size of Babylon have 
been given, based chiefly on the hearsay evi- 
dence of Herodotus, in ancient limes, and 
the theories of the late Dr. Oppert. These 
writers made the city a vast parallelogram, 
surrounded by a wall fifty miles long and a 
hundred feet high, with one hundred g 
and bisected by the Euphrates. According 
to them the area was about as large as Lon- 
don and Paris together, or some forty square 
miles. All this wild conjecture has been 
swept away, 

The exploration of the walls commenced 
at the Babil fort, and here was found a wall 
twenty-five feet thick, with buttresses every 
sixty feet. The line of the wall was traced 
to the southeast angle, unil it bends to the 
west and joins the great quay on the banks 
of the river. This portion was pierced by 
only one gate, the gate of Isar, flanked by 
tall towers decorated with friezes of lions 
and dragons in encaustic tile work. On the 
north it was traced to the river bank. The 
whole enclosure covered an area of a little 
over one square mile, or roughly that of 
our City of London. 

In the Kasr or "palace" mound were 
found the remains of two great palaces, one 
built by Natupalassar, the other by Nebu- 
chadnezzar. Both were most complex in 
plan, containing hundreds of rooms for the 
accommodation of retainers, officials in the 
royal family. The two palaces are separated 
by a street. The later or new edifice is on 
the eastern side and consists of several 
groups of chambers arranged around quad- 
rangles separated by strong walls and gate- 
ways. The largest of these is a royal 
quadrangle, entered by a double gateway. 

On the south side of this square is the 
northern facade of the royal audience cham- 
ber or Selamlik. This facade was forty feet 
wide and had been richly decorated with 
floral designs in enamelled "brick in yellow, 
white, blue and black. The audience hall 
measures 60 by 170 feet and on the south 
side is a deep alcove with a dais in front, 
where the royal throne was placed. 

What a historic chamber this is ! Here 
Nebuchadnezzar had sat and received hom- 
age on his conquest of Jerusalem. Per- 
haps in this very chamber Belshazzar's 
feast was held and the plaster covered walls 
had reecived the terrible message. Here 
Cyrus the Conqueror was enthroned in June 
538 B. C, and perhaps in this very chamber 
Alexander of Macedon held the fatal revels 
after his overthrow of the Empire of the 
East. 

Nebuchadnezzar speaks of richly decor- 
ated palaces and temples, but the one pre- 
vailing feature of all the buildings was the 
dull, monotonous brickwork, void of decora- 
tion. If gold and silver and precious stones, 
cedar and cypress wood, had been used, all 
disappeared long ago. 



CHILE CON CARNE 



Bv sis 

The Philosophy of Life. — I and 

every hour we have to be making cho 

times the matter lo be decided is one 
like the choice of a profession, which will ef- 
fect our whole future life, and which de- 
mands months of careful thought. & 
times it is a mere trivial choice of what we 
shall eat or drink, wdiat we shall say or do 
for our amusement, which is settled upon 
the instant and then forgotten. This prin- 
ciple we call a man's philosophy of life. A 
child can perhaps get on without such a 
philosophy, content to decide each question 
under the controlling impulse or controlling 
force of the moment. A man cannot — at 
least not unless he is content to remain in- 
tellectually and morally a child. He cannot 
act on one principle at one moment and an- 
other principle at another moment, and ex- 
pect anybody to trust him. He will have no 
stability of character; nay, if we are to de- 
fine character as the habit of doing the same 
thing under different circumstances, he will 
be destitute of character itself. If you know 
what sort of principles a man is governed 
by, you can tell what to rely upon. 



Fame. — There was once a man and he had 
a wife. Having said this we depart from the 
customs of tract writing, though still main- 
taining a high moral tone just the same. 
The man was a professor of dead languages 
and he loved to recite classic poetry in the 
vernacular. His wife said it was all Greek 
to her. He insisted that fully half of it was 
Latin, but she left him and got a divorce 
just the same. She later choked to death 
on a piece of one of her own finger nails — 
which is the worst kind of bad manners. 
But, then, the poor woman must have had 
a hard life. Meanwhile the professor taught 
Sanskrit in the best colleges and delivered 
yearly lectures in many cities. He also 
wrote some books. In fact, he was an emi- 
nent, distinguished, profound, and alto- 
gether a very remarkable man. And then he 
died. They put a simple headstone over 
him, bearing the customary chaste though 
trite sentiments, and regarded him as gone 
to join the dead languages. But a man's 
works live after him. All is not forgotten at 
the grave. Certainly not. The years rolled 
on apace and one day two visitors paused 
before the simple stone. 

"And why was he?" asked one. 

"Why, Carrie," said the other, "how can 
you be so ignorant? He was the man whose 
divorced wife choked to death on a little 
bit of finger nail." 

So the moral is — cut your nails. Don't 
bite 'em. 



Philosophy Simplified. — A number of stu- 
dents at college were busily "grinding" for 
the final examination in philosophy. Each 



4 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



one of them was supposed to be especially 
well up on a particular branch of the sub- 
ject, so each was called upon in turn to en- 
lighten his fellows on that branch. Thus 
the man who knew all about Aristotle's 
views expatiated upon them, and the Plato 
expert held forth, and the Descartes man 
and the Leibnitz man and the Fichte man all 
had their say, until it was the turn of him 
who claimed to know all about Immanuel 
Kant. He looked over his copious notes, 
solemnly cleared his throat, and remarked : 
"Well, fellows, you see it's this way. Kant 
believed that everything- in the universe was 
a mess except the absolute, and that that — 
that the absolute was — well, he believed 
that was a mess, too !" 



Origin of the Club Sandwich. — Alan John- 
stone, the British minister to Copenhagen, 
is said to have originated the famous club 
sandwich. The story runs that on going to 
the club one night between midnight and 
daybreak he found the cafe closed, the cooks 
gone, and being nearly famished, he in- 
vaded the larder, toasted himself some thick 
slices of bread, sliced them through, but- 
tered them while hot and laid thereon every- 
thing he found in the refrigerator, cold 
chicken, ham and lettuce, with a spoonful 
of mayonnaise. The result was such an 
epicurean discovery as is not often made, 
but the story was too good to keep ; he con- 
fided the recipe to his cronies and it straight- 
way became one of the popular dishes of the 
club menu. 



The Exact Quantity. — The host was one 
of the newly rich of the vainglorious kind, 
and he was explaining to his dinner guests 
the cost of the dessert. "This pineapple, 
f'rinstance, cost me $12 and — er — Mr. Jone*.. 
can I offer you a slice?'' "Yes, Sir, you 
may," rejoined Jones. "I will take about 35 
cents' worth." 



Feeling Her Way. — "Don't you think my 
daughter is a fine pianist?" demanded Mr. 
Binks, as Miss Binks stumbled and blun- 
dered through an elaborate selection. "She 
certainly plays with a great deal of feeling," 
was the discreet reply of the listener. 



Older, has landed the job of assistant ser- 
geant-at-arms .of the lower house of the 
State Legislature. Special advices from 
Sacramento are to the effect that the great- 
est activity in the assembly chamber at the 
opening of the session Monday permeated 
the atmosphere immediately surrounding 
the person of Mr. Cohen. The air in prox- 
imity to his aureola certainly was lustrous. 
I wonder if Bennie is holding down two jobs 
at once — one a county job, one under state 
patronage. 



Postcard Craze Is Dying. — German manu- 
facturers of souvenir postcards held a meet- 
ing in Berlin a few days ago to consider the 
state of the trade, which it was agreed was 
going from bad to worse. The consensus of 
opinion among the long-faced delegates was 
that the slump in the postcard craze in the 
United States was the chief cause of their 
troubles. One or two years ago cards made 
in Germany were shipped to America lit- 
erally by the million. Nowadays, the manu- 
facturers state, they rejoice if they can get 
orders for as many thousands. The meet- 
ing came to the lugubrious conclusion that 
the postcard industry had seen its best days. 



To Dine Without Thought. — Sir William 
Treloar, the Lord Mayor of London, gives 
the following advise to those who are 
obliged to dine out officially, consuming ban- 
quets which end in wisdom. "The first 
thing is to learn what dishes it is advisable 
to pass by. I make it a rule to eat no 
butcher's meat at a public dinner. When 
these courses are on, I fall back on, say, po- 
tatoes, peas, or some other vegetable. Then 
I observe two other rules : I do not smoke 
and I do not drink spirits. I am not a total 
abstainer, for I appreciate and drink good 
wine. Then I do not begin to prepare my 
speech until I am on my legs. Some men 
ruin their digestion because they are think- 
ing over jokes and elaborating epigrams." 



Bennie Cohen's Promotion— Bennie Cohn, 
constable, associate kidnaper of Fremont 



More Diamonds Than Glass. — It is claimed 
that the late Mr. Harry Barnato was the 
• real founder of the family fortunes, although 
it was his younger brother "Barney", whose 
wonderful ability amassed these fortunes, 
whose name is better known ; but it was 
Harry who first settled in Cape Town in 
the Cape and induced his younger brother 
to join him there. Harry Barnato, who was 
at this time known by his real name of 
Isaacs, had a slight knowledge of legerde- 
main and sleight of hand, and on his first 
arrival on the Fields he fell back on this as 
a means of support whilst he surveyed the 
surroundings, but it proved a dismal failure. 
There is still extant an old handbill of his 
advertising a performance he was giving in 
the galvanized iron shed which did duty for 
a town hall. There were no printing presses 
on the Fields in these days and the letters 
are roughly printed by hand which must 
have been a considerable task as these bills 
were scattered round the camp generally. 
Soon after this Harry was joined by his 
more famous brother, but it was a long 
while yet before they were able to embark 
in business as diamond buyers. "I didn't 
know a diamond from a piece of glass when 
I first started buying,," Barnato once said, 
"but I took it for granted that diamonds 
were more plentiful than glass, and it came" 
off all right." 

* + * 

Direct Nominations 
By Cmnton Rogers Woodruff 

The fight for the direct nomination of 
candidates has practically b.een.won. The 
principle has been established in nearly two- 



thirds of the states. It will be some time 
before all of them will fall into- line, and be- 
fore the details will be fully worked out, 
and before the various communities will be 
adjusted to the new conditions, but with the 
legislation already on the statute books and 
pending, and the public sentiment which has 
been aroused, the -movement has gotten a 
momentum which will carry it to eventual 
success. Five great states haye swung into 
line this year — Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Mis- 
souri and Washington. Pennsylvania and 
Wisconsin are committed to the principle. 
Governor Hughes has urged it upon the 
New York Legislature, and will unques- 
tionably carry it through at the next ses- 
sion, and so we might continue the review of 
the situation. In 1905 twenty-five states 
passed primary law, and each year will see a 
further batch, extending and perfecting the 
system. And so grows the effort to purify 
and democratize the electoral machinery of 
the country. 

* * * 

'Uhe Simple Life 

By Chancemor Von Buemw 

We have been poor too long not to suc- 
cumb to the temptation to rival our richer 
neighbors in luxury and in comfortable liv- 
ing. I will speak plainly — I say that we are 
living in an age of luxury, and in an age 
which overrates the value and importance of 
material enjoyment, which must inspire 
with serious anxiety every one of us who 
has at heart the true civilization of the mind 
and spirit of the nation, which is its highest 



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ire the faults 

i us must iu all res 

imical mode of life 
and to greater simplicity. Yes, all of us; 1 

more 
able and more hum ind it suits 

; all nations better than the 
life we are now leading. 

♦ + + 

A Happening on the Coast 
The latest verdict of guilty in the case of 
Abe Ruef is. of course merely an incident : 
one of the happenings in a contest which 
i more than thirty months ago ami no 
end of which is. as yet, in sight. That 
learned counsel will overlook no chan 
make void the verdict is a matter of course. 
They may he as successful as they were in 
ase of Mayor Schmitz. 
The important question isn't whether one 
Ruef shall spend a certain period in the 
penitentiary, either. Two years and a half 
ago an extensive and exceedingly nauseous 
of civic corruption in San Francisco 
was disclosed by the confessions of a num- 
ber of ' bribe-takers. Since then there has 
never been any question of the actual guilt 
of Ruef and Schmitz. The only question of 
actual guilt is raised in another quarter — 
by or on behalf of men of wealth, for whose 
benefit tiie bribes were given. Of late there 
has been something of a disposition — shared 
by gentlemen who have been indicted for 
bribe-giving — to regard the whole affair as a 
misfortune of the vulgar which it were bet- 
ter to say no more about. 

The only important question concerns the 
bribe-givers. If they cannot be reached the 
personal outcome to Ruef and his like is 
of little general consequence. — Saturday 
Evening Post. 

* ♦ + 

A Continent THat "Was 

Some 200 or 300 miles south of New Zea- 
land are a number of little rocky islands that 
have long been marked on the maps, though 
not much attention has been given to them 
otherwise. They are known as Snares. 
Auckland, Disappointment , and Campbell 
islands. Scientific men of New Zealand 
have recently been making a thorough 1 ex- 
ploration of these islands and have come 
home with facts about them that are of great 
interest. 

The most r.emarkable thing they tell 
about the islands is that they were once part 
of the continent of Antarctica. There they 
stand far out at sea and isolated from all the 
rest of the world, and yet they are not 
oceanic islands. 

Most of the oceanic islands stand far from 
land and do not contain any of the typical 
rocks of the continents, such as sandstone 
and other sedimentary rocks, but were built 
up from the bottom of the ocean by the out- 
pourings of volcanoes or made by the reef 
building corals. Continental islands, on the 
other hand, usually stand near the conti- 
nents, and very often they were a part of 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 

the continents in an earlier time and thev 
have the same sedimentary and crystalline 

These little islands, though the) lie 
1,000 miles from Australia and a 
miles from South Victoria Land, a pari ol 
the Antartic continent, are built of the very 

same recks that make up the great i 
nental masses, and the most significant 
proof that they were once a part of a con- 
tinent is the fact that the mighty glaciers 
oi a past ice age left their unmistakable 
marks upon these rocks. Here are the 
gTOOVingS the\ dug in stone surfaces and 
the piles of niorainic debris they heaped up 
as they mo\ed along. 

The conclusion which Dr. Speight draws 
from these phenomena is that these islands 
arc vestiges of the much talked of Antarctic 
continent, and he and others believe that at 
a geological age not very far distant the 
Antarctic continent stretched from Aus- 
tralia to the South Pole and South America 
and later a large part of it sank beneath the 
sea. 

So the world seems to be coming back to 



the view of the mapmakers of the sixteenth 
ami seventeenth centuries, when they built 
their Terra Australis entirely out of 

jecture excepting for Ticrra del I 
which had been discovered, rhey placed so 
much of the mysterious continent where 
Australia really stands that there was much 
controversy later as to whether that region 
had not actually been found two or three 
centuries before Cook made his famous 
voyages. 

V V V 

T5hc Heart and the Soul 

By Ada Fostkr Murray 
The heart is a tender woman, 

Warm with the dew and wine 
Of a passion wholly human 

And a pity all divine. 

Sweet is her breath as the flowers 
In the sheltered nook and vale; 

Her hearth flame lights the hours 
When skies are wintry pale. 

But the soul is a spirit lonely 
That burns with a flame unfed 

On the still, white heights that are only 
Rose red when the sun is red. 

Some who hear her may never 

To her star-cold mountains go. 
But her far voice calls forever 

To those in the vales below. 




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PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



A Picturesque Fairfax 

Referring to the article "The Ro- 
mance of the Peerage," in a recent 
M. A. P., a correspondent writes: 
Perhaps one of the most picturesque 
and interesting figures in the Fairfax 
family, after its settlement in the 
United States, was Charles Snowdon 
Fairfax, the tenth baron, who for 
many years lived in California. This 
was from about 1852 to the breaking 
out of the war between the North and 
South, when he returned to Virginia 
and entered the Confederate Army. 
Curing his California residence he 
lived at Sacramento, the State capital, 
and filled the office of Clerk of the 
Supreme Court of California. This 
was a most lucrative office, the annual 
fees, which the incumbent retained, 
amounting to quite seventy-five thous- 
and dollars, or £15,000. 

He was a young man at the time, 
ranging from, say, twenty-three to 
thirty-two, and was tall, slight and 
"lean in. the flank" (as the author of 
"Guy Livingstone" always made his 
norman-blooded heroes); and had 
small clean-cut features, with the 
haughty expression and disdainful 
poise of the head that gave him the 
look of a true-born Cavalier. He was 
known as Charlie Fairfax, and was 
very popular, for he never "put on 
airs," as the American saying is. Al- 
though he never assumed the title, or 
even spoke of it to intimate friends, 
it was generally known that he was 
"an English Lord," and had a right 
to take the title if he liked. Yet he 
was as true and perfect a specimen of 
the Virginia gentleman as Thackeray 
ever portrayed. 

His native, inborn chivalry cannot 
be better shown than by an incident 
in which he acted a truly heroic part. 
Those were the days of Bret Harte's 
men and scenes, when pistols and 
knives were of common everyday use 
in the settlement of quarrels. It so 
happened that our Charlie Fairfax had 
had a little tiff with a young lawyer 
named Harvey Lee about some trifle, 
and meeting him in the street hot 
words ended in Lee drawing a sword- 
cane and stabbing Fairfax through 
the lungs. Grabbing the keen blade 
in his fingers and holding it so that 
Lee could not withdraw it from his 
breast, Fairfax quickly drew a revol- 
ver and held it at Lee's head. But 
he did not fire. This is what he said, 
while the crimson stream flowed from 
his lips with each word: 

"Harvey, I could slay you like a 
dog where you stand. You have 
wounded me fatally, as you see. But 
I think of your wife and children, and 
you shall go free." 

The pistol slipped from his weak- 
ening grasp, as he tottered back into 
the arms of friends. Clever surgical 
treatment and the nursing of his lov- 
ing wife saved his life, but Fairfax 
was never the same again. 

* * * 

He Saw Napoleon 

Eighty-seven years have passed 
since the death of Napoleon. Is there 
anybody now alive who remembers 
having seen him? Only one perhaps 



— a venerable negro of nine-five, an 
interview with whom is published in 
a recent issue of the "St. Helena 
Guardian." The negro, a native of the 
Congo, was kidnaped in childhood, 
taken to St. Paul de Loana, and placed 
on board a slave ship bound he knew 
not whither. When four or five days 
out at sea the slaver was captured 
by a British man-of-war and taken 
to St, Helena. 

A gentleman who lived near Long- 
wood, the residence of the exiled Em- 
peror, took the little black boy into 
his household. One day he was with 
a man who was rounding up some 
horses when the man suddenly ex- 
claimed "Look over there!" The boy- 
looked, and saw a short stout man in 
a long coat, with his hands behind his 
back, watching the movements of the 
horses. "That is the great Napoleon," 
said the man. to the boy; "he is a pris- 
oner here." 

General Sir William Butler has 
boldly declared his belief that in send- 
ing Napoleon to St. Helena the British 
government of the period deliberately 
desired to do him to death. That 
may or may not be so, but if the 
weather at Longwood was the same 
in Napoleon's time as it is today it 
must certainly have shortened the life 
of the illustrious exile. An item of 
news from Longwood, in the "St. 
Helena Guardian," says it has been 
raining there "incessantly for twenty- 
three days." There are, after all, 
worse places than London. "Long- 
wood" is now the site of a flax mill, 
but this latter day deluge has given 
the mill hands a long compulsory 
holiday. 

Bathing in Fire 

Fred E. Foskett, a young machinist 
of Orange, Mass., has the ability to 
bath in burning alcohol without being 
harmed. In a test made before Prof. 
William James he poured a quart of 
alcohol into the basin, lighted it and 
then washed his hands, bathing them 
for nearly ten minutes in the burning 
fluid, washing it up over his arms and 
to his face — literally bathing himself 
in blazing alcohol. When the test was 
completed the physicians present ex- 
amined Foskett, and they could find 
not the slightest trace of a burn or 
blister. Foskett told them that the 
flames did not give him the slightest 
sensation of burning, that he felt com- 
fortably warm and pleasant, and noth- 
ing more. Further tests were made of 
which as yet Prof. James refuses to 
say anything. 

* * * 

Harvard Interference 

It seems that soon after the recent 
Harvard victory over Yale on the 
gridiron President-elect William H. 
Taft, Yale '78, met a Harvard alumnus 
of prominence. "It seems to have 
been a Harvard year," said Mr. Taft, 
"you have beaten us at baseball, row- 
ing and football. In fct," he went on 
with a twinkle in his eye, "the only 
thing that Yale has taken has been 
the Presidency." "Yes," retorted the 
Harvard alumnus, "Yale has taken the 
Presidency — aided by igood Harvard 
interference." — Bookman. 



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PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



IR m. m\ m\ i eh 



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An Indian Pastime- 



How One "Woman Survived tHe Ordeal and 
Escaped a Husband 



RUNNING the gauntlet has bc- 
■ a mild ph iated 

with such jocular attacks as 
a man is subjected to when he in- 
trudes in a bargain rush or a meeting 
Time was when it 
igery. 
There are not a lew descendants in 
untry of those who suffered it, 
and many a thrilling story of the In- 
dian rite is still told around the even- 
ing tire in regions where people have 
time to dwell on pioneer days. Holi- 
days commemorating the early days 
of the republic are well calculated to 
stir up such family traditions, while a 
dark, gusty night in the Adirondacks 
or Maine woods gives the best pos- 
sible setting for a recital of hair-rais- 
ing horrors. But it is possible to go 
too far in the search for dramatic ac- 
cessories. The presence of a modern 
red man talking slang and smoking a 
cigarette would spoil the picture. 

The gauntlet was a peculiar institu- 
tion among the Indians, being a com- 
bination of held sport and spectacle 
and the satisfaction of a deep, semi- 
reUgiottS thirst for revenge. It was 
like football and "Parsifal" and an at- 
tack on the umpire joined in one grand 
performance. The social instincts of 
the Indians demanded that all mem- 
bers of the tribe should take part in 
the torture of a captive; it was educa- 
tional for the children, and it kept the 
squaws amused so that they did not 
ask for votes. An Indian on the war- 
path had his selfish tendency to ac- 
cumulate scalps at his belt modified by 
the tribal sentiment of taking home a 
few captives to give pleasure to others. 

There were feasting and dancing as 
a prelude to the game and every In- 
dian put on his best feathers and 
painted his face like the leading lady 
of a barnstorming troupe. Red blan- 
kets and purple wampum were the 
costume de rigueur. Two long lines 
were formed and the members of the 
tribe were armed with stones attached 
to thongs, pointed sticks, rawhide 
whips and other miscellaneous wea- 
pons. Knives and tomahawks were 
forbidden by the rules, not out of 
kindness, but lest the victim should 
drop before everybody had a share in 
the fun. It was also a foul to give a 
mortal wound unless the captive's face 
was painted black. Generally he was 
expected to survive the gauntlet and 
afford a final spectacle by being 
burned at the stake. The more hu- 
mane white Puritans, it has been 
pointed out, merely put their witches 
on the rack before burning them. The 
Indian love of bravery or physical 
fortitude occasionally saved the life 
of a captive who had withstood the 
ordeal of the gauntlet without com- 



plaint. He was then adopted by some 
member of the tribe, perhaps a widow 
or a mother bereft of her son. Feni- 
morc Cooper describes the narrow es- 
cape of his hero from marrying a 
squaw who elected him after the test 
of the gauntlet. Leatherstocking 
frankly declared that he would rather 
die than become patcr-familias in a 
wigwam. 

A story is told how a Pennsylvania 
woman in the year 1780 successfully 
ran the gauntlet with the aid of a fry- 
ing pan. Her name was Mrs. Elder 
and she lived in the Juniata Valley. 
She was good looking, black haired 
and thirty years of age when the Sen- 
ecas captured her in a raid and took 
her to their settlement on the Alle- 
gheny. They made her walk during 
the long journey and her homespun 
dress became torn, her feet were bare 
and her hair was filled with twigs and 
leaves. She carried the big iron fry- 
ing pan which she had been washing 
when the attack was made on her 
home. She had a presentment that the 
frying pan, emblem of civilization, 
would be of use to her and she 
clutched it firmly as she trudged 
through the woods. The other cap- 
tives were downhearted; she had faith 
in the frying pan in which had sizzled 
so many indigestible dainties for her 
loved ones. 

The fatal day and moment came 
when the Indians, yelling like demons, 
started the captives down the line of 
the gauntlet. Mrs. Elder calmly 
watched the progress of her compan- 
ions and waited her turn. She trusted 
to the speed natural to a frontiers- 
woman and the charmed domestic im- 
plement that she bore. The word was- 
given, and she ran. By using the pan 
as a shield she escaped so many blows 
and was getting on so well that an 
old Indian stepped out to block her 
progress. She raised the frying pan 
in the air and brought it down on his 
bare shoulder with such force that the 
sharp edge of the iron cut his flesh. 
The Indian fell back, taking the name 
of the Great Spirit in vain. 

A howl arose from the rest of the 
line. The beautiful captive made a hit 
with a chivalrous few, but the most 
were enraged by her daring. However, 
the success of her first attempt gave 
her renewed strength, and. using her 
weapon first on one side, and then on 
the other, she finally reached the end 
of her tormentors and safety. The 
medicine man who dressed the wound- 
ed braves said that there must be a 
heap of magic in the white squaw's 
pan. 

At the council fire that night the 
young brave who had taken Mrs. El- 
der prisoner asked permission to have 



her as his wile, lie was so impressed 
with her courage that he was willing 
to take chances with the frying pan 
and its owner. The council post- 
poned decision on this request until 
the Indians should be established in 
their winter quarters. The march to- 
ward this village was begun in a few 
days. On the march the young brave 
was very kind to the captive he de- 
sired, and she, with a slight degree of 
the coquettishness of her sex, kept 
him guessing. One day she would 
promise to ask the council that she be 
given to him, and then she would 
spend all her time doing little things 
for other admirers. The frying pan 
was her constant companion, and, dis- 
covering its proper use, the Indians 
appointed her chief of the culinary 
department. A thought came to Mrs. 
Elder of undermining the health of 
her captors by frequent treats of flap- 
jacks and doughnuts, but she hesi- 
tated, thinking it would be less cruel 
to use poison. She was saved from 
the necessity of deciding these doubts 
by the opportune arrival of an English 
rescuing party, and she lived many 
years to tell her grandchildren of her 
adventures in captivity. 

Among the captives of a large band 
of New York Indians in the early 
years of the Revolution was a boy 
named David Ogden. He was a sturdy 
lad of fourteen, and he was captured 
while cutting wood near a fort. In 
those days boys liked to cut wood, 
because there was a chance of things 
happening like this. David wore a 
buckskin jacket, homespun trousers 
and fringed leggings. His hat was of 
coonskin, made by tying the head and 
tail of the animal together. While 
marching through the wilderness of 
Central New York toward Fort Ni- 
agara the younger members of the In- 
dian party tried to scare David by tell- 
ing of the tortures that awaited him 
and the other captives. All would 
have to run the gauntlet outside of 
the fort before they could appeal to 
the English officers for protection. 
There were no particular hands across 
the sea at that time, nor was white 
blood much thicker than water, so that 
David felt justified in feeling a trifle 
blue. 

Early one morning after a night 
march the party came within sight of 
Fort Niagara. Hundreds of people 
were gathered before its weather- 
beaten gates. A great shout went up 
as the crowd discovered that the ap- 
proaching party had the makings of a 
first class torture festival. Prepara- 
tions were quickly made. Officers and 
men rushed out of the fort to enjoy 
the spectacle of seeing men of their 
race put through the ordeal. There 



was such enthusiasm that even the 
children picked up clubs and stones. 
The din was deafening, when the cap- 
tives drew closer together to deter- 
mine who was to run the gauntlet 
first. They were allowed to cast lots. 
The lot fell on the young boy. 

David must have figured it out be- 
fore, lie separated himself at once 
from the others, tightened his belt, 
threw off his coonskin cap, and be- 
fore the savages were aware of his in- 
tentions was dashing down the double 
ranked line. He was half way to the 
foot when they realized that the game 
had begun. Some of tlie English sent 
up a friendly cheer, while others 
sullenly foresaw the Yankee sharpness 
that would defeat them in the war. 
The Indians were wild. Those who 
had missed the first whack threw their 
clubs and weapons after the fleeing 
figure. A fat old squaw broke through 
the line and tried to stop him. David 
dodged and tripped her, and she fell 
to the ground, taking several other 
pursuers with her. A little further on 
a brave tried to grab hold of his coat, 
but as the garment was unfastened 
the runner escaped, and the warrior 
had only the coat for his pains. Four 
rods more and David fell panting in- 
side the walls of the fort, unharmed. 

After this the boy was adopted by 
an old squaw and taken to live in an 
Indian village. He received the name 
of Chee-chee-lee-cho, which probably 
meant Young-man-who-beats-it-quick, 
and he adopted the dress and manners 
of the redmen, with whom he lived in 
fair contentment for several years. 

Sometimes an Indian family wish- 
ing to adopt a white boy in place of a 
son killed in battle sent definite di- 
rections for the obtaining of a son to 
a party starting on a raid. A gift for 
the prospective heir might accompany 
the instructions. Such a case was the 
capture of Horatio Jones in 1781. A 
Seneca woman living on the Genesee 
River, New York, had lost a favorite 
son in battle and desired that a substi- 
tute should be gained for her. She 
made an elaborate wampum belt, 
which the chief heading a raid in 
Northern Pennsylvania was to put on 
the person of the selected captive. 
Horatio Jones, a young man of twen- 
ty, struck the chief as a good substi- 
tute and he received the belt. Neither 
he nor his companions knew the signal 
value of this token. On getting back 
to the Indian village the usual prepar- 
ations for the gauntlet game were 
made, and Horatio thought it v 
up when he was told to take his place 
with the rest. 

It was, in fact, necessary even fot 
an adopted son to show his mettle, but 
the chief devised a bit of crafty class 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



legislation which escaped the eagle 
eyes of the aged Indian jurists for the 
benefit of young Jones. The other 
captives were sent through the line in 
groups of two or three instead of 
singly, which caused confusion and 
kept the savages busily clubbing. In 
the midst of this Horatio got the 
word to start, and instead of stopping 
at the council house at the end of the 
line he was told to seek shelter in a 
hut further on. The young man 
reached the nearest group of runners 
and, diving in among them, used them 
as a protection until the end of the 
line was gained. He was hardly 
touched by the weapons of the sav- 
ages and he kept on his course. Sev- 
eral Indians who saw that he did not 
go to the "Long House" like the rest 
followed him. 

On he went at full speed until he 
came in sight of a rude hut. A woman 
and a young girl stood in the door- 
way. As he approached they motioned 
him to come in. They knew him by 
the warmpum belt which he wore. The 
woman's eyes sparkled as she thought 
that war was returning to her the 
son that war had taken. The young 
girl was delighted with the looks of 
her adopted brother. But the code 
of the tribe had to be followed, and 
the young man had to be hidden un- 
der the bed as if nothing less could 
save him. He heard the women, who 
had returned to the door, talking to 
his pursuers. The men seemed satis- 
fied with the explanation given by the 
women and went away. Horatio was 
brought out from his hiding place, giv- 
en food and treated very kindly. 

The excitement was not over yet. 
The young man was returned to the 
Long House for the night and left 
there with the other prisoners. The 
Indians filled up on firewater, which 
had not been guaranteed by the pure 
food laws. They yelled and talked 
about killing the captives. At length 
the door of the council house was 
knocked in and one of the prisoners 



taken by the maddened crowd. The 
noise increased as the savages dashed 
out the man's brains, put his head on 
a pole and danced around it. 

Again the door of the prison opened, 
this time softly. Horatio felt his hand 
taken by that of another person and 
a finger was put warningly to his lips. 
He was led from the building to the 
house where he had spent the after- 
noon. His rescuers left* him there, 
and one by one led the other prisoners 
to the edge of the forest. The last 
captive had just reached the forest 
when the braves, thirsting for more 
blood, again broke into the council 
house. Finding all the prisoners gone, 
they began fighting among themselves, 
but they were too drunk for pursuit, 
and they fell into an alcoholic stupor, 
which lasted till the morning. 

However, the prisoners were all re- 
captured the next day, and their fate 
was debated at the council fire by the 
braves who were not too much 
troubled by the popularly known "left 
over". Not until then did Horatio 
know that he had been selected for 
adoption. A brave arose, and by a 
long argument showed how the Great 
Spirit had watched over the boy, had 
taken him safely through the gauntlet, 
removed him to safety when he might 
have been killed, and had endowed 
him with all the attributes that the 
tribe wished in the sons they adopted. 
It was voted that he should be given 
to the person who wanted him. He 
was decidedly glad when the squaw 
who had sheltered him came forward 
to claim him. as her son. 

Horatio went to the hut which was 
to be his home and donned the clothes 
of an Indian warrior. The other mem- 
bers of the family greeted him, and 
then the whole tribe offered him best 
wishes and vows of friendship. He 
lived among the redmen many years, 
acted as interpreter between them and 
the whites, and at length became their 
chief. Ultimately he returned to civili- 
zation. 




How Chicag'oans Treat the Eng'lisH Language 



SOM'E of the school teachers 
of Chicago are reported to 
have made a "discovery" of 
what many visitors to the Windy City 
had suspected many times before — 
which is, the teachers declare, that 
Chicagoans seem to be too busy to 
use good English. Correctness, ele- 
gance and precision they hold to be 
requisites in a scientific treatise, but 
too many of them think these quali- 
ties hardly worth striving for in every- 
day conversation. They attempt to 
excuse this by saying that when they 
feel the want of words to convey an 
exact shade of meaning, they haven't 
time to "go huntin' for 'em" in the dic- 
tionary. What does it matter, any- 
way, they ask, whether we express 
an idea just right, so long as we are 
understood? 

At the horse show, say the school 
teachers; Chicagoans congratulate one 



another on their ownership of "such 
lovely exhibits." At the flower show 
they pass in. procession before the 
prize rose and repeatedly exclaim: 
"Ain't it lovely!" At their chicken 
show it is: "Really, isn't it a lovely 
rooster!" While at the automobile 
exposition they gather in knots and 
argue like this: "Really now, that's a 
lovely machine." The common ex- 
pression of delight produced by the 
sight of a curly haired pet, be it dog, 
cat or child, is: "Ain't he sweet?" 

In referring to lawless men who 
live through outright stealing of the 
goods or money of others that ac- 
quire property legally, if not alto- 
gether honestly, the Chicagoan scarce- 
ly ever employs the plebeian term 
"thief." Young and old, cultured and 
uncultured, men and women, speak 
of a common pickpocket or footpad 
as a "bandit." A Chicago man will 



relate an adventure in language like 
this: "I was on a streetcar and seen 
a bandit sneakin' up. I was on to 
him in a minute, but didn't let on. 
Pretty soon he made a pass to nip 
my sparker. I swung and attempted 
to knock his block off, but the women 



yelled and he ducked out and got away 
in the panic." 

The wind that Chicagoans endure is 
"fierce;" so are some of the costumes 
seen in the State street parade, and 
so is a business office strewn with 
papers; if a judge has to climb five 




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PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



• i bc- 

lan- 
teacher i» 

linner. In their com 

lishment' the) were in : she r< tei i 
i 

imented Mr. Arnold on his 
the club- 
n, and then she called his 
11 to the 'elegant pickle' that 
to lier. And thus 
it all around. The 
think i in 'Ivanhoe' a- 

Rowena as 'awfully 
.' and of Front de Boeuf 

A^k the average Chicagoan if an 

funny; the answer i>. 
Show him a hippopotamus, 
irang-outang or a Gila monster 
at the circus, and the odds are 100 
i" 1 that he will ejacnlatc, "Funny 
tiling, ain't it!" And the next minute 
he may he just as likely to remark: 
"It's funny the way the people rush 
to hear Bryan and then won't vote 
for him." 
In pronunciation, as well as in the 
he Chicagoans are 
in a class by themselves. The other 
day a clubwoman was heard lamenting 
"the sad fate of the poisoned 'Dongh- 
;er' Empress of China." A man 
was heard explaining in a business 
that hr wished to raise money 
before the expiration of an "opsition" 
he had on a lot. But it is in the use 
lang that the English of Chica- 
IS becomes really picturesque. In 
many parts of this country people 
unable to guess what President 
R.0 isevelt meant when he emphasized 
an idea with the ancient word "fraz- 
zle," but Chicagoans would have un- 
derstood him thoroughly if the Presi- 
dent had announced: "We had 'cm 
licked to a finish from the getaway. 
It was a pipe, a cinch. I had it all 
doped out a month ago and slipped a 
tip to William to cut out botherin' 
ah. no it and to skidoo to the wierner- 
wursts. The people came across with 
the goods, and William loped home. 
They sloughed us on a couple of dinky 
State jobs, but we copped the big 
stakes, and 'twas easy money." 

All these and many other points 
wen brought out through a discus- 
sion in a recent meeting of the Chica- 
go English Club. This i, a new or- 
ganization, composed of several hun- 
dred members, principally teachers in 
normal, high and grammar schools, 
although numerous college professors 
belong to it. The president is James 
F. Ilosic. of the chair of English in 
the Chicago Normal School. Its In- 
ception is traceable to a general com- 
plaint among educators of the "mis- 
use and abuse" of words in the Wes- 



tern city Miss 

in the lib' 

iper which 
rusnl 

e English Club was prepared by 
Miss Lucie Hammond, teacher ol 
glislt ill the Wendell Phillips High 

nl: 

reform must be. in at .. 

have t.i go outside a in. 
of teachers to hear had grammar, 
don't ;' had English i - 
HI familiar acquaint n 
nice;' lack of precision, 

slovenly enunciation? A 
science once said to me. '1 ain't par- 
ticular how the children say a tl 
what I'm after is the facts.' Another, 
a teacher of histt n y, i ibjected serious- 
ly to a suggestion lor co operation 
[i partments of history 

and English, because, -he -aid. 'lil- 

iught not to be subordinated to 

ish.' Then there is the teacher 
who 1- content to accept an answer 
he child has approximately 
t!:u idea, but cannot express himself 
fin- 1 1. idler will rarely lake 
the time or energy to help the child 
express himself clearly." 

The fact is that the pupils who 
study grammar and , rhetoric for a 
few hours a week neglect to use the 
rules they hearn when; they ien,ter 
the other classes, where they spend 
many hours a week, and the teachers 
of those other subjects demand noth- 
ing in the way of good English from 
their pupils, either in written or oral 
work. 

An attempt to eradicate this evil 
has been made in the Wendell Phillips 
High School, where the teachers of 
all departments have formed an or- 
ganization for co-operation in teach- 
ing English with all other subjects, 
the pupils being given to understand 
that the language they use will count 
in their averages. 

Miss Bennett prophesied that the 
great-grandchildren of present day 
Chicagoans might use correct English 
if the reform work thus begun was 
unflagging. The outlook did not ap- 
pear so hopeful to an adult student in 
one of the Chicago night schools, 
whose composition is given by Charles 
P. Megan, Assistant Superintendent 
of Chicago's schools, as follows: 

"In age of 16 to IS years I found 
interest in reading stories about Amer- 
ica. I held all Americans for ideal- 
ists. I saw in them a higher grade 
of culture. It is ten months since I 
am in this country. I don't know- 
why I losed my tendency to. this coun- 
try. I seek idealism and cannot find 
it. It may be that it is against your 
meaning, but when we see our young 
men which are spending all their enci- 
m lor baseball and at lime of dinner 
arc eaten with the ball in their hands, 
or that in a cold 'baseball day' thous- 
ands of people run to see ami find a 
great deal of interesting in sox and 
cubs, so we can understand (hat the 
American idealism is — baseball; their 
culture — fight, and their progress — 
the dollar." 



The Misses Page 
Boarding and Day School 

Primary — Preparatory — High School 
Single Management but Separate in Location 



FOR BOYS 

137 West Adams Street 

Telephone Home 21203 

ilendid home for boys and 
also a well regulated school- 
home where the character i 
ing of the boy is given the im- 
portance it deserves. The pro- 
verb "Train up the child in the 
way he should go; and when 
he is old he will not depart from 

it." is exemplified at this scl 1. 

Boys here are taught manliness, 
obedience, punctuality, industry 
and learning in a way fitting 
them suitably as foundation 
stones for life's progress- Boys 
of any age after 5 years ad- 
mitted. Each boy is held to be 
an individual. Not being held 
back by class restrictions bis 
progress is rapid and certain. 
Boys in addition to the regular 
school studies of our girls 
school are taught sloyd, mili- 
tary drill, vocal and instrumen- 
tal music, also the languages. 
The military department is in 
charge of Captain Robert A. 
. Gibbs. 

The school has athletic field 
where boys are taught sports 
and military drill. 

William Himrod, graduate of 
Pomona College and Champion 
mile runner of Pacific coast, is 
in charge of boys' play and 
athletics. 



FOR GIRLS 

243 West Adams Street 

Horn* Phone 21202 
Sunset South 3S39 

Located like boys' school in one 
of most aristocratic residence 
sections of Los Angeles. The 
buildings are well adapted to a 
girls' school; wide verandas, 
upper balconies and beautiful 
grounds, set out to semi-tropical 
shrubbery. Miss Emma E. Page 
and Miss Delia M. Page, prin- 
cipals of these schools, are from 
Hiram College, Ohio, and both 
are Normal graduates. Miss 
Clara J. Armstrong, principal of 
the high school department, is 
a graduate of Oswego Slate 
Normal School, New York, a 
teacher whose exceptional abil- 
ity and experience along general 
educational lines is well known 
and established. 

Girls here are taught vocal 
and instrumental music, drawing 
and painting, physical culture, 
elocution; these in addition to 
regular school studies. 

Ample facilities are afforded 
for recreation and the girls' 
home training and moral wel- 
fare is attended to in a manner 
to bring out the sweet and beau- 
tiful in character, so essential to 
true womanhood. 



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MAIN 213 



10 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



A Poverty Cure 

An American business man has 
pointed out to Englishmen one solu- 
tion of the problem of dealing with 
the unemployed in Great Britain. 
This is Joseph Fels of Philadelphia, 
whom business has compelled to 
spend part of the last seven years in 
England. He is a disciple of Henry 
George. 

When in England he was struck 
with the poverty and wretchedness of 
a large part of the population, and he 
has sought to relieve it by leading 
the people back to the land. His .ef- 
forts have been successful to the ex- 
tent that he has induced the conserva- 
tive English public authorities tenta- 
tively to adopt some of his plans. 

One of his most notable achieve- 
ments is the establishment of the 
Hollesley Bay Labor Colony on the 
Suffolk coast within easy train jour- 
ney of London, says a London corre- 
spondent of the New York Sun. This 
colony is now in the hands of the 
Central Unemployed Body for Lon- 
don, a committee working under the 
Local Government Board, and it is 
being used to convert London's fail- 
ures into useful citizens. About 300 
men are constantly in residence there, 
being evolved largely from the waste 
products of the London slums into 
gardeners, farm laborers and colon- 
ists. 

The total area of land is about 1,300 
acres, and there is a range of fine 
buildings, formerly used as an agri- 
cultural college. Much of the land 
was rough heath, but it is steadily be- 
ing broken up and brought under cul- 
tivation. 

Mr. Fels bought the estate in 1904 
and offered it rent free to the Central 
Unemployed Body for three years, 
with the option of purchase at the 
end of that time at the price he paid 
for it. The estate cost him in all 
about $200,000, and it was taken over 
by the Unemployed Body before the 
time had elapsed. 

Only men with families are sent to 
Hollesley Bay. They are main- 
tained while in residence there, and 
their families in London receive a 
regular weekly allowance. They are 
sent at first for eight weeks, and if 
they show aptitude for agricultural 
work they are kept for a further term. 
Many of the men have obtained situa- 
tions as farm laborers and gardeners, 
other have been assisted to emigrate 
and are doing well, and a few have 
managed to secure small agricultural 
holdings on their own account at 
home. 

The idea of building up a race of 
small independent agriculturists is 
really the idea underlying the scheme, 
but the difficulty of obtaining small 
holdings is very great and the new 
small holdings act which is now in 
operation in England is doing very 
little to improve the situation in this 
respect. 

Before the Hollesley Bay experi- 
ment Mr. Fels had made another on 
a smaller scale which has proved 
equally successful. He bought a farm 



at Laindon, Essex, for $10,000 and of- 
fered it to the Poplar Board of 
Guardians on terms similar to those 
offered to the Central Unemployed 
Body. Poplar is one of the poorest 
districts in London and the offer was 
accepted promptly. Much the same 
work is being carried on at Laindon 
as at Hollesley Bay, but on another 
scale. 

Another of Mr. Fels's experiments 
and the one in which he is perhaps 
most interested is his small holders' 
village at Mayland, Essex, where he 
bought a farm of 630 acres and cut 
part of it up into little holdings on 
each of which he built a pretty and 
comfortable cottage and out-build- 
ings. There are now twenty-two five 
acre holdings on the farm, and others 
will be carved out as fast as the pres- 
ent tenants prove successful. 

The tenants pay rent and are able 
to make a fair living. Most of them 
are men of family who are helped in 
the cultivation by their wives and 
children. 

Perhaps the most interesting of Mr. 
Fels's experiments is that to which 
he is devoting himself this year. This 
is the cultivation of the vacant land 
in London itself, and although the ex- 
periment is only a year old, it Is 
achieving wonders in a small way. 
There are at least 250 such plots al- 
ready under cultivation, and surpris- 
ing crops have been reaped from the 
little gardens which a year ago were 
a waste of bricks and mortar. 

It is estimated that there is in Lon- 
don at least 10,000 acres of unused 
land capable of helping to support at 
least 80,000 men and their families. 
Most of the land is of the familiar 
vacant lot type. It is either land 
which has been built on and on which 
the buildings have been demolished or 
it is land that has been overtaken and 
surrounded by the city and is waiting 
for the builders. 

The owners were in some cases dis- 
posed to look on the proposal that 
they should lend it to the poor with 
suspicion, but that attitude has now 
been largely overcome. The work is 
handled by the Vacant Land 'Cultiva- 
tion Society organized by Mr. Fels. 

This society borrows the land from 
the owners and lends it to suitable 
applicants. If the applicants possess 
no knowledge of gardening they are 
instructed by the society's superinten- 
dent, R. L. Castle, who was former-, 
ly- gardener to the Duke of Bedford. 
The men prove apt pupils and very 
few have failed to succeed. 

One of the plots taken over in this 
way is typical of the rest. It lies in 
Fulham, near Putney Bridge, and a 
year ago it was covered with broken 
bricks, mortar and other debris. It 
had been in this condition for more 
than twenty years. Today the only 
reminder of the waste it was a year 
ago is a neat pile of bricks and rub- 
bish. Some men have been getting 
produce at the rate of $250 an acre 
off these vacant lots. 

Mr. Fels's idea, has been taken up 
by a number of corporations which 
own large tracts of vacant land. The 



Gas Light and Coke Company, which 
supplies the greater part of London's 
gas, has turned over to the society 
twenty-five acres of land in Canning 
Town, in the east of London, which 
has been transformed from a waste 
to a stretch of smiling gardens. A 
number of railway companies have 
adopted the plan of allowing their 
employees to cultivate the waste land 
at the sides of their tracks, and it is 
now a familiar thing on the railways 
running out of London to see row af- 
ter row of cabbages, beans, peas and 
other vegetables growing on the nar- 
row strips alongside the line. 

* •§• * 
How Heedless 

Young Mother — I'm sorry, Mr. Top- 
floor, if baby's crying annoyed you. 
He's been cutting his teeth. 

Topfloor (a crusty bachelor) — 
That's it! The idea of letting a young 
child have a knife to play with! — 
Boston Transcript. 

* + * 
Safer 

Wiggs — rt is better to begin at the 
bottom of the ladder. 

Wagg — Yes, then you won't have so 
far to fall. — Philadelphia Record. 




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11 



AMUSEMENTS 



"Nancy 4 Co." 
even in the palm; days oi the 

Rehan, John 
Dre« -i rt and James Lewis 

in tl ■ 

adapt — have re- 

el a heartier welcome than it ha- 
at the Bnrbank this week. 
The eccentric and perennially lively 
rce has bi hi down to 

date by the introducti pres- 

ent day slang, and the smart il 
and coiffures oi the women in the 
It should be altered further to suit 
modern ideas, by leaving out the 
nuroei and 



which Ilobart Bosworth | I 

with the Daly com- 
i> into the part with deadly 
. which keeps the audience 
in | continual roar. Mary Hall in Ada 
Rohan's role of Nancy, though inap- 
propriately gowned in the lir.-t two 

d herself possessed of the 

true comic spirit. Miss Margo Duffct 
made a vivacious and charmingly at- 
tired ingenue. 

Next week "Sporting Life" will be 
given at the Burbank. It is a thrill- 
ing melodrama containing a race and 
a prize fight. 

A Mine of Fun 
The Heir to the Hoorah, for whom 
the play at the Belasco this week is 



■lis to each other. Mr. 
with lirm- 
char- 
acter of the minor with admirable 
skill between the lir^t and last acts. 
Mr. Jennings is no less good in his 
way :i- Dave. His make up is 

cealing without being overdone and 
one hardly recognizes him when he 
first appears without looking at the 
program. The men in the cast have 
more to do than often falls to their 
lot. Miss Noycs was very fetchingly 
gowned in the first act and Miss 
Preston did better in the first acts of 
the play than is her wont. The sec- 
ondary love scenes were, however, 
rather tiresome. Why do we rejoice 
-'i at the disci mforture of mi >ther-in 



terraii which is ■ 

Furthermore, it is pli 

ompany again at 
ease and at hi 




cutting down the dialogue, for the 
piece is really too long. Even laugh- 
ter palls before the end of four acts. 
packed full of extravagant humor and 
impossible situations. As is usually 
the case in farce, the men in the cast 
have the effective parts. Burton's 
Ebenezer Grifling is a characteriza- 
tion full of quaint drollery. Stock- 
bridge's make up for the booby Stock- 
slow, is as clever as his acting. Mes- 
tayer as the jealous husband — a role 



Florence Oakley, Belasco Theatre 

named, is a speechless hero of doubt 
ful anatomy. His backbone might be 
a cudgel for aught we know to the 
contrary. His existence helps the 
happy termination of a serious drama 
and his needs are the excuse for a 
good deal of farce. He is a junior 
edition of Joe Lacy, the owner of 
a mine, and a stage baby. Two of the 
principle characters of the play are 
Joe Lacy (Mr. Stone) and Dave Lacy 
(Mr. Jennings) his brother. They are 



laws? Probably because the conven- 
tions and power of the passing gen- 
eration do not suit the ferment of to- 
morrow. Miss Lewis as Mrs. Kent 
show's us a woman who wields her 
sceptre to the end, forgetting the 
graces of abdication and the binding 
force of abnegation. Miss Oakley 
lias little to do. Her red gown 
jarred a good deal with the blue of 
the setting in the last act. The color- 
ing was virulent. Frolic and pain in- 



At the Majestic Theater 
Sis Hopkins continued to bring 

this week. Rose Melville has won 
ior herself a unique place in the popu- 
lar fancy anil one which she seems 
likely to hold indefinitely. 

Next week Murry and Mack will be 
seer at this house in "The Sunny Side 
of Broadway". 

DON. 



Belasco Theater 

Lewis S. Stone and the Belasco 
theater company will offer Harry Mil- 
ler's well known romantic comedy suc- 
cess "Heartsease," this week, with the 
customary Belasco matinees Thurs- 
day, Saturday and Sunday. 

Heartsease was last played in Los 
Angeles wlien White Whittlesey used 
it as his chief vehicle when he starred 
throughout the West, five years ago. 
It is a deligtfully entertaining comedy 
with several remarkably powerful 
dramatic scenes in which Mr. Stone 
and the supporting players will find 
every desirable opportunity to indulge 
in effective dramatic work. Hearts- 
ease is a costume play and the stage 
pictures should be especially beautiful. 
Scenic Artist Brunton has spent the 
past fortnight upon the production 
and promises a series of uncommonly 
handsome canvases. 
Following "Heartsease" Mr. Stone and 
the Belasco company will play the 
ever joyous farce "Charley's Aunt," 
with a big revival of "The Girl of the 
Golden West" scheduled to follow, in 
which Florence Oakley will have an 
opportunity to exploit her talents as 
an emotional actress in the role of 
The Girl. 



Gadski 

Mine. Johanna Gadski's fame abroad 
has been greatly strengthened by her 
singing at the famous Mozart Festival 
in Cologne. Her Countess in the 
"Marriage of Figaro" two seasons ago 
won special praise. 

"The outburst of applause that fol- 
lowed Gadski's efforts was deserved", 
said the Cologne Gazette. "Her voice 
possesses a kind of coloring that per- 
mits the most versatile range, from 
passionate intensity to absolute mas- 
tery of the bel canto. Her tone emis- 
sion and shading are at all times mas- 
terful, and her singing is an un- 
troubled delight". 

To Mme. Johanna Gadski, the great 
Wagnerian singer from Germany, has 
been intrusted the opening of the mu- 
sical season of 1909 in Los Angeles, 
where she sings in concert at Simp- 
son Auditorium. Jan. 12. 

Gadski has endeared herself to the 
music lovers of America through 
many appearances, but doubtless her 
greatest appeal is through her pro- 
gram selections. They are always 
those of the deep student, the highly 
intelligent and cultured woman, and 
the gifted musician. Her exquisite 
poetry, her inspiring dramatic force 
and wonderful depth of feeling place 



12 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



her among the greatest singers of the 
day, and it is gratifying to realize that 
'the musical world will yet have many 
more years in which to enjoy this 
superb artist. 

Gadski, who is only thirty-four 
years of age, has the maturity in art 
of a woman at least ten years her 
senior. And what more stupendous 
proof of conscientious and unremitting 
study could be asked for? 



A Lion for the Mason 

Charles Klein's drama, "The Lion 
and the Mouse" is scheduled for next 
week at the Mason Opera House. 
Henry B. Harris is sending a com- 
pany of players who have been asso- 
ciated in this play for three 
years. Paul Everton and Edna Archer 
Crawford will present the leading 
roles. The supporting company con- 
tains Frederick Malcolm, Win. Bur- 
ton, James Cooley, Eileen Errol, Clif- 



quainted with immediate conditions 
in her father's case. Shirley has no 
easy task in bringing the enemy to 
an unconditional surrender, but 
through the laws of psychology she 
succeeds. The consequent scenes of 
strength are numerous and the two 
great wits .encounter some furious 
battles before the quiet of reigning 
peace, that follows war, is restored. 

Grand Opera Recitals 

A fitting finale to a grand opera sea- 
son will be a series of opera recitals 
to be given at Symphony Hall in the 
Blanchard Building, commencing Jan. 
10, by Bruce Gordon Kingsley. 
These six events are founded on 
Wagner's immortal works, Tann- 
hauser, The Mesitersinger, Tristan 
and Isolde, The Ring and Goethe's 
Faust. The idea is to give to the pub- 
lic who are admirers of music and the 
opera stage, an adequate idea of these 



LITERARY NOTES 



I GROW HAIR. 



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HirallfBMI»WMiBHlffl 

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KmsBKfmF 




A Scene in Act II op "The Lion and the Mouse" at the 
Mason next week 



ford Leigh, George O. Morris, Har- 
ris L. Forbes and Eleanore Sheldon, 
An epitome of the plot may not be 
inapropos. John Burkett Ryder, con- 
ceded to be the richest man in the 
world, has been the instigator of the 
unwarranted downfall of Judge Ross- 
more. The judge's clever daughter 
has fallen in love with the only son 
of the money tyrant, but forsakes the 
hopes of her own happiness to restore 
her sire to a peaceful frame of mind. 
She writes a. book, "The Octopus", in 
which she attacks the money baron in 
a merciless fashion. Ryder reads the 
book and his vanity is touched to the 
degree that he seeks the young wom- 
an's services in the writing of his 
autobiography. A strong point is 
thereby gained by the girl as she is 
given access to the Ryder mansion, a 
fact which enables her to become ac- 



great masterpieces, presenting each 
evening a program of music contain- 
ing ten or twelve of the authors great- 
er selections, illustrated on the piano, 
giving the motifs, with a lecture to 
cover the more salient points, both 
vocal and dramatic. 

The arias will be interpreted by 
competent vocalists and magnificent 
colored views have been arranged for 
Faust, The Ring, and Parsifal. It is a 
unique, but an intelligent combina- 
tion and to those who are interested, 
student, teacher or lover of music, in 
Wagner's masterpieces, the combina- 
tion will prove most interesting. 
Popular prices will be charged and a 
season ticket to cover the six lectures 
will place them within reach of all. 
L. E. Behymer is manager of the 
series. The seat sale will be at the 
Bartlett Music Company. 



By Perez Fieed 

The taciturn Hawthorne as he ap- 
peared at a dinner at Emerson's house 
is thus described, in Mr. Lehmann's 
"Memories": "As usual, he hardly ever 
spoke, and, I only remember his break- 
ing his apparent vow of silence when 
appealed to by a Mr. Bradford. This 
gentleman, after a fiery denunciation 
of the South, having come to the end 
of his peroration, passionately turned 
to his silent listener with the words, 
'Don't you agree with me?' Then 
Hawthorne astonished him by utter- 
ing the monosyllable 'No,' after which 
he again relapsed into silence." 



In Putnam's for January Frances 
Albert Doughty writes of California 
Paradoxes. The writer says: "In a 
large part of California there are no 
distinct seasons. This creates a con- 
fusion in the mind of the newcomer, 
who is served with canned peas in 
July and fresh ones in November, and 
with raspberries and strawberries at 
Christmas." Of society she says: 

"As the millionaire set monopolizes 
the 'swim,' young girls with parents 
of limited means are apt to have a dull 
time unless they have the good luck 
to live in one of the larger cities. 
Many of them are over-educated for 
their social opportunities. The stand- 
ard of schools and colleges is high, 
but the aim after graduation seems 
to be to conceal culture, to adapt 
one's self to the 'Conglomeration as 
soon as possible. After spending hun- 
dreds of dollars on music, a girl will 
pack away her symphonies and son- 
atas to play "Ragtime"," and sing the 
love story of the "sweet little Chim- 
panzee" and "the King of the Cocoa- 
nut Grove." After galloping through 
French and German at the public 
school, perhaps Latin and Greek at 
Eerkeley or Stanford, she discovers 
that Pidgin English and Mexican 
Spanish would be far more useful in 
her post-marital dealings with petty 
tradesmen, laundrymen, drivers of 
vegetable carts and applicants at the 
back gate in general. But this is the 
experience of educated folk in all com- 
munities where society is not largely 
ieavened by habits and traditions of 
culture. Only New England women 
have the everlasting grit and the tra- 
ditional esteem for learning to keep 
up mental improvement along with 
household drudgery; and their bad cli- 
mate helps them to do it, by remov- 
ing the temptation to spend much 
time out of doors. Yet a great deal 
of reading must be done in California, 
notwithstanding the temptations to 
idleness, judging from the library re- 
ports. 

"The listner feels like running away 
from the mocking-bird's song, to make 
somebody happy, for the last strong- 
hold of the fugitive happiness is in 
the impersonal; but this chance too 
often eludes the California exile, for 
there are few abjectly poor people to 
help: the army of tourists rushes by 
at a frantic speed and the residents 
suffice unto themselves. A wistful ex- 
pression settles upon some faces. 




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PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



13 



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de I'Amerique 

iralc" is the title ol a b »'k !>y M. 
Maurice de Waleffe who made a fly- 
trip to Cuba and the peninsula 
republics. The author conclud' 
answer to the question "Will the 
Unite devour the whi 

tmerica?" thai nothing can 

it tile "Yankee floodtide" as 

as it has swept over the "Mexi- 

likes" from ''drowning Venezue- 

ilombia, Equador and Peru," and 

it will not stop in its victorious course 

until it encounters the barriers of the 

three solid state- of South America, 

Brazil. Argentina and Chili. M, de 

Waleffe, moreover, predicts that in 

twenty years the United States will tic 

more powerful than all the nations of 

Europe combined, and that "Rome 

will be in the new world and Paris 

will become an Athens, fading away 

in the melancholy shades of the past!" 



In an article on "Everlasting .Monu- 
ments to Scientists" Leopold Ehrlich 
-ays in a Berlin paper: "The stones 
finally crumble and the bronzes may- 
be destroyed. Younger generations 
have their heroes and forget the 
names of those who have gone before. 
■ But making the name of a scientist a 
part of the universal scientific lan- 
re i- .in indestructible monument. 
The men who gave the name of ohm 
in honor of George Simon Ohm to the 
unit of electric resistance: ampere, the 
unit of electric current, to perpetuate 
the name of Andre Mare Ampere, and 
volt, in honor of Alessandro Volta, 
to the unit of electro-motive force. 
banded these names to the people of 
all times to follow. The cablegram 
should have been named for Field as 
the wireless message has been for 
Marconi, and the incandescent lamp 
would burn just as well if it were 
known as an 'edison'. The suggestion 
thai the kilowatt hour should be called 
i 'kelvin,' for the scientist who pre- 
ferred to be called Thompson, should 
In- carried out, and thus another 
worthy name would be made im- 
perishable " 

Granville Ban'tock composed a can- 
tata called "Omar Khayyam". When 
it was produced at Birmingham a lad} 
who-,; h's were inarticulate wrote to 
say that -he would unfortunately he 
!' 'Hi. She "would so much have 
liked to. hear the dear old. Illiad set to 



I remem- 

1 him 

ill Greek" He: h the 

ike. 

Andrew Lang think- thai it i 
ter I" be a novelist than a hist 
The latter, he says, "may make in 

nd consider 
Mr Lang add-: 

1 -peak indeed, -..rely 

having written an historii 
about the length of a common novel. 
There are some fifteen hundred refer- 
ences to "authorities" a- my printer 
ingeniously misprinted the word. 
hirst, I put them into tin- manuscript 
as they occurred, and then twice com- 
pared every mortal one of them with 
the volumes and pag< - to which they 
referred. Then they were all typed 
separately, and were again verified 
for the third time. Then they were 
printed and verified for the fourth 
time, in print, which yields six thou- 
sand cases m|' looking up a passage 
After all, it is certain that some 
numerals will be wrong, and then the 
critic will come and raise an outcry. 

Indeed, all this eye-destroying la- 
bor is not undertaken for the general 
reader, but solely in the hope of de- 
priving other historians of their one 
melancholy delight — finding out the 
mistakes of a brother in the craft. 

Mr. Gribble, in his "Rousseau and 
the Women He Loved," has caused 
me great satisfaction by making a 
"howler" of the purest water. I hug 
the fact: it consoles me when melan- 
choly invades; but I deprive no his- 
torian of the pleasure of finding it our 
for himself. This is what makes 
"The Dictionary of National Biog- 
raphy" so pleasant — discovering the 
"howlers." Not that I blame the edi- 
tors, for not even they were omnis- 
cient. 

Once I found out a writer who may 
be truly said to be nothing if not ac- 
curate, in a "howler." He had a pace, 
headed "Erriata" (which is plural), 
and on the page was only one 
"erratum"! If there had been more, 
I hopefully believe that he would have. 
written "Erratae." 

In a recent number of the Corn- 
hill Magazine H. W. Lucy tells how 
he received some ghostly advice which 
proved profitable. 

"Thirty years ago," be says. "I 
sought and found opportunity of test- 
ing the genuineness of table turning, a 
practice at the time much in vogue. 
With three other persons, equally hon- 
estly in search of the truth, we sat 
down and joined out-stretched bands 
on a small table. 

"Presently it began to move, and 
there followed the customary cate- 
chism as to the identity of the spirit 
who honored us with his (or her) 
company. This was tried in succes- 
sion by my three companions, who 
reciting the alphabet in accordance 
with the formula, asked the visitor to 
"rap once" when a desired letter was 
reached. 

"The table gyrated with great vigor, 
but. the. alphabet was, in each case, 



. let- 
ter hel| word. M j 
coming round, I renewed the effort. 
ne to the letter ( the rim 
of the tabli 

with evidently i nt. Simi- 

lar token wa- forthcoming when I 
Liter H. and so on until 
Charles D led out. 

"Then followed a quite fri 
vcrsation, in tin com i « hich I in 

I '.I.I. llilll 

me call on his -on Charles, at the 
time , ditor oi i [ousi hold \\ ords,' 
whom, he assured me. I should find in 
ii ndly mood. ... 1 was SO 
much struck with the incident thai on 
the next day I found my way down to 

the office ol ' I [ousehold Word-' ami 

sent in my card to the editor. My 
name being absolutely unknown to 
him. a- ii wa- to all outside a narow 
circle. I expected my temerity would 
be properly rewarded by a message- 
that the great man was engaged. On 
the contrary, I was promptly ushered 
into the presence of Charles Dickens, 
Jr., who received me in the friendliest 
fashion, and straightway commis- 
sioned me to write an article for 
I lousehold Words.' 

"It was accepted, and I received 
wdiat at the time I regarded as a 
prodigiously handsome check — the 
first earned in that field of labor." 



Premising that some of the greatest 
scholars have used their learning 
more as a weapon than a means of 
illumination, "The London Spectator" 
tells this winning story of Professor 
Lewis Campbell's gentleness and 
courtesy: "Some years ago he was in 
the chair at a meeting of the Hellenic 
Society, when Dr. Arthur Evans de- 
scribed the results of some of his first 
excavations in Crete. Among his 
finds were a number of seals and 
other relics showing traces of affinity 
with early Egyptian art. Discussion 
followed, iii the course of which a 
venerable admiral, who had been 
present at the battle of Neivarino, rose 
and said that he did not know 
whether he was in order, but he 



ite that in the 
was cruisin 
Levant, he 

■ 

never seen hefo, , 

delicate, but ii was 
by ih,- chairman, win, ro>c imn 
ately to express the thanks of tile 

esting renin iso 

'we ha ither link with Egypt, for 

ill oi us must remember the story in 

the Odyssej oi Proteus ami his herd 

he i iland near the moutn 

of the Nile.' " 



".Voir- and Queries" in discu 

the "M's" in the new volume of the 
"Oxford English Dictionary" reaches 
"Muffin" — which is said to be of ob- 
scure origin and begins in 1703 — antr 
makes this complaint: 

Wc are disappointed not to find 
here the historic gentleman in Bos- 
well's "Life of Johnson"; "Mr. . 

who loved buttered muffins, but durst 
not eat them because they disagreed 
with his stomach., resolved to shoot 
himself". The gentleman may be 
called historic because he was trans- 
ferred into "Pickwick" as "the man 
who. killed himself on principle, after 
eating three shillings' worth of crum- 
pets." 

As for the word "much," how many 
people have known that the queer ex- 
pression, "Much of a muchness," orig- 
inated as far back as 1728? 



New Books at the Public Library 

*The American Indian, by A. J. 
Fynn (Little, Brown, 1907— No. 9/0- 
1:42), sets forth some of the more 
noticeable characteristics of primi- 
tive life — especially primitive life in 
the Southwest — especially relating to 
environment. 

Hours with Men and Books, by 
William Mathews (Griggs, 1895— No. 
814-49: M 42-5). This volume con- 
tains twenty-one .essays on familiar 
topics. The style is somewhat flati- 
tudinous and after reading a para- 
graph or so one at once begins to feel 
instructed. 

Historic New York (Putnams, 1899) 
is a reprint of the Half Moon papers 



Desk* 



Desks 



Desks 



Desks 



Desk* 




Desk] 



Desks 



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14 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



which are monographs relating to the 
local history of New York city, and 
written for the City History Club. 
The twelve papers contain much and 
varied anecdote of early days. A sec- 
one series of papers was printed in 
1899 (No. 974-71:3). 

*Jesus, by Bousset (Putnam, 1906 — 
No. 232-9:47), is a translation from 
the French, giving a modern interpre- 
tation to the life of Christ. The 
book is written in a clear style and 
with popular intent. 

The Quest of the Holy Grail, by 
Ferris Greenslet (Curtis, 1902— No. 
398-2:60), is a paraphrase of the holy 
legends illustrated with reproductions 
of the frieze in the Boston Public 
Library by Edwin Abbey. 

The Centrifugal Pump is a technical 
hand book dealing with the theory 
and practice of hydraulics and written 
by 'Chas H. Innes (1904— No. 621- 
2:4). 

Seventeen volumes of the Interna- 
tional Library of Technology came to 
the shelves this week. 

*Books recommended. 



15he CHUdren of the State 

Herbert W. Lewis 

For the last twenty-five years the 
California system of providing for the 
maintenance of dependent children 
has been held up to censure and con- 
demnation by students of sociological 
subjects from many parts of the 
world. Portions of American pam- 
phlets giving statistical comparisons 
of the results of different systems, 
have been translated into French and 
German and published abroad with 
the implication that the methods fol- 
lowed by the State of California are 
open to great abuse; that they tend to 
produce child deficiency, rather than 
to cure it; that they foster an irre- 
sponsible and pauperized spirit in par- 
ents, and that they are responsible for 
an undue and unnecessary accumula- 
tion of children in institutions, and an 
unnecessary burden upon the treasury 
of the State; that other methods of 
performing the duty of the State to 
needy children are more effective and 
less objectionable; more humane and 
vastly cheaper. 

If these criticisms are just we should 
study better methods and adopt such 
of them as are found available. If 
they are not just we should repel 
them and clear ourselves and the fair 
name of our State from unwarranted 
approbrium. 

In either case a little attention to 
the subject just now will be timely for 
within a few weeks the legislature 
will pass an appropriation of nearly 
half a million dollars which will be 
paid in different amounts to a multi- 
tude of institutions for the care of 
nearly eight thousand children. 

The expenditure of four or five hun- 
dred thousand dollars per year upon 
work which is said to have a bad so- 
ciological effect, and to be largely un- 
necessary, is in itself a matter of some 
public importance; but the demorali- 
zation of thousands of parents by of- 
fering them free opportunity for push- 
ing off their children to be public de- 
pendents during all the years of their 



helpless infancy is a matter of such 
moment that the mere waste of great 
sums of money taken from the people 
of the state in the form of taxes levied 
against their property and commerce 
must seem insignificant by compari- 
son. 

For purposes of comparison and 
contrast the salient features of the 
systems in vogue in California and in 
Michigan should be set over against 
one another. The State of Michigan 
is selected for the purpose of this 
comparison because the system in that 
state is typical and unmixed and be- 
cause it has been in operation long 
enough to enable us to judge of its 
results. 

The population of the State of 
Michigan is practically two and a half 
millions, and the state supports an 
average of 160 children, and looks af- 
ter 1,500 who are residing in the 
homes of citizens of the> state. The 
cost to the state in 1905 was $42,800. 

The population of the State of Cali- 
fornia is about a half million less than 
that of Michigan, and this state con- 
tributed, for the fiscal year 1905, to 
the support of 7,301 children the sum 
of $433,701. 

The ratio of child dependency in 
California will average from year to 
year one dependent child to each two 
hundred and eighty of the population. 

It has often been stated and it is 
accepted as true that the average ra- 
tio of child dependency to population 
in Michigan is one to 10,000 of the 
population. 

The statements of the expenditures 
and ratios given above exclude the 
expenditures on account of state re- 
form or correctional schools in both 
instances. 

There are no children sound in mind 
and body supported at county ex- 
pense in Michigan while in California 
the City and County of San Francisco 
alone is approaching the one hundred 
thousand dollar mark for this pur- 
pose. 

All county expenditures are exclud- 
ed from the comparisons here made, 
but it is a significant and striking fact 
that in addition to expenditures by 
the state the City and County of San 
Francisco is spending for the same 
purpose more than twice as much 
money as the whole State of Michi- 
gan. 

The figures for Michigan do not in- 
clude infants under one year of age, 
while those for California do include 
these for the reason that it is very 
difficult to get the accounts sufficiently 
in detail to make the exclusion of in- 
fants possible. 

On the other hand, there are ten 
times as many child-caring institu- 
tions soliciting and receiving support 
from private sources in California as 
in Michigan. They are largely the 
same institutions which receive the 
great sums parceled out by the State 
and it would be a good guess that 
their income from private sources 
must be equal to or greater than that 
from the State. 

How far are these very wide dif- 
ferences due to the systems of child 
care in vogue in the two States? 



There are certain salient features of 
these systems which distinguish them: 

(1) In the Michigan system the de- 
pendent children are gathered into one 
State institution, from which they are 
distributed as rapidly as may be to the 
homes of persons who are suitable and 
willing to receive them. Thus the 
state conducts its own business 
through its own officers and for its 
own purposes. 

In the California system the State 
delegates to a multitude of private 
charities a legal agency to conduct for 
the State its business of caring for 
dependent children, in their institu- 
tions through their officers and ac- 
cording to their ideas. 

(2) In the Michigan system there 
is a uniform test and judicial determin- 
ation of the fact as to whether any 
child is actually and necessarily de- 
pendent. This precedes reception and 
support by the State. 

In the California system there is no 
uniform test and no legal determina- 
tion of dependency. There is no offi- 
cial inquiry as to necessity. The 
State has no voice in the selection of 
its beneficiaries, has made no binding 
regulations governing their reception, 
and has no facilities adequate to the 
task of finding out which and how 
many of the children whom it sup- 
ports have parents and relatives who 
might be compelled to support them. 

(3) In the Michigan system the of- 
ficers of the State institution are 
charged with the duty of finding fam- 
ily homes for the children. Thus they 
are rapidly passed on from State sup- 



port to independent positions and dis- 
appear from the list of state benefi- 
ciaries. 

In California the State exercises no 
control over the dismissal of state- 
aided children from institutions. It 
places no limitation upon the length 
of time for which it will contribute to 
the support of any child, except the 
age limit of fourteen years. It em- 
ploys no agency for moving children 
into the homes of the people. Mana- 
gers of the institutions in selecting 
children to be dismissed generally 
select those (other things being equal) 
for whose support the State does not 
pay, as those over fourteen years of 
age or those not orphaned or aban- 
doned in a legal sense and therefore 
not eligible for State aid. Thus in 
California the State-aided children are 
likely to be the first to be received 
and the last to be dismissed. 

(4) In the Michigan system the 
children are wards of the State. If 
parents wish to reclaim them they can 
make application for them on the 
same conditions as others and upon 
showing that they are able to proper- 
ly care for the children and are fit to 
be entrusted with the responsibility 
they can recover them and keep them 
as long as they maintain a proper 
home for the children, and no longer. 

In California an able-bodied fathei 
can place his motherless children in 
an asylum which will thereafter re- 
ceive on their behalf the regular 
amount allotted from the State for 
the support of half orphans. He may 
avoid legal abandonment of them by 




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IS 



into th* tr the institution. If 

he marries and :hcr family 

and neglects to make it known to the 
officers of the institution no one will 
look him u I as the children 

of his first wife reach the age of four- 
teen years he can take them away 
from the institution, put them at work 
and collect their bey belong 

to him whether he be a Kind ind af- 
i arunken brute 
who will sell their clothes and drive 
them into the streets to get money 
ley may. 

A volume might be written of true 
incidents illustrating this phase of the 
question, but this is not the time nor 
place for relating them. Let him 
challenge the statement who will. The 
if will not he far to seek. 

There are other equally anomalous 
conditious here which can not be dis- 
I at this time. Enough has bcei: 
said to show that the system in vogue 
in California causes an appearance of 
extraordinary need of care of children. 
It tends to the needless multiplication 
of institutions whose object is to re- 
lieve a need apparent, perhaps, but not 
real. 

With every intention to do right 
they arc not guided, in many instances, 
by that sort of worldly wisdom which 
stops to investigate a hard luck story 
before calling upon the State for relief 
of the one who tells it. They offer 
too many inducements to weak par- 
ents and relatives to push off upon the 
State and private charity children in 
no real sense dependent. 

A secretary of the- State Board of 
Examiners stated a few years ago in 
the course of a public address that a 
good many thousand dollars had been 
saved to the State through a reglua- 
tion requiring applicants for the ad- 
mission of children to institutions to 
make the application in writing and 
to sign it with their name and address. 
Now, if so small a thing as that would 
save the State several thousand dol- 
lars, what would happen if the State 
should set out to investigate in earnest 
the necessities and conditions and 
mode of life of the parents and near 
relatives of the thousands of half or- 
phans and abandoned children to 
whose support it now contributes, and 
should refuse to support farther those 
whose parents and relatives might be 
made to provide for them? It is a 
perfectly safe guess that such a policy 
honestly carried out would enable the 
legislature to cut the appropriation 
for support of children as much as 
$10,000 for every year for the next 
few years. 

If we should at the same time pro- 
ceed farther and investigate the so- 
cieties in the State which are finding 
homes in private families for depen- 
dent children, and having selected the 
best one of them, we should make it 
responsible to the State for the high 
quality of the work which it should 
do, and then give into the guardian- 
ship of that society for transfer to 
family homes the children who have 
no one to whom they are bound by 
ties of blood or whose parents and 
relatives are unfit to have them, we 



might cut off other tl 
lars every year until i the 

amount now appropriated would cover 
the whole remaining need. 

This need would be made up of un- 
placablc children (those in sonic way 
abnormal), and those held for worthy 
parents who would be in temporary 
distress. There would also be always 
on hand a small number of new ar- 
rivals and returns. These might be 
provided for as now. 

Two questions remain to be an- 
swered. 

Is such .1 policy practicable for Cali- 
fornia? 

Is it desirable? 

As to its practicability: A plan 
which operates as we have seen for 
Michigan, which is acceptable as a 
State policy in Massachusetts, Min- 
nesota, Iowa, Wisconsin, Colorado 
and Oregon is worthy of a trial in 
California. One society in New York 
City has placed out, mostly in the 
Middle West, over eighty thousand 
children. The people of New York 
think well of it. 

The societies making up the federa- 
tion known as the National Children's 
Home Society, organized in thirty-two 
states, have found homes for twenty- 
eight thousand children. The Chil- 
dren's Home Society of California has 
placed more than one thousand. Of 
course these great works have not 
been accomplished without mistakes 
having been made, but the beauty of 
the thing is that systematic visitation 
and watchfulness over placed-out chil- 
dren is a cardinal principle with these 
societies and mistakes, if made, are 
discovered and corrected promptly. 
Nothing human has ever worked quite 
perfectly but some plans are better 
than others. 

What can be done throughout the 
rest of the world can be done here. 
The Catholic Churrh ha. -rented the 
Catholic Home Bureau oi Sew York 
and the Catholic Visitation and Aid 
Society of Chicago, both home-finding 
societies. What that church admits 
for New York and Illinois it can ad- 
mit for California. 

Is it desirable? Will it be better 
for the future citizens of this State 
to be congregated in asylums or to be 
placed singly as members of families 
where they will meet the same diffi- 
culties and enjoy the same advantages 
as all other children. 

Whichever is better let us have it, 
whatever it costs. 

The only reasonable argument 
which can be opposed to the plan of 
placing out children is the one which 
claims that a sufficient number of 
homes of the right kind can not be 
found. 

To this the home-finding societies 
reply that they stand ready to demon- 
strate the correctness of their con- 
tention that the homes are here and 
can be found. 

It is just as easy to find a hundred 
married couples who are capable of 
giving a good home to one child as 
it is to find one man and one woman 
who as superintendent and matron of 
an institution can successfully manage 
one hundred children. 



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PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



Vol. VI. Mo. 5. 



Los JIngeles, California, January 16, 1909- 



10 Cents $2.00 a Year 



Published Every Saturday 

Lissner Building, Los Angeles, California, by the 

PACIFIC OUTLOOK COMPANY 

Subscription price $2.00 a year in advance. 

Single copies 10 cents at all news stands. 

NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERS— The Pacific Out- 
look is mailed to subscribers through the Los 
Angeles Post Office every Friday, and should 
be delivered in every part of the city by Satur- 
day's post. If for any reason it should be de- 
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by giving them immediate notice. 

Entered as second-class mailer April c, 1007, at the poitomce at 
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The Editor of the Pacific Outlook cannot guarantee to return 
manuscript* lough he will endeavor to do »o if stamps for that purpose 
are inclosed with them. If your manuscript is valuable, keep a copy of it. 



THE PACIFIC OUTLOOK'S POLICY 
The Pacific Outlook desires to state unequivo- 
cally that it is not tlie organ of any creed, sect, 
political party, organization, corporation or per- 
son, but is absolutely free and untrammelled in 
sociations. 
It stands unqualifiedly, and without fear, for 
that which it believes to be true, clean, honest 
ami right in human affairs — political, secular, 
commercial and industrial; and in its columns 
will always maintain an unprejudiced and im- 
partial attitude in its discussion of all subjects 
of universal or local interest. 

GEORGE BAKER ANDERSON, Editor 

COMMENT 



THE TRUTH OUT 



TRUTH is mighty and will prevail. The 

-ins .if the politician usually find him out. 
1 It- can't fool all the people all the time. 

The country grows smaller. Half a cen- 
tury ago a man living on one side of the con- 
tinent could lose himself on the other. Now 
the railroads and the telegraphs have 
brought the national capital within hailing 
distance of the Golden Gate. 

Probably not one citizen in ten thousand 
reads the Congressional Record, or any por- 
tion of it, except in rare instances when his 
attention is directed to something therein 
of especial interest to him. Politicians who 
go to Washington ostensibly as servants of 
the people and betray their constituencies 
in order that they may serve private inter- 
ests, for one reason or another, rarely per- 
mit themselves to be trapped into public 
utterances that prove their treachery. 
Their lips speak fair, their faces beam bene- 
diction and beatitude; their deeds — but 
that's another story. 

When, not long since, the Southern Pa- 
cific and the Santa Fe railroads announced 
an increase in freight tariffs a number of 
shippers wrote to Joseph L. Bristow, United 
States Senator-elect from Kansas, asking 
for advice and assistance. (It will he re- 



called that Mr. Bristow made a special trip 
to California two or three years ago to in- 
vestigate transportation conditions For 
President Roosevelt, ami in his report he 
1 immended that a government line of 
steamer-- he put in operation between San 
Francisco and the Isthmus of Panama.) 
fsidor Jacobs of San Francisco, who has 
kept closely in touch with Mr. Bristow, re- 
ceived a letter from him a few days ago in 
which he pledged his support. Mr. Bristow 
add- : 

"I don't think anything will be done dur- 
ing this session of congress along the line of 
the recommendations of my report. The 
trouble is that both senators from California 
are opposing the recommendations I made." 

( hie of these traitors to the best interests 
of the state he is supposed to represent in 
A\ ashington is George C. Perkins, by the 
grace of E. H. Harriman a United States 
senator, and re-elected to that office by a 
legislature the majority in which, shame be 
it to the state of California, is yet subservient 
to the railroad in one thing at least. In prac- 
tically all matters of vital concern to the 
railroad he serves, Perkins has proven faith- 
ful. Nothing is to be expected of him in the 
future, as little has been received from him 
in the past. But with Mr. Bristow, a genuine 
friend of California and one who itnder- 
stands her needs, in the senate, there is yet 
a chance that relief from the Southern Pa- 
cific monopoly will be extended by the fed- 
eral government. 

But while the shippers are looking to con- 
gress and the State Legislature for aid they 
are also going forward with their plans for 
an independent steamship line. One promi- 
nent firm has agreed to inaugurate a service 
with two or three steamers if the shippers 
will post the sum of $100,000 for three years 
as a guarantee against loss. It is stated that 
the necessary sum can be obtained without 
trouble. As soon as the money shall have 
been posted a representative of the shipping 
firm will charter the vessels and arrange for 
connections with the Panama railroad. The 
subject has already been presented to the 
Panama canal commission and rates have 
been quoted. It is stated an ample service 
can he provided which will carry freight at 
prices lower than those charged by the 
American-Hawaiian line. 
* + * 
TO RECALL MAYOR HARPER 



who fail to administer the cit \ business with 

integrity and honor. 

The time seems ripe to use the recall 
against Mayor Harper and all the council- 
men who voted for the confirmation of Ed- 
ward Kern a- commissioner of public 
works, as a greatly needed example and 
warning. We shall then have a g I coun- 
cil for ten months. 

Under the present City Charter the coun- 
cil has enormous power and is the most im- 
portant part of the city government. \\ hen 
relief may be had it seems foolish to con- 
tinue to suffer from a self-inflicted disease 
in the body politic. Our city government 
should represent, as far as possible, our 
highest social ideals rather than preventable 
social sores. 

"The holder of any elective office may be 
removed at any time by the electors quali- 
fied to vote for a successor of such incum- 
bent", says the city charter in section 198. 
Having the power of readjustment in our 
hands, are we to remain weakly inert and 
afraid to use it for purification and a right- 
eous housecleaning? 

THE OUTLOOK 



THE recall is a great protection against 
official rascality. By its means the city may 
rid itself of those delinquent public servants 



THE present State Legislature unques- 
tionably is a tremendous improvement over 
all its predecessors of the past two genera- 
tions. While it is true that there is still 
much to be desired, while the coarse hand of 
the Democratic boss of the Republican or- 
ganization is still very plainly in evidence, 
while the bosslets — Burke and Hatton — 
continue to pull wires for the head of the 
Southern Pacific's political bureau, while 
Grove L. Johnson still walks the burning 
deck, while "Eddie" Wolfe and Frank Lea- 
vitt, the latter patron saint of the racetrack 
gamblers, are yet the recognized bosses of 
the senate, while the state still suffers the 
great infliction of Porterism and Political 
Performance, and while Governor Gillett did 
not utter a word on the all-important sub- 
ject of racetrack gambling in his first mes- 
sage to the State Legislature — in spite of 
all these things there is much to be thankful 
for. 

A most brilliant ray of light has pene- 
trated the murky atmosphere which for 
many years has invested the political arena 
at Sacramento. Quietly, calmly, deliberate- 
ly, the true representatives of the people of 
this state in the lower house of the legisla- 
ture have demonstrated that the power of 
the allied forces of corruption is nothing 
e than an incubus — that it ma 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



ended forever in the twinkling of an eye, if, 
indeed, it already has not been ended. 

The gentlemen who go to Sacramento 
prepared to obey the orders issued by Wil- 
liam F. Herrin, through Burke and Hatton, 
for Edward H. Harriman, the actual boss, 
staked the bulk of their political fortunes, 
jointly and severally, on a proposed new set 
of rules which, if adopted, would have en- 
abled a mere handful of gamblers' friends to 
kili the anti-gambling bill or any other 
measure that the people might desire to see 
passed. Their scheme failed by a vote of 
forty-one to thirty-two, the members of the 
Los Angeles county delegation in the as- 
sembly voting for this infamous attempt to 
make possible the defeat of the one big. 
measure on which the people of California 
have set their hearts being Speaker Stanton, 
Walter R. Leeds, J. P. Transue and Harry 
Barndollar. 

In the first test of strength betweeen the 
people and the machine these men fell down, 
aligning themselves with the racetrack gam- 
blers. It is hardly likely that they will plead 
ignorance of the real intent of the proposed 
new rules. 

Speaker Stanton's attitude on this vital mat- 
ter is lamentable. It is to be regretted that he 
has willingly placed himself in a position where 
his constituents have excellent reasons for be- 
lieving that he is on terms of intimacy with 
Walter Parker, physically the biggest, other- 
wise the smallest of the lackeys employed by 
Herrin. On the evening of the first day of 
the session Speaker Stanton was in private con- 
sultation with Parker in the Capital hotel in 
Sacramento. The call may have been simply 
a friendly one, but Mr. Stanton is old enough 
and wise enough to realize that the people of 
California will put but one interpretation on 
such intimacy with a man of the Parker stripe. 

Speaker Stanton named a committee on 
rules headed by the notorious Grove L. John- 
son. It is hardly likely that Stanton will deny 
that he knew fully a month in advance what 
his committee intended to do — that the pro- 
gramme was to endeavor to put through a set 
of rules which would give the Performers, the 
minority, the power to kill all reform legisla- 
tion. 

Stanton has had a splendid opportunity to 
make good. He is in a position where he may 
make for himself a name synonymous with 
political honor. But he has made a mighty 
bad start in taking part in the programme of 
the Performers to stifle all legislation proposed 
in behalf of the people, beginning with the 
Anti-Racetrack Gambling bill, the Initiative 
bill and a first-class Direct Primary bill. 

And yet Stanton's attitude is exactly what 
the Pacific Outlook has prophesied ever since 
he was first mentioned for the speakership. 
Basing our judgment on the estimate placed 
upon him by the Los Angeles Times during 
his previous service in the Legislature this 
paper has had no confidence in him, but at the 
same time it has devoutly hoped that he would 
rise to the opportunity presenting itself. It is 



hard for an aspiring politician like Stanton to 
sever such intimate relations as those he has 
maintained in the past with the Southern Pa- 
cific politicians : where a man's ambitions for 
political preferment fairly boil over it is some- 
times impossible. But if Phil Stanton is a wise 
man he will cut loose, instanter, from the Per- 
formers and stand with the people. 

But in contrast with the presiding officer of 
the senate Stanton is a jewel. If anything 
more than what already has transpired were 
needed to identify Porter, the Political Per- 
former, it was furnished the first week of the 
session in his appointment of committees. One 
committee will do for an illustration. Political 
Performer Porter appointed as senate com- 
mittee on public morals — which will consider 
the anti-racetrack gambling bill — the following 
men, all notoriously opposed to any legislation 
affecting the welfare of this auxiliary of the 
Herrin machine : Senators Weed, Wolfe. Sav- 
age, Leavitt and Kennedy. 

The assembly of 1909 is probably the nearest 
approach to a genuinely representative body 
which California has seen for many years. 
The majority of its members are inclined to 
listen to the voice of the people. But from the 
senate little is to be expected. The worst 
feature of the upper house is the character of 
its chief committees. If ten per cent of the 
voters of each senatorial district who take the 
slightest interest in the impending fight to the 
death between the machine and the represen- 
tatives of the people would sound notes of 
warning for the edification of their senators, 
employing the mails or the telegraph, the legis- 
lation desired, more particularly the Anti-Race- 
track Gambling bill, the Direct Primary and 
the Initiative, would be secured. There are at 
work in Sacramento to secure such legislation 
men who will not grow weary, but they need 
the practical co-operation of the influential 
ones who are at home. If they receive such 
co-operation there is little doubt that all three 
measures will become laws. 
* * * 
VALE FORAKER 



AN EVENT of national importance is the 
passing of Joseph Benson Foraker of Ohio. 
In employing the term "passing" we do not 
use it in the sense in which it is sometimes 
employed, namely, to indicate the departure 
of a human soul into the Great Beyond. 
Those who have passed the Third Reader 
will understand. 

Foraker has rendered himself forevermore 
ineligible for a seat in the United States 
Senate. He has been obscured by Mr. Bur- 
ton, a man of impressive personality, a fig- 
ure towering above and beyond his prede- 
cessor. Viewing the two men from any 
point, all is contrast. In the light of the 
Archbold letters Foraker will be regarded 
hereafter, by all but public exploiters of the 
Archbold type, as unthinkable as a candi- 
date for any high office whatever. He has 
richly earned the contempt in which he is 
held by all respectable men. He will go 



down in history as an enemy of the people — 
an enemy of his country. 

It would be painful, were it not positively 
disgusting, to read such arrant nonsense as 
this, which was telegraphed to the Chicago 
Tribune by its Washington correspondent: 

In the case of Foraker, however, the senate 
suffers a distinct loss. However people may 
differ with him as to his attitude toward the 
policy of the Roosevelt administration, and in 
spite of the unfortunate revelations during the 
campaign connecting him with the Standard Oil 
Company in an unfavorable way, Senator Foraker 
in other respects has been one of the marked 
men of the upper house of congress, and his 
public appearances as well as his committee work 
entitle him to a certain measure of credit which 
should be set over against the blacker marks on 
his record. 

The newspaper apologists for the For- 
akers of the country are not numerous, 
which is well. And they grow fewer. One 
can truthfully say of the devil himself much 
of what the Tribune correspondent says of 
the rigid reactionary from Ohio. . 
* * * 
QUICK WORK NECESSARY 



WHAT is in many respects the most im- 
portant measure ever introduced into a Legis- 
lature of the state of California, is the bill of 
Senator Marshall Black, providing for a con- 
stitutional amendment instituting direct legis- 
lation. The amendment provides, briefly, that 
upon the presentation to the secretary of state 
of a petition signed by at least eight per cent 
of all the votes cast for governor at the last 
preceding election, proposing a law, a statute 
or an amendment to the Constitution, the sec- 
retary must submit such proposed law, 
statute or amendment to the electors at the 
next succeeding general election. It is further 
provided : 

If petitions for the initiation of statutory law 
be filed with the secretary of state not less than 
thirty days before any regular or special session 
of the Legislature, the secretary of state shall 
transmit the same to the Legislature as soon as it 
convenes. Such initiative measures shall tak< : 
precedence over all other measures in the Legis- 
lature excepting appropriation bills. The Legis- 
lature may enact any initiative measure, without 
change or amendment, but in all cases proposed 
amendments to the Constitution must be sub- 
mitted to the electors for approval or rejection. 
If any such initiative measure shall be rejected by 
the Legislature or no action be taken upon it by 
the Legislature within forty days from the date of 
its transmission, the secretary of state shall sub- 
mit it to the electors for approval or rejection at 
the next ensuing general election. The Legisla- 
ture may reject anv measure proposed by initiative 
petition, and propose a different one to accom- 
plish the same purpose, but in such event, both 
measuares shall be submitted to the electors for 
their rejection or approval by the secretary of 
state at the next ensuing general election. The 
veto power of the Governor shall not extend to 
measures adopted by direct vote of the people. A 
statute adopted by direct vote of the people can 
be repealed or amended only by direct vote of the 
people. 

If for any reason any measure proposed by 
petition as herein provided be not submitted at 
the next succeeding general election occurring 
ninety days after the presentation of the said 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



>titun mendmenl 

,,11 lu ' s " 1 '" 

there shall 

by petition 

herein 

■ 
• two-thirds of the mon- 
th houses of the legislature indicates 
that the measure will pa--, in all probability. 
,nh obstacles to its success, if any. will 
mil in the senate, which is practically 
oiled now. as heretofore, l>y such notori- 
ous machine politicians as Frank Leavitt, the 
guardian angel of the racetrack gamblers; 
"Eddie" Wolfe, one of the most effective im- 
plements through which the Southern Pacific 
u,.rk- in the Legislature; and others of this 
-tamp. 'Hir own senator, Mr. McCartney, is 
understood to "have no use for any such 
measures". 

It is our judgment that Senator McCartney 
will be inclined to yield to the wishes of his 
constituent^, provided they are expressed in 
emphatic and unequivocal terms. To that end 
the Pacific Outlook would suggest that such 
organizations as the City Club and the Muni- 
cipal League should adopt resolutions memor- 
ializing all the representatives of this city and 
county in the Legislature : that meetings should 
he held at once at which similar action may be 
taken: that those among us who believe that 
the time has arrived when the Initiative should 
he placed in the hands of the people that they 
may obtain the rights so long denied them. 
should communicate with Senator McCartney 
and the other members of the delegation at 
Sacramento, without delay, urging them to 
work and vole for this most desirable, even 
necessary, legislation. 

Senator Leroy Wright, of San Diego, chair- 
man of the senate committee on election laws, 
through which committee this measure must 
pass before being acted upon by the senate, is 
understood to be rather unfriendly to the hill. 
Senator Wright is amenable to reason, how- 
ever, and the procedure taken in the case of 
Senator McCartney might well be adopted in 
tin case of Senator Wright with reasonable 
holies that it would influence him to act with 
the pepole. 

* * * 

JENTLE SUGGESTION 



■ !> to proper names 
iks 

The Nelson idea, if put into effect, would 
make possible a letter along this line: 

Jencral: 

The jentlemen to whom you refer on pajc two 

it pamphlet seem lacking in jinjer. The 

nous they make an- enrajing. Tiny do no( 

appear to In- familiar with the jeography of their 

own country 

+ + + 
INEXCUSABLE AFFRONT 



WHEN President Roosevelt issued his his- 
toric manifesto on orthography he could not 
have anticipated what has happened at Sacra- 
mento as a direct outgrowth thereof. The 
possibilities secreted in a bill proposed by As- 
semblyman Nelson of San Francisco are fear- 
ful to contemplate. The Nelson idea, as em- 
bo. lied in his bill, is : 

In any and all official state documents printed 
in the slate printing office of the stale of Cali- 
fornia, if there fie any word or words spelled bj 
tile use of what is commonly termed the soft 
sound of tfie letter "G," then such soft sounded 
letter shall fie dropped from the word or words 
in which it appears and the letter "J" shall be 
substituted in its place. Tliis proposed spelling 



11-' IT lies within the power of Senator 
Savage to accomplish his purpose and that ol 
the Southern Pacific, there will be no consoli- 
of 1 ,os Vngeles and any city having a 
frontage upon the waters of San Pedro harbor. 
In the face of the fact that nine persons out of 
ten residing ill the bay city favor annexation to 
Los Angeles. Senator Savage has taken it upon 
himself to declare that the long-anticipated 
project of these two communities, acting as a 
unit, shall not come before the senate for con- 
sideration, lie boasts that it will be smothered. 
This, at least, is what the Sacramento corre- 
spondent of the San Francisco Chronicle de- 
clares. In the newspaper account of the in- 
terview referred to it is stated that 

Savage is authority for the statement that the 
real motive of the Los Angeles delegation is to 
unload a large part of its present indebtedness 
upon the coast town, and he says that as far as 
the consolidation b'll is concerned, it is down and 
out. 

"They have a line charter in Los Angeles," says 
Senator Savage. "It provides that a city coming 
into the fold will pay 10 per cent of its taxes to 
Los Angeles. The people in my city can not see 
it that way. Neither could they for a moment 
consider taking on their shoulders a big slice of 
the Los Angeles indebtedness. Los Angeles is 
now in debt for $40,000,000. At 4-'4 and 5 per cent 
the interest piles up to the big amount of $1,800,- 
000 a year. The idea of the consolidation propo- 
sition is to have San Pedro pay part of that in- 
terest and shoulder some of the indebtedness. 
Well, San Pedro won't do it, and you can say for 
me that the consolidation bill is smothered. 

"The delegation tried their best to keep me out 
as chairman of the Senate Municipal Corpora- 
tions Committee. They did not do it, did they? 
The President of the Senate told them that that 
position was my heritage, because I have had it 
so long. Now watch. They can hook up with 
the Alameda delegation or any other delegation 
which wants consolidation, but the bill will not 
pass the Senate." 

This presumptuous and insolent railroad 
representative from San Pedro is either grossly 
ignorant of the provisions of the bill he dis- 
cusses, or he deliberately misrepresents the 
matter. We do not believe he is ignorant of 
the subject. We have every reason for believ- 
ing that be has understood for some time the 
intent of the bill introduced at the request of 
the people of this city and the harbor towns. 
Savage's contemptible effort to explain away 
bis inimical attitude well illustrates and proves 
the rascality back of the project to keep Los 
Angeles from the sea and the harbor towns 
from enjoying the advantages they seek. It 
will be useless, perhaps, but we nevertheless 
will direct the attention of Southern Pacific 



Senator Savage to the following clauses oi 

ii -t of the bill which he declar 
ntted to pass the senate : 

That no property lei of the municipal i n 

us consolidated under tl 
all evei be taxed to 
any indebtedness or liability 

lions, contracted prior to or existing 
at the til ch con solid 

These words are unequivocal. They explain 
themselves. They are quoted here ill evidi 

of our original contention, i. e., thai Senator 
Savage is either grossly ignorant of the bill he 
discusses, or he deliberately misrepresents the 

matter. 

Put an) way we view it, we cannot escapi 
the conviction that he has overreached himself 
in his apparently studied affront to the intel- 
ligence of practically his entire constituency, 
lie is a whole volume of argument in favor of 
the adoption of the Initiative into our scheme 

of legislation. 

•fr ♦ ♦ 

DUPLEX ACTION 



SENATOR Perkins is a phenomenon, lie 
can hold two contrary opinions at the same 
moment. He can be fish and fowl in the same 
stewpan. 

Last week Senator Perkins was nominated 
to succeed himself. This week he was re- 
elected. After the caucus which began the per- 
formance of the Harriman programme Perkins 
sent to his friend Frank Leavitt, state senator, 
Performer and beneficiary of racetrack gam- 
bling, likewise chairman of the Performers' 
caucus, a telegram reading as follows : 

Permit me to return to you, and through you 
to the members of the joint Republican caucus of 
the Legislature, my grateful appreciation for their 
loyal friendship in nominating me as my own 
successor in the United States Senate. I beg to 
assure you and them that no effort shall be spared 
on my part in fidelity and devotion to duty to 
represent to the best of my ability the welfare 
and interest of our State and country, and strive 
to be worthy of the confidence the people of Cali- 
fornia have reposed in me. 

A few days ago J. L. Dristow, United States 
Senator-elect from Kansas, wrote to a gentle- 
man in San Francisco to the effect that it 
would be almost impossible for Californians to 
gain the consent of the federal government to 
help them to solve their transportation problem, 
because of the opposition of both senators from 
California. 

Is any man in all California such a fool as 
to believe Perkins to have left one spark of 
sincerity, after reading' his telegram to Per- 
former Leavitt? "Fidelity and devotion to 
duty!" Faugh! Balderdash! Duplicity! It's 
fidelity and devotion to the Southern Pacific — 

that's what it is. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

TILLMAN 



THE OFFENSE of Senator Tillman in be- 
coming in the remotest degree a party to spec- 
ulation in government lands in < Jregon is not a 
criminal offense, but is an indication of a 
standard of ethics which, when found in i 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



of Senator Tillman's repute, is superlatively 
deplorable. 

Tillman, it would appear, belongs to that 
type which, in the United States Senate, has 
been best exemplified by men like Foraker, 
Piatt and Quay. From the evidence, Tillman 
has not always regarded public office in the 
light of a sacred public trust. In fact, there 
are strong indications that he does not stand 
far from that point where he might be per- 
suaded to view public office as a private sine- 
cure, provided the temptation to do the sinecure 
act may be kept in the background. 

Tillman coveted some fine timber land in 
Oregon, the title to which was held under a 
government grant, conditioned that it be sold 
at $2.50 per acre. The grantees refusing to 
comply with this condition, a campaign to 
annul their title was inaugurated. While this 
was entirely legitimate, and possibly commend- 
able, it is not legitimate that a senator of the 
United States should use his official power, 
directly or indirectly, to increase his own 
wealth. But this is exactly what Tillman ap- 
pears to have done. From a letter written to 
a man who financed the movement, we take the 
following extract : 

If I can succeed in causing the government to 
institute suit for the recovery of the land and 
make it easier for others as well as myself, I shall 
do it without regard to the dealings with your 
firm. I still want to get some of the timher land, 
if it is possible, and as it is probable that Mr. Lee 
or some other representative of mine will be in 
your country in the next two months, we will 
leave the matter of payment for the initiatory 
steps and subsequent proceedings in abeyance for 
the present. Any contract we might make will 
be entirely apart from and independent of my 
work here in the senate. I will be glad for you 
to hold in reserve eight of the best quarter sec- 
tions of which you have definite information, and 
I will in the meantime press the investigation and 
other work here, which will facilitate the final 
purchase and in effect obviate the necessity of 
your making any case in court at all. 

Tillman had a sagacious representative in 
Oregon, one Lee, who wrote to the promoters 
that his principal would "set up such a howl in 
Washington that it will be impossible to do 
otherwise" than start the government doing 
"something along the line you desire." It 
looks as if Tillman did "set up a howl", but 
subsequently, when the postoffice department 
began an investigation of the Oregon end of 
the business, Tillman straightened himself up 
and loudly repudiated the entire proposition on 
the floor of the United States Senate. Presi- 
dent Roosevelt charges that this repudiation 
and the denunciation accompanying it was "a 
wanton attack to cover up Senator Tillman's 
own transactions". Could any further evidence 
be desired publicly to convict the pitchfork 
statesman of the scuth of attempting to use his 
official position for personal profit and of de- 
ceiving- his fellow-members of congress ? 

Those who have kept a vigilant eye upon the 
White House ; who have made a note of the 
accusations made at various times by Presi- 
dent Roosevelt against men in public office, 
exalted or otherwise ; who have discerned tjie 



panic which has been caused in certain quar- 
ters, from time to time, by what has proven to 
be the well-grounded charges of the executive, 
will await with keen interest the official out- 
come of the Tillman incident. We predict that 
history will repeat itself, as it has scores of 
times during the present administration, and 
that Senator Tillman will be compelled to ac- 
cept the g"ift of free admission into the now 
ponderous but still expanding Ananias Club. 
* * * 
CHILE CON CARNE 



Bv Autogenesis 
Dogmas by the Dozen. — Cardinal Logue, 
during his visit to America, was asked how 
many sermons a preacher could prepare in 
a week. 

Smiling, Cardinal Logue answered : 
"If the preacher is a man of extraordinary 
ability he can prepare one sermon ; if a man 
of average ability, two ; if an ass, ten or 
twelve-" 



Laughing in Five Keys. — Once upon a 
time a saddened humorist who wanted to 
imprison mirth in statistics, said that there 
were only five humorous stories extant, all 
stories being but varied forms of the orig- 
inal five. Gen. Taylor who is something of 
a wit himself remarks : "The story doesn't 
amount to anything. It is the edition that 
counts." If men can be ridiculous in only 
five ways there is still hope that they may 
soon be cured of their folly, when the only 
funny thing left in the world will be their 
preposterous self-esteem. 



English Suffragettes. — If anyone had 
asked us ten years ago whether we saw any 
objection, says the London Academy, to the 
enfranchisement of women with a property 
qualification, we should probably have said 
that we did not see anything against it. 
Now it has been made clear to unprejudiced 
people that the right sort of women don't 
want votes ; and those who do want them 
have proved over and over again that they 
are the wrong kind of women : women who 
are inflated with vanity and love of no- 
toriety, women who are without sense of 
honor, women who are without sense of 
decency, unnatural women, and women who 
are inspired by an insane and abnormal 
hatred of the other sex, and an equally in- 
sane and abnormal admiration of their own 
sex. We do not say that there are not hon- 
orable exceptions but they are few, and thev 
are intellectually insignificant. A certain 
number of charming, amiable, well-meaning, 
and even gifted people can always be en- 
listed in any cause. . . . Decent wom- 
en, on the whole, don't want it, and men of 
all kinds are against it in the proportion of 
about ten to one. 



stands for love and friendship in the mystic 
callender of soothsayers and folk of that ilk. 
It has the further reputed value of bein<* 
a charm against intoxication- It should 
therefore be precious in the eyes of sobrietv 
and the vendors of patent medicines. 



Automobile Poker. — Freight car poker has 
had its day. It is now to be succeeded by 
automobile poker which is played in very 
much the same fashion. When three or four 
men are in an auto or on a walking trip and 
seek an intelligent diversion they may agree 
on automobile poker, get out pencils and 
paper and wait for machines to pass. The 
first man sets down the registry number of 
the first motor that comes in sight, the sec- 
ond does the same with the next "red devil," 
and so on, until every one in the game has 
a "hand." Then there is a "show down." 
Of course there are no face cards, but all the 
rest of the component parts of a poker deal 
are to be had, thus: One, ace; two deuce, 
and so on up to the zero, which is called a 
ten. 



Thirteenth Century Food. — The barons 
and bandits of the thirteenth century had a 
varied diet to procure which thev may have 
had need to urge a tardy exchequer bv 
whacking their neighbors a bit. Besides the 
"fowl of Africa and the rare gadwit of 
Ionia" mentioned by Fitzstephen, gourmets 
in the time of King John used to regale them- 
selves on herons, cranes, crows, storks, 
cormorants, and bitterns. Some would wash 
their meals down with wine ; but the ma- 



<^V£^^ = 



The Amethyst for Prohibitionists. — Fash- 
ion has decreed that the amythyst is to be 
the fashionable "lucky stone" for 1909. It 



So.Broadway ^^pllJJIIIp** So. Hill Street 
A. PUSBNOT CO. 

Our Semi-Annual 
Clearance Sale 




Is now going on in all sections of the store. 

The crowd of buyers who have attended 
this sale is but the natural result of making 

GENUINE REDUCTIONS 

IN PRICES 

ON ALL ODDS AND ENDS 

AND BROKEN ASSORTMENTS. 

If you have not been in we can not say 
too strongly — better hurry — for the sale 
will soon be over. Such savings keep the 
people coming and the goods sroing. 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



drank mead ur mcthcglin. Me.i 

Holinshed, was only the washinp 
nf tlu ;cr ihe honey had been taken 

them, am hat it 

had : ed, peppered, "r made palat- 

able with swcetbriar or thyme. But Methe- 
ulin contained 1 cwt. of honey to twenty- 
water, and must have been 
much more intoxicating than the strongest 
the present day. — London 
nicle. 



A Thumping Wooing. — A certain club for 

firls in the East-end of London had 

recently elected a new member, and one day 

the secretary happened to look out pf the 

window, and was surprised to see the new 
member rush up to a strange lad in the 

street, punch him violently Oil the head, and 
then run away. The secretary remonstrated 
with her sharply, to which the new member 
made reply: "I'm very sorry: I won't do 
more if it's agin' the rules: but per- 
you won't mind telling me, then, how 
am I ever to get engaged?" 



Kipling "Done" — We are not unfamiliar 
with the ways of the tourist in California. 
Many visitors to the coast probably "do" 
the missions in the well recognized Eu- 
ropean Style ( )ur celebrities are, however, 
spared the experience which befell Rudvard 
Kipling. < Ine day when at work in his 
study a gentleman, evidently a traveler, ap- 
peared at his door. With him were two 
schoolboys. Without any preliminaries the 
stranger asked, "Are you Rudyard Kip- 
ling?" "Yes." "Boys, this is Rudyard Kip- 
ling. Is this where yen write?" "Yes." 
"Boys, this is where he writes. Is this house 
vour own?" "Yes." "Boys, this house is 
his own." And before the bewildered 
novelist had time even to ask them to be 
seated, they had rushed awav. 
* * * 

Creat Demagogues of History 

Take, for instance, the assertion that Caesar 
was a "demagogue". To read the newspaper 
notices, one would fancy that this character- 
ization was original with Ferrero. As a matter 
of fact, writes Harry Thurston Peck in the 
Bookman, Mommsen in his fourth volume 
specifically declares that Caeser was a dema- 
gogue for a time in order to keep bis hold upon 
the people as against the aristocracy. But he 
was nut the sort of demagogue whose sole aim 
is to please the people. He uses them ami con- 
trols them as a statesman must, but only in 
order to accomplish a statesman's purpose. 
History is full of demagogues in this high 
sense, which is, indeed, the etymological sense. 
There have been many of these "leaders of the 
people", and every one of them stands out in 
clear and telling contrast with the man who is 
only a politicastro. Some statesmen have been 
so happily circumstanced or so austere by na- 
ture as to dominate the people without using 
auv demagogic arts. Such was Washington, 
and the two Pitts, and such was Bismarck ; but 
men like these are very rare. Caesar, during a 



certain i>ortioii of his career, was a demagogue. 

as were Palmerston and Beaconsfield and Glad- 
stone in England, and as were Jefferson anil 
Jackson and Roosevelt in the United States. 

Even Lincoln in the stress of the Civil War 
sometimes held a candle to the devil. Hut the 
demagogue of this type is always the man who 
has a definite end to reach and who emplo} 
such necessary instruments as are at hand. It 
is in this senre that Caesar was a demagogue. 
as .Mommsen long ago pointed out, and as 
Ferrero now repeats — not really as a new dis- 
cover) of his own, lint as a truism of Roman 
history. 

* * * 

Zoology and Flags 

The American flag has become, perhaps, the 
most familiar object in Sydney, and it is in- 
teresting to recall one of the earliest designs 
for the ilag. In 1776 South Carolina adopted 
a flag with a rattlesnake on it of thirteen 
rattles, the number having reference to the 
thirteen revolting states. Zoology figures very 
largely on the flags of different nations. On 
our own royal standard is the lion. It was 
Richard Coeur de Lion, by the way, who altered 



the device from leopards to lions on the ki 

standards of both Russia and Germany, and 

both the lion and the eagle on thai of Spain. 

says the Sydney News. 

Bulgaria has a lion, China a dragon and 
Mexico a bird quarreling with a snake. Taken 
altogether with the animals that appear on 
nations' amis, the royal unicorn and Austra- 
lian emu ami kangaroo, a fairly comprehensive 

collection could be made from national em- 
blems. 

To these may he added the white mouse, 
which has been adopted for the pennant of the 
submarine branch of the royal navy as a deli- 
cate compliment to the powers of white mice 
t'i detect escaping fumes from the petrol en- 
gines. Is is a singularly unvvarlike device for 
such a deadly service. 

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[WAY SIDE PRE SS! 
1 Printing § 



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Thi AMERICAN COMMERCIAL 
COMPANY, Ltd. 

LOS ANGELES. CALIFORNIA 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



Misfit Names of Railroads 

Did it ever occur to you," asked the 
Assistant Passenger Agent, "how in- 
appropriately many of the railroads of 
the country are named? So<me of 
them have far outgrown the modest 
titles with which they started, and 
others have never realized the grand 
ambitions of their infancy. Take the 
New York, New Haven & Hartford, 
for instance. New Haven and Hart- 
ford are now mere way stations. 
Hartford isn't even on the main line. 
It would have been logical if the road 
had taken the name of the New York 
& New England, one of the smaller 
concerns which it gobbled up about fif- 
teen years ago, but, of course, mere 
exactness is trifling in comparison 
with the inconvenience of such a 
change. In Boston, they call it the 
Consolidated Road, which is proper 
enough. Here in New York it is the 
New Haven line, which is as fitting 
as it would be to call the Pennsyl- 
vania Company the Trenton Road. 

"New York Central & Hudson River 
is all right for the parent corporation, 
but it is wretchedly inadequate for the 
giant system which consists of a dozen 
roads in as many States, the cars of 
which are marked 'New York Central 
Lines.' The Hudson River end of the 
line is only a trifling part of the huge 
mileage, and those two words could 
well be dropped. The case of the 
Pennsylvania is similar. It, too, has 
thousands of miles of tracks outside 
the State from which it takes its 
name. In fact, the expenditures in 
New York City and harbor, both for 
.passenger and freight traffic, have 
practically made Philadelphia a way 
station. The fastest trains only pass 
through the suburbs of the city. 

"The name of the Delaware, Lacka- 
wanna & Western omits mention of 
the chief terminus of the road — New 
York. The word 'Erie' isn't particu- 
larly descriptive, but the title is lots 
more convenient than the former 
cumbersome one — New York, Lake 
Erie & Western. The Philadelphia & 
Reading has far outgrown the limits 
originally set for it; so have the Louis- 
ville & Nashville, the Baltimore & 
Ohio, the Chesapeake & Ohio, the 
Chicago & Alton, the Chicago & Rock 
Island, the Chicago, Burlington & 
Quincy, the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. 
Paul, the Illinois Central, and a lot of 
others. Atchison, Topeka, and Santa 
Fe are all insignificant points on a 
magnificent road that stretches from 
Chicago to San Francisco. 

"Some names, however, are an anti- 
climax. The Missouri Pacific never 
gets a whiff of the salt sea breeze; 
the St. Louis and San Francisco 
doesn't come within a thousand miles 
of living up to its announcement. 

"A number of companies, though, 
have what you might call blanket 
appellations, broad enough to cover 
a big or even an indefinite develop- 
ment. Such are the Southern, the 
New York, Ontario & Western, the 
Northern Pacific, Great Northern, 
Southern Pacific, and Grand Trunk. 
Tlie name 'Union Pacific' has an 
appropriateness since it became the 



backbone of the great Harriman sys- 
tem, of which its projectors never 
dreamed. 

"The most absurd and illogical 
name of all, though, is the Western 
Pacific. Of course, a Pacific road 
would be in the West. It should have 
been called the Midland Pacific or the 
Colorado Pacific. 'Western Pacific' is 
about as tautological as 'round 
circle.' " 

* * * 

"Seeing Things" at NigKt 

Every one must at times have asked 
himself why familiar objects in a dim 
light tend to assume fantastic and 
oftentimes alarming appearances. The 
explanation, according to the British 
Medical Journal, is to be found in the 
special conditions of night vision. 
The pupils are widely dilated and, as 
in the photographic lens with a large 
diaphragm, the apparatus of accom- 
modation can only focus for one 
plane. As the faculty of estimating 
distances is in great measure lost in 
the obscurity we cannot focus with 
precision, and a blurred uncertain out- 
line is thrown upon the retina. 

Then, too, colors viewed in a fading 
light lose their distinguishing hue in a 
fixed sequence until a point is reached 
at which everything becomes of one 
uniform gray tint. 

It follows that the images which are 
transmitted to the visual centres are 
profoundly modified in color and out- 
line, and as they enter the eye through 
the widely dilated pupil at an alto- 
gether unusual angle the movement of 
locomotion gives them a peculiar mo- 
bility. 

Now, one relies on experience for 
the interpretation of sensorial im- 
pressions, and when these present 
themselves suddenly in an unusual 
form they create a feeling of inse- 
curity which finds expression in men- 
tal perturbation and more or less vio- 
lent motor impulsion. In fact the sub- 
ject finds himself in the position of a 
horse which sees a rapidly advancing 
automobile for the first time and does 
not know what to make of it. 

Imagination aiding, these blurred, 
mobile and uncertain images are sus- 
ceptible of the most phantasmagoric 
interpretation, and in persons who are 
not accustomed to control sensorial 
impressions by the exercise of the in- 
telligence the impressions are ac- 
cepted as realities and acted upon ac- 
cordingly. 

Gamekeepers and others who are 
accustomed to night work make allow- 
ance for phenomena of this class and 
correct the visual deficiency by the 
aid of other senses, such as hearing, 
which are not dependent on light. 

+ * * 

Where "Was He? 

Old Mr. Flaherty was a general 
favorite in the little town where he 
lived. The doctor was away all one 
summer and did not hear of the old 
man's death. Soon after his return 
he met Miss Flaherty and inquired 
about the family, ending with: 
■ "And how's your father standing the 
heat?" ' 



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PACIFIC OUTLOOK 




■ itlook >-r I '■ 
stud) of the primal > systems lit 



t was Willi. I 'oat, a well- 

■ iii othei i i alitor, i 



r thai 

. Will 

actual practice. The 

II on 

which ii is intended. 

his trui]: i- nowhere better 
'lian in nur present primary 
in system, in theory our -> - 
[ primary elections t* repri 

■ t_v membi 
the party through del 1 1 i — 

voice in the sell 
party's nominees ami in formu- 
lating the sentiments of his party plat- 
In reality he i- seldi ni repre- 
! at all in the true sense of the 
and the whole representative 
frequently becomes a ma- 
controlled and 
by a few self-chosen cunning 
politicians who make politics theii 
business for the attainment of their 
own mercenary e 

One taking a merely cursory glance 
might pronounce it an ideal system 
he representative government of 
a party; hut a careful study of the 
system and practical experience with 
its workings bring to light some glar- 
fects. 
hi the first place, it is a complicated 
system, and the usual confused and 
intricate conditions Wrought about by 
the large number of candidates for 
the various ofl Ci - require a greater 
in. and more careful study 
than tie average voter can afford to 
This is especially true in the 
towns ind cities where it is 
next to impossible to have a personal 
knowledge of the numerous candi- 
dal -. or to know the sentiment of the 
il delegates regarding the candi- 
dates for the various offices to be 
filled Take for example our own 
county convention, which must pro- 
vide fifteen or more offices with nom- 
inees, and une cm easily see, espe- 
cially if lie has taken an active inter- 
in the primary election, that it is 
next to impossible to find a delegate 
i.r a set nf delegates for which to vote 
who would represent the voter's senti- 
ments in the choice for each individual 
office. 

The voter ni a precinct may desire 
in have Brown nominated for sheriff 
ami Junes fur clerk. He may vote 
I'm,- a lisl of delegates at the primary 
election w ho are favorable to Brown, 
but a! the same time he may be com- 
pelled I" sacrifice bis wishes as to a 
choice b>r clerk ; and so on down the 
list. In fact, voting Eot .1 set of dele- 
gati to 1 county convention amounts 
merel) to deli g tting ti 1 a few men 



bsolutc authority to nominate on 
lie entire party of thi 
out instructions ur 1 
of any kind: ur at most with re- 
card to une candidate. A delegation 
may, and frequently does, cm 

instructed to vote and 
work fl >r a caiu'i mi of- 

1 ill all other interests are sacri- 
ficed to tbe one, 1 ''. to the nomina- 
tion of [hi - 1 ndidate; and 
then too often the candidate who is 
best "wire puller," the best "log 
roller," ur whose manager is the best 
the 1 me who secures the 
ted nomination. 

The men cliusen a- delegates to a 
convention are in too many instances 
men who de-ire to attend the conven- 
tion fur personal reasons ur to iurthei 
some personal end, rather than nun 
who have the party's welfare at heart. 
A few of the self-chosen leading 
lights in the precinct who understand 
"the game" usually get together in 
private caucus before the convention 
and lay their plans fur creating a 
sentiment in favor of certain dele- 
gates. There is John Smith who 
wishes to be a deputy county clerk, 
and has been promised the job if he 
will assist in the nomination of his 
particular candidate for the office of 
county clerk; and George Thompson, 
wdio has been promised a contract 
with the county if his pet candidate 
fur supervisor can be elected, and so 
on. 

There may not be anything par- 
ticularly dishonorable in this, but it 
does not tend to the selection of a 
delegation who will nominate the 
best men for the respective offices; nor 
do such delegates represent in a true 
sense of the word the party sentiment 
of the precinct. Those who have had 
experience in attending political core 
editions know that quite a large pro- 
portion of the convention is made up 
of men of this class and as a result 
shrewd politicians rather than com- 
petent men often receive the nomina- 
tion. 

Again, the delegates themselves are 
not always chosen by the party vote. 
There is in every precinct and city a 
greater or less number of men who 
are devoid of political murals, who 
are willing to give their assistance to- 
ward the furtherance of the schemes 
of their political friends, regardless 
of party. Unfortunately, there are 
frequently a sufficient number of this 
class I" turn the balance at a primary 

election, In the contest in this coun- 
ty between Messrs. Flint and Bard 
fu,- tin- delegation to the legislature, 
ihe writer saw Democrats, Socialists 
and Prohibitionists vote for the Re- 
I ublican delegates, and many times 



By Cb msi is a. Tost 

iblicans. In 



precinct at least, ami 
enough of these outsider: are 
1 in iw n to havi 1 .'I .'I iu turn the ■ lie 
Ction in tiial precinct. 

While ill, in our primary 

law arc quite numerous and conspicu- 
ous, yet the system is nul all bad. 
lli. Australian or secret ballot thai is 
used 1- an excellent feature; and the 
arrangement by which all parties hold 
their primaries on the same date, at 
the same place, and with the same set 
of electii m officers, is also to lie com- 
mended. 

The greatest fault seems to be in 
the representative plan, i. e.. in having 
tbe nominations made by a conven- 
tion of delegates rather than by the 
direct vote of the members of the 
party. Such a convention can easily 
be controlled by a few scheming poli- 
ticians, and too frequently such is the 
case. 

It seems that the great reform that 
is needed is some arrangement by 
which the nominations may be made 
by the voters themselves. A number 
of states have laws tending to bring 
this about, which vary in many cases 
iu certain details, but all are based on 
the same general principle of direct 
primaries. One of the most success- 
ful plans, seemingly, that I have no- 
ticed is the one adopted by the Re- 
publican party of Jackson County, 
Kansas. This plan is not embodied in 
a law. but is merely the method adopt- 
ed by this particular party. While 
no convention is held, yet each pre- 
cinct or township is given a repre- 
sentation or representative vote ac- 
cording to the number of Republican 
votes cast at the last general election: 
i. e., for example if Whiting township 
should have cast fifty Republican 
votes, and Cass township should have 
cast 1O0 Republican votes, then Cass 
township would have twice as many 
representative votes as Whiting. In 
voting at the primaries, the vote is 
made directly for the candidates; and 
if in Whiting township Brown should 
receive twenty-five votes fur sheriff 
and Smith fifty votes Eor sheriff out of 
a total of 75 votes, then Brown would 
receive twenty-five seventy-fifths, or 
one-third of the representative votes, 
and Smith would receive fifty seventy- 
fifths, or two-thirds of the representa- 
tive votes. And if Junes received 
forty-five votes for clerk, and Clark- 
received thirty votes fur tbe same of- 
fice, then Jones would receive forty- 
five seventy-fifths, ur three-fifths of 
the representative votes, and Clark 
would receive thirty seventy-fifths, ur 
two-fifths <>i lie' representative votes. 
The nominee having the largest rep- 
resentative VOte, and n ,,--anIy 



the largest popular vote, reoeh es the 
nomination When returns are made 
1 hej .He m. ui, ■ direct to the 1 
central committee, 

The great ad> antage in 1 In- system 
lies in the fact that the people vote 
directly fur the candidates, and iln, 
know exactly for whom they are vot- 
ing, ami consequently take great in- 
tei es i ui tlie primary elections. More- 
over, it has the essence of fairness, 
fur every candidate stands upon his 
own merit- before the members ol his 
party, and need nut have the backing 
of any influential person or corpora- 
tion. In other word-, it is a free for- 
all race. This system is very popular 
in Jackson County, where it is used, 
excepting with the professional politi- 
cians; and while no doubt il lias fea- 
tures that may be objectionable an I 
which might be improved, yet it is 
certainly based upon the right prin- 
ciple. 

Another system of the direct pri- 
mary is the one now in vogue in 
Grand Rapids, Michigan, Mere, two 
distinct elections are held. The names 
of all the candidates are placed on one 
ticket in alphabetical order and are 
voted on at the first election. The 
two receiving the greatest number of 
votes are placed upon a ticket and 
again voted on at the second election, 
and the one receiving the majority is 
declared the nominee. 

It would seem that the principal ob- 
jection to this plan would be the extra 
labor and expense necessary fur hold- 
ing the additional election, but the 
plan certainly possesses the merit of 
giving the voter a voice in choosing 
his party nominees. 

Whatever new system may be 
adopted, it seems to be certain that 
it must be some sort of direct pri- 
mary; for, as we have seen, il is prai 
tically impossible for one man ur one 
set of men faithfully and truly to 
represent their party in a precinct in 
every particular, or in the nominees 
for the various offices. The only way 
by which the individual membei 
the party may be insured a voice in 
the actual choice of nominees is by 
direct primary. The manner of carry- 
ing out and putting into practice this 
foundation principal is a matter of de- 
tail, which no doubt would require 
practical experience to perfect, 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Cutting Retort 

Y, mng Mother— I'm sorrj .Mr ["op 

flour, if baby's crying ryi ■ 

I le's been cutting his teel h 

Topfloor * '■ bachelor) — 

That's it! Tbe idea of letting a young 
child have a knife Iu play with.— 
I ;■ i, ,11 Transcript. 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



Uncle Ephraim Says 
By T. S. Murray 
De man whut introduced dis hea'h 
habit ob wurkin' 'tween meals mas' 
a bin hard up fur sumptin' ter do. 

Hit aint alius safe fur to jedge a 
man's biznes 'bility by his manners in 
de ball room, an' likewise hit am un- 
fair to jedge his religion, by de lang- 
wedge whut he uses when he am 
walkin' de flo' nights wid de baby. 



am a bad sign fur to put yer name on 
de promissory note of de man whut 
don't meet it when hit am due. 



De man whut say dat "chickens alius 
cum home ter roost" haint oberly 
quainted wid de karicter an' habits 
ob de Alabama nigger. 



Hit am bin brought forcibly to ma 
observashun data tween de people 
whut wants to get in de papers, an' 
kant, an' dem whut doan want to an' 
do, de po' newspaper man hab a hard 
time. 



Ef money am de root ob all evil, 
mos' ob my 'quaintences ought ter be 
saints. 



Hit aint cowardice dat makes a 
man keep de knowledge ob las' nights 
poker game frum his wife. Hit am 
jes a natural lub ob peace. 



Hit am sprisin' how much piety de 
aberage man take on wheneber dar am 
a good lookin' girl in de choir. 



De man whut am alius settin' roun' 
de lobby ob de big hotels 'plainin' 
bout de grub, am usually a man whut 
eat in de kitchin at home, an' aint 
lowed ter gib de cook any back talk. 



I aint a sayin' as how a lie an* 
scusable, but hit pears ter me dat 
when you am axed ter pass jedgment 
on. de looks ob de red faced fo' days' 
ol' baby ob yer niece, de lawd aint 
gwine ter spect any too much truf 
tellin'. 



All dis heah talk, bout de vanity ob 
wimen usually cum frum de male 
side ob de house, an' hits a hundred to 
one shot dat de phrase, "vanity, van- 
ity, thy name am wuman," was coined 
by a man whut parts his hair in de 
middle an' wears a Panama hat wid 
de brim turned down at de back. 



"Pretty is as pretty does" wuz a 
term invented by de ancients fur to 
describe soshul delinquencies whut 
(ley didn't dare call by name. 

De aberage politishun beleebs dat 
de office shud seek de man; but he 
also beleebs in keepiu' on de main 
streets an' in easy reach ob de tele- 
fone so dat if he am wanted he can be 
found widout much trubble. 



Ma breddern, hit don't alius pay fur 
to 'vidualize — you can call a man a 
bird, an' he am tickled to def; call 
him a jay an' dar's a hurry call fur de 
ambulance. 



Hit don't alius foller dat de man 
whut wait an hour an forty minutes 
fur his sweetheart ter put on her 
gloves, aint gwine ter kick like a bay 
steer ef his wife aint got supper on 
d<e table de minute he git home frum 
wurk. 



iDar was wunst a man whut set 
aroun' all de time in a bath tub, a 
sunnin' hisself, an' de people wuz as- 
tonished, an' while de reports don't 
say jes whar dis wuz, de las' clause 
make hit safe to say dat hit didn't 
happen in San Francisco. 



Hit am said dat a good name am 
mo' to be preferred dan great riches, 
but de trubble am in gittin' de aber- 
age man to beleebe hit. 



T haint nachuraly superstishus, but 
I'ze foun' frum sad experience dat hit 



De wuman whut does de mos' 
talkin' bout wuman's rights an' de 
equality wid man, am de wun whut 
sets up de loudest howl if she am 
axed to shovel de snow off de side- 
walk or heave de coal in de cellar. 

Opportunity knocks wunst upon 
ebery man's do', but I notices dat de 
man whut cheebes de mos' success in 
life, am de wun whut, don't wait fur 
opportunity ter knock but hikes up to 
de cross roads fur to meet hit. 

* + + 

Barrier to Diamond Making 

Diamonds are the only gems con- 
sisting of one and but one element. 
This apparent simplicity has not only 
attracted artificial production but has 
also been the insuperable barrier 
which has hindered success. Artifi- 
cial diamonds certainly have been 
made, but on such a small scale that 
they have been practically useless. 

By the term artificial is not meant 
glass or paste imitations, but the real 
substance, so made by chemical art 
that the product is the same in every 
respect as that made by nature. Dif- 
ferent workers have employed dif- 
ferent methods and with varying suc- 
cess. 

In 1853 the method of Despretz 
consisted of depositing carbon by the 
disruptive action of the electric spark 
in a large vacuum tube. The carbon 
was deposited on platinum wires and 
the deposit when viewed under the 
microscope had certain remarkable 
features. 

At the ends of the wires some points 
were seen which experts pronounced 
to be octahedral crystals, the form in 
which nature gives us the diamond. 
In color they were black and white. 
Tested upon hard stones the sub- 
stance polished a ruby. As diamond 
is the only substance that polishes 
ruby the deposit was pronounced to 
be the powder of the diamond. 

Next came a diamond made by dis- 
solving carbon in. liquid. Sugar or 
salt dissolved in liquid leaves the crys- 
tos of sugar or salt behind when the 



liquid has evaporated. Similarly if we 
could dissolve carbon either as char- 
coal or lampblack and by the evap- 
oration of the liquid allow the dis- 
solved carbon to separate out it would 
probably crystallize into the lustrous 
form of a diamond. 



Numerious experiments produced a 
crystalline mass, diamond, but in the 
form of sand. Sir Andrew Noble has 
secured a temperature of 5,200 degrees 
centigrade. The temperature meited 
carbon. On analyzing the carbon 
minute diamonds were found in it. 




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PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



China's Self-willed Ctrl* 

ii the 

Rucnci 

other -ally. 

n firsl 

Id rule Chinese tfiri- 
'icir own . 

im will 

lime immemorial, but its 

;. for the 

China are declaring 

he final word. 

ting upon that 

widespread has this new inde- 
pendence become that those who have 

• 1 it have been called a 
and described as "Tz Yau Noi" 
willed daughters). The conservatives 

ina frown upon the disobedient 
who have been edu- 

iii Western schools and colleges 

viewed the logic of the new 
movement with impartiality. Many nf 
them indeed have nol only permitted 

dvised their daughters to be 
"tz yau." 

Those who cling to the old custom 
denounce the new practice as corrupt. 
They hold that boys and girl- in the 

n of their youth cannot possibly 
make a good choice, and point to the 
unhappiness of European and Ameri- 
can marriages as warning examples. 

Those foreigners who are unac- 
quainted with Chinese home life may 
believe these statements and say that 
the arguments are sound, but the un- 
happiness of many Chinese matches is 
indicated by this from a Hongkong 
newspaper: 

The young husband gets a wife, not 
of his choice, but of his parents'; af- 

tirne he gets tired of her. and, if 
he has means, sails forth into the sea 
of libertinism, bunting for another 
wife, or concubine, while his wife 
away al home; and if she ts 
blessed with offspring, a weakly being 
is launched into the world, who in 
later years will turn to opium as » 
panacea for assuaging his bodily and 
mental pains. The women, on the 
other side, curse their fate and blame 
Heaven for allowing them to be ever 
1. 1. in and united to such husbands; 
the more .sensitive among Ilium find 
relief in suicide. 

The writer of the above asks how 
the reformation of China can be ex- 
pected "if tin- germ of conservatism 
l- not destroyed, and if her people arc 
in perpetual wars in their own family 
circles. "We cannot." be says, "expect 
her to ameliorate her form of govern- 
ment until the governors arc better in 
their propensities; ami ibis only can 
lie brought ah. nit by their family 
broils living lessened If China's sons 
and daughters are allowed to make 
their own choice they will, if unhappy, 
suffer it with another suit of resigna- 
tion, and if they arc nf the official 
class they will turn to some form of 



.re it will 
em." 

r his position the « 

ins: "The 
ll . if they v. 
well tl aland their 

familii 

+ + + 

Method in His Madness 
Apparently the deed was committea 

neither in si in anger Calm- 

ly, deliberately, ihe man walked out 
to the curb and slammed an empty 
down on ' pat cm, nl 

The impact shivered it into atoms 
Ail idler nearby squealed in asto 
ment. 

"Great heavens, what are you do- 
ing?" she asked. "Are you crazy?" 

"X"t by a long shot," -aid the man, 
"or. if I am, there is method in my 
madness, 1 am going to get this 
street swept. It hasn't come in con- 
tact with i broom fur a week. Every 
variety of refuse has accumulated 
here except glass. Well. I've added 
the glass. That will bring the street 
sweeper. I'll hustle around now to 
the nearest Inspector ami tell him 
about this glass. That is one thing 
that no Inspector or sweeper can af- 
ford to lei lie around, on account of 
the dancer to man, beast, and general 
traffic. When I get back I shall not 
be at all surprised to find a sweeper 
here." 

Inspired by curiosity, the idler 
waited fur the final chapter of the 
bottle smashing episode. The man's 
prophecy was very nearly fulfilled. 
The sweeper did not arrive ahead of 
him, but he came ten minutes after. 
— New York Times. 

* ♦ + 
How to Open a New Booh 

Hold the book with its back on a 
smooth or covered table; let the front 
board down, then the other, holding 
the leaves in one hand while you open 
a few leaves at the back, then a few 
at the front, and so go on, alternately 
opening- back and front, gently press- 
ing open the sections till you reach 
the center of the volume. Do this 
two or three times, and you will ob- 
tain the best results. Open the vol- 
ume violently and carelessly in any 
one place, and you will likely break 
the back, and cause a start in the 
leaves. 

Never force the back. If it does not 
yield to opening gently, rely upon it 
the back is too tightly or strongly 
lined. 

A connoisseur, many years ago. an 
excellent customer of mine, says Wil- 
liam Matthews in "Modem Book- 
binding Practically Considered", who 
thought he knew perfectly how to 
handle books, came into my office 
when I had an expensive binding just 
brought from the bindery, ready to be 
sent home; he, before my eyes, took 
hold of the volume, and. tightly hold- 
ing the leaves in each hand, instead of 
allowing them free play. violently 
opened il in the center and exclaimed, 
"flow beautifully your bindings 
,,pcn'" I almost fainted. He had 
broken the back of the volume, and it 
had to be rebound. 



A Delicnte Dismissal 

of Lieut. 

I.ahni. tlu champion balloonist, had 
.. twenty-minute ~.iil in Wilbur 
Wright's aeroplane at l.e Mans last 
month, In Paris, afterward, he talked 

'linn. 

"The sensation aid, 

"i- like lli Swifl 

steamer, without an> ■ M roll- 

sea perfectly smooth, 

"1 was lui p, Mr, Wrighl 

has hundreds of applications 

ll, has i" refuse ninety nine 



put delicately. Thej licate 

il ol 

bis wit 

lady bad been visit 

man'- house steadily foi 

iii. uuli- i iii toward 
she said I., him: 
" 'John, [an < niy 

ci i : i 

OU "'I Minnie What dre 
i me in?' 

" 'Yi cm' traveling gi >v\ n, dear mother,' 

-. >ll in-law replied," 



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Single Management but Separate in Location 



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137 West Adams Street 

Telephone Home 21203 

A splendid home for boys and 
also a well regulated school- 
home where the character train- 
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way he should go; and when 
he is old he will not depart from 
it," is exemplified at this school. 
Boys here are taught manliness, 
obedience, punctuality, industry 
and learning in a way fitting 
them suitably as foundation 
stones for life's progress- Boys 
of any age after 5- years ad- 
mitted. Each boy is held to be 
an individual. Not being held 
back by class restrictions his 
progress is rapid and certain. 
Boys in addition to the regular 
school studies of our girls 
school are taught sloyd, mili- 
tary drill, vocal and instrumen- 
tal music, also the languages. 
The military department is in 
charge of Captain Robert A. 
Gibbs. 

. The school has athletic field 
where boys are taught sports 
and military drill. 

William Himrod, graduate of 
Pomona College and Champion 
mile runner of Pacific coast, is 
in charge of boys' play and 
athletics. 



FOR GIRLS 

243 West Adams Street 

Home Phone 21202 
Snnset South 3539 

Located like boys' school in one 
of most aristocratic residence 
sections of Los Angeles. The 
buildings are well adapted to a 
girls' school; wide verandas, 
upper balconies and beautiful 
grounds, set out to semi-tropical 
shrubbery. Miss Emma E. Page 
and Miss Delia M. Page, prin- 
cipals of these schools, are from 
Hiram College, Ohio, and both 
are Normal graduates. Miss 
Clara J. Armstrong, principal of 
the high school department, is 
a graduate of Oswego State 
Normal School, New York, a 
teacher whose exceptional abil- 
ity and experience along general 
educational lines is well known 
and established. 

Girls' here are taught vocal 
and instrumental music, drawing 
and painting, physical culture, 
elocution; these in addition to 
regular school studies. 

Ample facilities, are afforded 
for recreation and the girls' 
home training and moral wel- 
fare is attended to in a manner 
to bring out the sweet and beau- 
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true womanhood. 



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10 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



AMUSEMENTS 



Fun at the Majestic 

Murray and Mack are, at the Majes- 
tic this week, and by the way, if you 
are seeking solid comfort, try a seat 
in this theater. They are presenting 
the second edition of their musical 
foolery, "The Sunny Side of Broad- 
way," which is full of nonsense and 
merriment, though it drags a lot at 
first, before the explosion in the su'v 
way which brings on the two come- 
dians. The little fat man with a funny 
hat, elastic eyebrows, semi-circular 
auburn whiskers, an engaging smile, 
and a craving for fricaseed prunes, 
is Ollie- Mack, who plays Hennesy 
O'Brien, the hod carrier. Murray is 
his friend Michael O'Toole, a brick- 
layer, who "would rather be a billy- 
goat on Broadway than a race-horse 
on a blue-grass farm." The other 
people in the csst don't matter — 
though they all work hard to keep 
things moving. The lyrics, by Boyle 
Woolfolk, have singable qualities; but 
there's only one man in the company 
who can sing. It is no longer con- 




Corinnb at the Majestic 

sidered good form to employ singers 
in musical comedies. The energetic 
dancing pippins dance very badly in- 
deed, and all the girls are condemned 
to wear in rapid succession various 
unbecoming costumes; they do it 
cheerfully, too. The star comic danc- 
ers are the amazingly expressive legs 
of the dancing horse — the Wentz 
twin brothers, who also do a clever 
clog dance. M ; any original devices 
are introduced to produce startling 
scenic effects, one of the most suc- 
cessful being the boating illusion in 
the motor-boat song. 'With a few 
pretty girls in pretty gowns, and some 
people who could sing and dance su- 
perlatively well Murray and Mack- 
would have a very good show. 

"The Lion and the Mouse" 

This play has been so widely pre- 
sented over the country that it is 
familiar to many playgoers. It tack- 
les modern moral issues in a fair- 
minded spirit and demonstrates in a 
must telling fashion that money alone 
is impotent to secure happiness and 



that the pursuit of it fails to bring 
that power over the destinies of men 
which money grabbers arc supposed 
to desire. 

Paul Everton filled the role of John 
Burkett Ryder with skill and convinc- 
ing art. He was well sustained by 
Miss Crawford as Shirley Rossmorc. 
The play is by Charles Klein, the 
author of "The Third Degree." The 
hold which it has gained in public 
favor is well deserved. After seeing 
the play one comes away from the 
theatre with a sense of having gained 
something and not with the feeling of 
vapidness which only too often fol- 
lows attendance on histrionic shows. 
This production from long practice 
runs smoothly and the supporting 
company leaves little to complain of, 
each member in the cast doing well 
and helping to make a compound of 
excellent ability. 



Sothern's Visit 

The company which .Mr. Sothern 
brought with him was as good as 
most stars deem necessary to their 
comfort. Hamlet was a beautiful pro- 
duction. Hamlet's father's ghost was 
the most complaisant and unctions 
creature imaginable. Ophelia was a 
little heavy at times and the queen 
wept effectively in her bed cham- 
ber. Sothern's Hamlet recalled 
Booth, although his interpretation was 
less psychological and more emotional 
perhaps. The flaw in his performance 
was an indistinct enunciation. Tiie 
final stage picture was very beauti- 
ful. 

Why Mr. Sothern should have en- 
trusted his talents to the mediocrity 
of such a play as "Richard Lovelace" 
is hard to discover. The thing was 
quite meaningless and drowsy for sev- 
eral bad quarters of the hour. The 
lapse of nine years between the second 
and third acts made a rift in the con- 
tinuity of the play which no art could 
overcome. Mr. Sothern's acting in 
the title role seemed quite uninten- 
tional, and devoid of magnetism. 



Simmering Sentiment 

"Heartsease" is a play which one 
may see once with pleasure but it is 
so full of a cloying sentimentality 
that a second view of it destroys what- 
ever favorable impressions may have 
been made 'by it in the past. It de- 
mands for effective treatment a poetic 
temper which the Belasco company 
failed to impart to the lines this week. 
Even the work of Mr. Stone seemed 
forced and mechanical. The actors 
seemed to have jumped into their 
clothes, rather than to have arrayed 
themselves in the graces of ancient 
furbelows. Their togs were apparent- 
ly disquieting. The company acted 
as individuals rather than as a whole, 
which produced, as always, disjointed 
scenes. Ben Graham did as well as 
any of the company as the irate 
father. The first act of the play i; 
slightly explanatory. The real inter- 
est of the piece does not come until 
the third act. In this the manage- 
ment of the music might have been 
better if the strains of Temple's opera 
had only been heard when the doors 



of the theatre were opened, ceasing 
to be heard when they were shut. 
Furthermore, Temple's attention to the 
music came when the melody was per- 
ishing. The disappointment in the 
play probably comes from the fact 
that sentimentality, being artificial, re- 
quires more practice than natural vir- 
tues, which explains why the Belasco 
company could not, l.ii a week's no- 
tice, reduce their art to the flimsy pro- 
portions of "Heartsease." 



Chatterbox Tragedy 

"Sporting Life" at the Burbank this 
week is a comedy of horrors cheer- 
fully dispersed through five acts. At 
no time is it very clear what the 
pother is all about, except when Olive 
de Cartaret is murdered. There is a 
great deal of coming and going of 
persons and as the actors themselves 
seem to enjoy the situations one is 
in constant expectation that some- 
thing intelligible is about to transpire. 
There is apparently no relation be- 
tween the first act and the last. They 
just happen. But the curious part of 
the performance is that one is amus- 
ed in spite of this utter lack of art 
in the construction of the play. On 




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11 



r the 
much fun 

ts the 

Miss Hall ilid well 
in the scene whi in the 

lively 

hich »< have seen her. The play 
humor and m.i 

: lem- 

tbridgc 
r furnished a bit of 
-In and merry. 

At the Msscn 

ion, dramatic in 
linn and vitally inter 

is claimed for "The Wolf," 
which will be presented al the Mason 

House next week, h is 
that Eugene Walter has written tin- 
play i style. It is a sto 
that wonderful Bay country, 
and of the primal eternal struggli 
between men for tin in of a 
woman. Dark p pure sen 
timenl are set'in opposition, but there 
is nothing hackneyed. 

The lather of Hilda is a Scotchman 
whose narrowness of mind drives hi- 
wife into ili leaving the child 

behind. Then .McDonald, a handsome 
young American engineer, offer, to 
simple girl and engage- thi 
a plot to lure Hilda the 
way her m gone. McDon- 

ald is not the conventional villain, 
however, and deeds of violence he 
to tin hero, which i.- certainlj 
contrary to all old traditions. There 
crops up Jules Beaubien, a French 
Canadian with a streak of Ojibway 
from his mother. McDonald had left 
Jules' sister to die with her unborn 
child. Jules recognizes him and bides 
his time. Baptiste, his loyal retainer. 
i - himself gently as he swear, 
that null-- Jules kill- McDonald, he 
will. 

Corinne 
Corinne in a new musical play, 
"Lola from Berlin," by John J. Mc- 
Nally, come- to the Majestic Theatre 
for one week, starting with a matinee 
Sunday. She is sure of a hearty wel- 
come as her last appearance lure in 
■ M Cohan's "Forfy-five M in 
ute- from Broadway" was considered 
one of the treats of the season, "Lo- 
la from Berlin" will en, Corinne a 
character part, a serio-comic role, for 
"bile it is a musical play, it tells 
a consistent story, in which the char- 
acter- actually do somel bin- I ola 
i-. of course, the pivot of the play, 
She i- a little girl who comes to New 
York in response i" an advertisement 
inserted in a German paper in which 
an beir lo a large fortune in America 
i- sought She lands in America and 

seek, out the lawyer who has the >'- 

tate in charge, only to in- mistaken For 
rvant for whom his wife had hap 



•taken identit) i- but 

"p, il -tart. 

I.i. unable to understand 

..ire. 

"Charley's Aunt" Coming 

a pi. i\ which i- 

well known in every latitude where 

- known well enough 

to produce laughter It i- a 

which never fails i,, induce merriment 



nn\ .oman brook There 
suredl \„„i 

and in it Richard Vivian who 
ifore displayed hi. genius 

as a rarely able comedian, 

will impersonate the old lady from 

Brazil Howard Scott, after bi 

absent from the local stage for some 

week on aCCOUnl of illness, will re 

sume hi. -i ] as \\, Spi I 

tigue will contributi oni ol hi- most 

adroit stage caricature- to lb, 



At the Burbank 




Hilda and Jrr.ES Reaubien in "Thb Wolf" 



in the most crabbed of spectators, 

The story of the young college fel- 
low who don- feminine attire and 
passes himself off for "Charley's 
Aunt, from Brazil, w here the nuts come 
from," and who succeeds in mixing 
Up e\ erj thing in such a manner a- to 
provoke all sorts of ridiculous scenes 
and situations has never been sur- 
passed. Farces come and farce- go 
and most of them are heralded 15 
being as good as "Charley's Aunt" 



formance. 'Chariey> Aunt in the 
hands of the Belasco company ought 
to lie the big laughing success of the 
seasi hi. 

Manager Blackwood of the Belasco 
theater has contracted with tlu- Ath- 
letic Association of St. Vincent's Col- 
lege lor a series of "Tuesday college 
nights." The first of these gatherings 
is scheduled for Tuesday night when 
"Charley's Aunt" will delight the St 

Vincent students and their friends. 



enderlj pathetic 
love tragedj 
will be pre-, nted al the Burbank 

lr < li: week beginning with 

:i '"■'"■ il lay. l.ike 

"Madame llutt, i : 

i's motivi I panese girl 

for an American in thi- ca 
la girl foi i .... , 
: ''d lo the American i m 
Mr. Baker, who is now dra 
matic editor of the San Francisco 

Chronicle, was bom in Japan and 

lived there many years. I te is recog- 
nized as a leading authority in this 
country on Japanese affair- ami i 
regulat lecturer in Stanford and ol hei 
universities on Japanese subject i 
"The Heart of a Geisha" be ha- drawn 
aside the curtain of romance shield- 
ing I he geisha girl- from occidental 
observation and has disclosed the hid- 
eous reality of the bondage which en- 
slaves thousands of dainty little sing- 
ers, dancers and entertainer- of Nip- 
pon. 

* * * 

MUSIC 

The Symphony Concert 

Tschaikowsky's Symphonic" Pathcli- 
qtte, Op. 74, dominated the program of 
the third concert of the Lo- Angeles 
Symphony Orchestra on the 18th hist., 
being, [ believe, the third time they 
have produced this work, consequent-, 
Iy attaining somewhat better results 
with it than has been the case with 
some other attempts o n equally ambi- 
tious lines. Mr. Hamilton deserves 
credit for his excellent reading of a 
difficult score. 

ft is epoch making in structure and 
1 doubt if any composer of the sym 
phony since Beethoven has filled his 
score with such a wealth of noble 
melodies. The opening adagio with 
its swaying, entrancing melodiousness 
keys ones interest up for what is 10 
follow. The strings did good work 
here. But why cannot Mr. Hamil- 
ton's brasses carry a sustained note 
pianissimo without wobbling and 
sputtering along in anxious uncertain- 
ty? The andante completing the first 
movement was admirably played. He 
must indeed be a hardened sinner who 
does not feel sttch music. In the 
allegro con grazia following, one 
missed the essentially Slavic qualities 
belonging to it, in the all too lame 
interpretation. But why expect the 
impossible? The last movement musr 
be heard more than once to even be- 
gin to appreciate its lofty and almosl 
classical mien. It is unquestionably 
. the most inspired if not the greatest 
thing Tschaikowsky ever wrote and 
it seems almost fitting he should have 
died but a short time afterward. 

Fantasie Dialogue, by Boellraan, for 
organ and orchestra began the si 
half of the program. Mr. Sessions at 
the organ. I li- encore, Vdi ira I ion by 
Guilmant, was more pleasing, though 
the motor was very audible and 
Me throughout both j 
The Suite all 'Antica by Luci 
was pleasingly orchestrated hut al- 
mosl i ■ • • > "sweet" and lacked 
trasts. 



12 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



Ouverture Corsair, Op. 21, by Hec- 
tor Berlioz, completed the program. 
It is a "tone poem" rich in color. 
The first subject is particularly inter- 
esting and reminds one irresistably of 
parts of Lohengrin, though, as it de- 
velops into a more lively and boister- 
ous mood, the illusion is gradually 
dispelled, working up to a brilliant 
climax at the close, very complex in 
orchestration and thoroughly typical 
of Berlioz. T. C. 



LITERARY NOTES 



Gadski Concert 
What a great artist Mme. G;idski 
is in every sense of the word. She 
has a warmth of tone which reaches 
one's very inner soul. The brilliant 
and appreciative audience at last Tues- 
day evening's- concert greeted her 
most enthusiastically. Her charming 
manner won the hearts of all present. 
Her wonderful interpretation, al- 
though strictly individual where she 
can use her own individuality, always 
remain within the bounds of the com- 
poser's ideas. For instance in the 
two arias, Elsa's Dream and Dich 
Theure Halle, she brings out Wag- 
ner's wonderful power as compara- 
tively few singers have succeeded in 
doing. Schubert's Die Junge Nonne 
headed the second part of the pro- 
gram, followed by Brahms, Grieg, La 
Forge and Strauss compositions. This 
group as well as the group on the 
first part of the 'program, which was 
also selected with great taste, was 
sung delightfully. Mme. Gadski 
showed her temperament in each in- 
dividual selection. Her encores were 
graciously and generously rendered. 
Now a few words about Mgr. La 
Forge. I think him a beautiful com- 
poser who may well be numbered 
among the best of writers of the pres- 
ent time. As a soloist he is very 
good. His renditions are very clear 
and musicianly. As an accompanist 
he is unsurpassed. 

NATALIE. 



Verdi and Rossinni 
Mrs. Nanno Wood- will give a talk 
on Italian opera at Symphony Hall 
on Monday next. She will treat of 
the birth and development of opera 
in Italy and devote the latter part of 
the afternoon to Verdi and Rossinni. 
Mme. Johnstone-Bishop and Mr. Zink 
will sing during the afternoon. 



Rag Time Contest 

It is surprising to know of the keen 
interest and rivalry that is being 
worked up over the rag time contest 
to take place at Simpson Auditorium, 
Jan.. 21, between Mr. Phil Stebbins, 
who is considered the best all around 
vaudeville pianist, and Mr. Edward 
Barnes, present champion of the world 
for rag time 'playing. 

Rag time music with its swing and 
syncopated time holds a place in the 
hearts of the public similar to colored 
minstrels, — everyone once in a while 
likes to hear it. At this contest on the 
21st besides the regular rag time pro- 
gram, there will be buck and wing 
dancing, and Messrs. Barnes and Steb- 
bins would like it understood that in 
contesting for this purse, they are 
willing to allow others to enter. 



By Perez Field 

Romney shows us how lovely was 
Jane, the Duchess of Gordon. When 
a little girl, as Jenny Maxwell, she 
used to ride wandering pigs in hoyden 
fashion in the streets of Edinburgh. 
She was a startling little creature who 
grew up to be one of the cleverest 
women of her day. She and her hus- 
band were ill matched and her happi- 
ness was found to a great extent in 
political power. 

Harry Graham says of her in "A 
Group of Scottish, W/omen" (Duf- 
field): 

The secret of the duchess's great 
success lay not so much in her wit and 
beauty — "she is beautiful, indeed," 
wrote Mrs. Delany, "very natural and 
good humor, but her very broad 
Scotch accent does not seem to 
belong to the very great delicacy of 
her apppearance" — as in her determi- 
nation to succeed at all hazards. "Any 
contest I shall rise in — never fall, I 
assure you," she once wrote of Fran- 
ces Farquharson, an intimate friend 
and adviser of the Gordon family; 
and from this sentence one can gain 
the key to her whole character. She 
was determined, masterful, undaunted. 
"I have been acquainted with David 
Hume and William Pitt," she used to 
say, "and therefore I am not afraid 
to converse with anybody," and con- 
verse she did, freely and fluently, 
though not always in a language that 
was understood by her listeners. 
"Rax me a spaul o' that bubbly jock," 
she once observed at a dinner to a 
rlustrated- Englishman who was crav- 
ing a turkey and at the same time 
boasting somewhat prematurely of his 
intimate knowledge of the Scottish 
vernacular. 

Her ienergy and vitality were a 
source of constant wonder to her 
friends. Horace Walpole gives in one 
of his letters a description of her daily 
life, and relates how she "first went 
to Handel's music in the Abbey; she 
then clambered over the benches and 
went to Hasting's trial in the Hall; 
after dinner to the 'play; then to Lady 
Lucan's assembly; after that to Rane- 
lagh, and returned to Mrs. Hobart's 
faro table; gave a ball herself in the 
evening of that morning, into which 
she must have got a good way; and set 
out for Scotland the next day." Her- 
cules himself, as Walpole remarks, 
ci uld not in the same time have 
achieved a quarter of her labors. 



A faithful satirist writing for The 
Author says that after reading many 
manuscripts, "I have been constantly 
impressed by the weakness in the 
drawing of the central male or fe- 
male character, even where consider- 
able power of observation has 'been 
characters of the same sex. When 
the man writer comes to his heroine, 
or the woman to her hero, failure is 
manifest." 

Why a man's heroine is wont to 
be a flimsy creature he does not at- 
tempt ,to explain. But on women's 
men in novels he casts some reflec- 



tions which are neither flattering to 
fact nor to fancy. 

Superficially, he thinks, women's he- 
roes may be divided into two classes, 
whom we may call John and Jack. 

John is a strong man who suffers 
in silence, although he may occasion- 
ally "bow his head in grief." Usually 
he has a plain, honest face, and is 
carelessly dressed. If he smokes any- 
thing it is a pipe. He is rather stupid, 
and his wits in any case are not as 
quick as the heroine's, in consonance 
with the agreeable fiction about 
woman's livelier intelligence. He is 
always a prig, according to male ideas. 
Jack is not so strong as John. He 
may even have had a past, though not 
very black. Pie probably smokes 
cigarettes. He differs greatly from 
John in having a clear-cut face and 
wearing "immaculate clothes." . . . 
Jack is not so faithful nor so quixotic 
as John, but he turns out right in the 
end. On the way to it, he is quite as 
much of a prig. 

Let us look well into our hearts 
Are men after all essentially priggish? 
Is the normal and necessary, if not 
well founded, conceit of the male 
founded, after all, on second rate vir- 
tue, wisdom and learning? 



I GROW HAIR 



In the course of a sermon by Prof. 
J. P. Mahaffy, who is delivering the 
Lowell Lectures this year, the speaker 
said: 

"The Apostles, my brethren, were 
persons of little education, and, with a 
few exceptions, of no culture. In 
these days they would not have been 
admitted into good society, and their 
manners were, no doubt, very distress- 
ing. They were not, in fact, gentle- 
men." 

The preacher had paused for a mo- 
ment! then he added. "That, my 
brethren, is a signal proof of the divine 
inspiration of these unlettered men." 
The dons looked at one another in 
amazement, for that kind of proof of 
divine inspiration had never occurred 
to them. 



In speaking of the charms which 
the desert has for genius the Saturday 
Review calls attention to a book on 
the exploration of Arabia by Mr. Ho- 
garth wherein he "has pointed out 
the exceptional intellectual ability of 
desert explorers as a class, that they 
are of something more than ordinary 
originality and genius. The names of 
Doughty, Burton, Palgrave, Burck- 
hardt and Blunt occur in confirma- 
tion; and the same holds good of the 
Sahara, which has been reconnoitred 
by a body of men not only of adven- 
turous character but of unusual force 
of mind and keen witted above the 
average. It seems the desert pos- 
sesses a fascination for minds of this 
original cast, and not a fugitive fas- 
ination either, for most of them have 
returned to their work of exploration 
again and again, finding it seemingly 
impossible to resist the mysterious 
charm which these wastes of sand and 
barren steppes exercise over them. 
It is strange! What can be the secret 
of such a charm? What do they come 
out to see? 




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Baldness and Premature Grayness, 
Grow Ladies' and iCnildren's hair 
rapidly, soft, glossy and BEAUTI- 
FUL. 

I Take No Doubtful Cases, and 
positively and permanently cure all 
I do take. 

I Furnish Out of Town people 
home treatment. (Write today) 
stamp for Question Blank and par- 
ticulars. 

I Will Forfeit $500 for a Scalp 
Disease or a BALD HEAD I can- 
not cure, providing the Scalp still 
shows fine Hair to prove the Roots 
or Capillary Glands are not dead. 

PROF. GEO. A. GARLOW 

The Wo.rld's most celebrated and 

only successful Specialist on 

Hair and Scalp Diseases 

Consultation FREE 

Office Hours 8 a. m. to 5 p. m. 

425-6 Citizens' National Bank Bldg. 

Corner Third and Main Sts., 

Los Angeles, Cal. 



rri T T FQ Domestic and 
X A X-t S2d O Imported 

For Mantels and Floors 
Marble and Stone 

Pacific Tile and Mantel Co. 

Agents for Graeby and Rookulood Tilts 
716-18 South Spring Street 



Manhattan Press Clipping Bureau 

503 Cambridge Building, 

Cor. Fifth Ave. & 33d St., 

New York City 

Gives the best service of Press 
Clippings on any subject of in- 
terest from all papers and periodi- 
cals published here and abroad. 
Our readers gather for you more 
valuable material than you could 
get ordinarily in a lifetime. Our 
service is the neatest and most 
thoroughly done. Scrap-books of 
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reference and your library. Send 
your order on the subjects of in- 
terest and receive our up-to-date 
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TERMS: 

100 Clippings $ 5-00 

250 12.00 

500 " 20.00 

1,000 " 35-00 

5,000 " 150.00 

10,000 " 280.00 



Good Things to Eat 

Just a Little Better than Mother 

Ever Made 

Home Canned Frwts 

Put up by J. E. Taylor & Co., 
Santa Ana, Cal. 

We sell direct to the consumer. 

ROBERT MADISON 
Sole Agent for Los Angeles County 

Phone F1552, 715 S. Grand Ave. 






PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



in, but 
i til fir 

-lit." 



ek in 

ublishcd in Phila- 

n.l i- entitled "Thom- 

raphy: Publicly 

•ii for nearly half a 

v. with his latest improvements, 

ne of the earliest and 
bject pub- 
Vmerica. The author says 
in his preface that George Washing- 
ton « iginal subscriber i" the 
work. 



J. ] ts on 

Miniatures" contains much that 
al reader a'" 
well as to the collector. Here, for 
instance, is an anecdote worth re] 

inn: 

ie year- ago the father of t lie 
present Duke of Buccleuch took to 
collecting miniatures, and the agi nl 

lie employed to purchase them was 
the late Mr. Dominic 'Colnaghi. into 
whose shop there walked one day a 
man who said he had some little pic- 
to sell that he had bought with 
a "job lot" of old silver and gold 
from a working jeweller. These "lit- 
tle picture-" proved to be no less * 
prize than a number of miniatures 
formerly in the collection of Charles 
1. which, as we know, was dispersed 
at the time of the Commonwealth. 
In the days of the King's prosperity 
had been catalogued and de- 
scribed by the royal librarian. the 
conscientious 'Dutchman, Van der 
Doort, and these miniatures bore on 
their back a crown and the royal 

er, the entwined C's. Now, after 
all their vicissitudes, these priceless 
historical miniatures rest in Montague 

se, Whitehall, barely a stone's 
throw frmn the window in the ban- 
queting hall of the palace whence 
their n.yal one-time owner stepped 
forth upon the scaffold on that bitter 
winter morning of January 30. 1649. 



New Books at the Public Library 
*Law: Its Origin, Growth and Func- 
tion, by James Coolidge Carter (I'nl 
nams. 1907 — No. 340:24). i- a contribu- 
tion to the discussion of the founda- 
tions of our law. The author opposed 
iDavid Dudley Field in hi- attempt to 
codify the laws for New York and 'at 
thai time began his inquiries into the 
difference between the written and the 
unwritten law. This course of lec- 
tures was prepared for delivery al 
Harvard University in 1905, but ow- 
ing to tlie writer's death in February 
of thai year this purpose was never 
fulfilled. 
Aaron Burr, by Alfred Henry Lewis 



■ Hubbard 

his English " Tin 
i- put tin ■ in the form 

ry and horridly sketches 

in Weimar and else 
when 

•Rambling Recollections, by Sir 
Henry Driimmond Wolff (Macmillan, 
>23 422 W85), form- two 
v.. Inn i 1 ami inn 

relating to a lieftime full 
-ode anil interest. As an example of 
how every one i- inclined to lo 
thing:, -imply from his own point of 

lie relates the following 
"In a town where 1 was at school i 
new clergyman had just arrived. The 
hairdresser came on a certain day to 
cut the boy-' hair, ami was asked what 
I'.e thought of the vicar. His only re- 
ply was. 'Very i r bead of hair, 

-ir.' " 

Modern India, by Win Eleroy Cur- 
tis i Rev II, [90S— No. 915-4:56), is a 
closely printed volume of five hun- 
dred rather complacent pages, but not 
-- interesting for all that, as it 
would be almost impossible to write 
ab< an I ndia and be quite dull. 

♦Memoirs of Monsieur Claude trans- 
lated from the French by Katberinc 
Prescott Wormley (Houghton, 1907 — 
No. 923-44:C61). The original work 
i- in ten volumes, the first five of 
which have been condensed into this 
translation. Monsieur Claude was 
chief of police under the second Em- 
pire. This volume brings the story 
of his connection with public affairs 
down to the end of the Empire. 

The History of Over Sea, done into 
English by William Morris (Russell, 
X. Y., 1902— No. 821-89:M877-12), is 
an ancient French tale put into pic- 
turesque form by a modern lover of 
craftsmanship. 

Our list ends this week with a vol- 
ume of poems by Stephen Phillips 
called New Poems (John Lane, 1907 — 
No. 821-89:P54-8) Phillips is the au- 
thor of one or two plays which have 
been put upon the stage. "Herod" is 
one and another work is called 
"Nero". This volume contains a 
short tragedy in one act called "Iole". 

+ + <• 
FORTHCOMING EVENTS 

(Jan. 16 to Jan. 23) 
Theatres Next Week 

Auditorium — "Cinderella". 
Belasco — "Charley's Aunt". 
Burbank — "The Heart of a Geisha". 
Grand — "The Tenderfoot". 
Majestic — "Lola from Berlin". 
.Mason— "The Wolf". 

Art Exhibitions 
Wednesday, Thursday and Saturday 
at 403 Blanchard Building, work by 
the pupils of Miss Lillian Drain. 

Meetings and Lectures 
Today (Saturday, Jan. 16.) — City 

Club, Hotel Westminster: "Different 

Phases of Charter Amendment"; 

Charles F. Lummis, Capt. A. A. Fries 

and W. J. Hunsaker. 

Sunday, Jan. 17. — Symphony Hall. 

Opera Recitals, "Die Meistcrsinger". 

B. G. Kingsley. 8 p. m. 

Monday, Jan. 18. — Merchants and 



Mannf.'ictii' n. annual 

election ol u. to 

4 p. in. Wilcox Building. M and M 
Association dinner at Levy- Ri 

t (i p. in Addresses: "Busini -- 
Unity", Frank i .. T> rrell, 1 sq . 
"Banking in Lo- Vngeles", J, M. El- 
liott, Esq.; "Lo- Vngeles a- I have 

Known Her for Twenty live Near-". 
J. Dennis, Esq.; "Facts and 
Comments", Geo. W. Burton, 
"Advertising", II. W. Frank, I 
Ebell Club, musicalc: Cantata "The 

Raven". 2:3(1 p. m. Symphony Hall. 
p. in., "An Afternoon with Italian 

Opera", a talk by Mrs, Nanno U la 

assisted bj Mme. Johnstone-Bishop 
and ]' ihann 1 la.d Zinck, 

Board of Supervisors meet at 9:30 

a ill 

Board of Public Works, 9 a. m. 

Finance Committee, 1(1 a. m. 

Water Commission, 3:30 p. m. 

Annual meeting of Humane Society. 
Pasadena. 

Tuesday, Jan. 19. — Friday Morning 
Club, "The Lady From the Sea", 
read by Mrs. J. S. Porter. 

Painter's Club will meet at 8 p. m. 
in Art Students' League. 

Library Board, 8 p. m. 

Board of Supervisors, 9:30 a. m. 

Minnesota Society, Chamber of 
Commerce, 8 p. m. 

City Council, 1 :30 p. m. 

Police Commission, 2:30 p. m. 

Civil Service Commission, 4:30 p.m. 

Woman's Orchestra of Los Ange- 
les, Blanchard Hall, 3 p. m., weekly 
rehearsal. 

California Business Woman's Asso- 
ciation meets at 309 West Third St., 
8 p. m., subject "Current Events", 
Mrs. F. C. Porter; "Statesmanship of 
Women", Mrs. E. B. Harbert. 

Wednesday, Jan. 20.— Ebell Club. 
"The Emmanuel Movement". Mrs. 
W. F. Pleas, 10:30 a. m. 

Ruskin Art Club, "History of Amer- 
ican House Building", Mrs. Hilbert 
and Mrs. Owens, 10 a. m. 

Board of Health, 4 p. m. 

Meeting of Board of Southwest 
Museum at Hamburger Building, 3 
p. m. 

Thursday, Jan. 21.— Ebell Club, 



13 
tch Painters", Mi 

10 a ill 

Im Commission, 10:30 a. in. 

Rag i inn- Contest, Simpson Audi- 

, S p m 

Friday, Jan. 22. — Friday Morning 
Club, "Women in Business", Dr. Rose 
I. Burcham, 10:30 a. m. 

Chamber of Commerce, reception 

to visitors from Walla Walla, eve- 
ning. 

Supply i 'ommittei . in a m., Citj 
Hall. 

Bi ii d of Public Works, 2 p. m. 

II ng ' ommission, 4:3o p. m. 

Second annual Throop vaudeville al 
Shakespeare Club Hon-,, Pasadena. 

Saturday, Jan. 23.— City Club lunch- 
eon, Hotel Westminster, 12:15, 
+ + * 
Sound PHilosopHy 

Of all methods of making another 
person angry and disagreeable the 
worst is to tell him that he will "have 
to" do something, says the Railroad 
Employee. How often do we hear 
"You will have to go to the other 
window," "you will have to go into 
I In other car," "you will have to wait 
an hour." "you will have to write the 
general passenger agent or superin- 
tendent," and the like. Primarily we 
are all free agents and don't "have 
lo" do a darned thing. We may find 
it expedient or necessary to a certain 
end, but we don't even "have to" eat 
if w ; e don't want to. 

How easy to put the direction in 
another manner, such as, "the other 
window, please," or "will you kindly 
lake the car ahead," or "the rules re- 
quire"; a short, very short, explana- 
tion of why a certain thing is neces- 
sary will always work wonders in 
avoiding trouble. 

*• + + 

Correct Speech 

Small Fred — Papa, are we going to 
have a girlvanized iron roof on our 
new house? 

I'apa — Girlvanized! You mean gal- 
vanized, don't you? 

Small Fred — Yes; but teacher said 
we should say "girl" instead of "gal", 
— Chicago News. 



Desks 



Desks 



Desks 



Desks 



Desks 




Desks 



Desks 



Desks 



Desks 



Bronson Desk Co. 541 t"}lt r £ 8 St 



Los Angeles, Cal. 



14 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



.Arizona's Natural Bridge 

A gigantic natural bridge situated in 
the wilderness of Arizona and pos- 
sessing even more marvels than the 
natural bridge of Virginia, is described 
by Dwight E. Woodbridge, a Duluth 
mining engineer. 

Not only is this bridge a natural 
wonder but its span and width are so 
great that its floor has been converted 
into a truck garden. The bridge is 10U 
miles south of Jerome. Travellers 
who frequent that part of the country 
pass within a few miles of it without 
visiting the natural wonder. 

Mr. Woodbridge stopped at the 
bridge while on a horseback trip 
through that section of the country. 
At the edge of the bridge he found 
a cottage occupied by an old Indian 
fighter who went there several years 
ago and cultivated the few fertile spots 
in the canon. While there M'r. Wood- 
bridge was served with a meal which 
was raised in the garden on the 
bridge. 

For length of span this bridge 
eclipses the Virginia bridge or any 
of the other natural bridges in Ameri- 
ca. Its span is more than 200 feet 
and it stretches across a branch of 
the Verde River, which rushes through 
the gorge 200 feet below. The bridge 
is about 180 feet in width, the floor 
being as level as that of a bridge 
built by man. Along the sides of the 
stream which runs below are dozens 
of springs from which warm water 
flows continually. The spot is 100 
miles from a railroad. 
+ <• + 
Time and Money 

Professor Stone — To the geologist 
a thousand years or so are not counted 
as any time at all. 

Man in the Audience — Great Scot! 
And to think that I made a tempor- 
ary loan of £2 to a man who holds 
such views! — Tit-Bits. 
♦ ♦ ♦ 
She Stopped It 

"I saw an odd case of interference 
with other folks' business the other 
day in the subway," said a young man 
to a New York Times reporter. 'A 
very pretty and young girl got in a 
local train on the upper West Side. 
A couple of stations further on, in 
came a young man who sat where he 
could see the girl. 

"She was good to look at, too. He 
caught her eye and apparently held 
her attention. Maybe it wasn't just 
the right thing for her to do, but after 
a time she moved her head and ob- 
viously tried to smother a smile. 

"The young chap wasn't a bit back- 
ward and before the train got much 
further along he was sitting in the 
cross seat with the girl and chatting. 

"There was a middle aged woman 
in the car who apparently had watched 
the whole affair just as I had. The 
car was practically empty and the 
others in it were reading newspapers 
and hadn't paid attention to what was 
going on. 

"First thing I knew the woman 
changed from one of the lengthwise 
seats and took her place in the very 
cross scat where the two were sitting. 



They didn't notice her until she 
leaned over and said something to the 
girl. I could just imagine from her 
looks that she was asking: 'Do you 
know this young man?' 

"The girl flushed up, looked three 
times as pretty and the woman kept 
on talking and looking stern. 

"The upshot of it was that the 
young fellow got out at the next sta- 
tion, apparently to hide his embarrass- 
ment, and the girl stayed where she 
was. 

"After she'd broken up the little 
party the woman moved out of the 
seat and back to where she was be. 
fore. It made me a little sore and I 
felt like asking her what business it 
was of hers. But then again it wasn't 
my business either, so I didn't." 
■h + * 
Oh, Darling! 

A Philadelphia woman, whose given 
name is Mary, as is also the name of 
her daughter, had recently engaged a 
domestic when, to her embarrassment, 
she discovered that the servant's name 
too was Mary. 

Whereupon, according to Harper's 
Weekly, there ensued a struggle to in- 
duce the applicant to relinquish her 
idea that she must be addressed by 
her Christian, name. For some time 
she was rigidly uncompromising. 

"Under the circumstances," said the 
lady of the house, "there is nothing to 
do but to follow the English custom 
and call you by your last name. What 
is it?" 

"Well, mum," answered the girl, 
dubiously, "it's 'Darling.'" 

* * * 

Such a Fame 

A young engineer who has been 
doing a job in Kansas has returned 
to New York with this yarn: 

One night he happened to be at a 
little cross-roads grocery store at a 
village beyond the Ozark ridge of 
mountains. Getting into a conversa- 
tion with the frequenters of the place, 
he happened to mention Chauncey M. 
Depew. 

The name aroused an old fellow 
who had been placidly smoking be- 
side the stove. 

"Depew?" he mused. "Chauncey 
Depew? I don't recollect no feller of 
that name about here. He must come 
from beyond the Ridge." 

* * ♦ 

Didn't linow His Own CooK 

A minister of a fashionable church 
in Newark had always left the greet- 
ing of strangers to be attended to by 
the ushers, until he read the newspaper 
articles in reference to the matter. 

"Suppose a representative should 
vis.it our church?" said his wife. 
"Wouldn't it be awful?" 

"It would," the minister admitted. 

The following Sunday evening he 
noticed a plainly dressed woman in 
one of the fre>e pews. She sat alone 
and was clearly not a member of the 
flock. After the benediction the min- 
ister hastened and intercepted her at 
the door. 

"How do you do?" he said, offering 
his hand. "I am very 'glad to have 
you with us." 



"Thank yon," replied the young 
woman. 

"I hope we may see you often in 
our church home," he went on. "We 
are always glad to welcome new 
faces." 

"Yes, sir." 

"Do you live in this parish?" he 
asked. 

The girl looked blank. 

"If you will give me your address 
my wife and I will call on you some 
evening. 

"You wouldn't need to go far, sir," 
said the young woman, "I'm your 
cook!" 

* * * 

Clear Instance 

Sapleigh — Queer fellahs, these poets. 
There's the one, for instance, who 
speaks of "an aching void." Now, how 
can there be an aching void? 

Miss Blunt — Have you never had a 
headache, Mr. Sapleigh? — Boston 
Transcript. 

* + * 

As Courage Oozed 

The Pacific Coast Congressman was 
starting for the capital. 

"On one point I am resolved," he 
said to his admiring constituents, 
"Cannon can't bulldoze me. I defy 
him. We're after his scalp." 

"Cannon has not in all respects been 
an ideal presiding officer," he told a 
reporter at Omaha. 

"Cannon?" he replied to an inter- 
viewer: "well, perhaps he has not been 
without faults, but," etc. 

"Hello!" said the newspaper repre- 



sentative at Washington. "Glad to 
see you're back. Hear you're going 
to fight Cannon. How about it?" 

"Fight Cannon! Well, of all the 
ridiculous yarns! Why, he's the best 
presiding officer that," etc.— Philadel- 
phia Ledger. 

* * * 
Infant Hercules 

"Is the baby strong?" 

"Well, rather. ' You know what a 
tremendous voice he has?" 

"Yes." 

"Well, he lifts that five or six 
times an hour." — Tit-Bits. 

* + + 
Incredible 

"Over here," said the Arab guide, 
"we have another mummy. From the 
cooking utensils found near her she 
is supposed to have been a cook. For 
2000 years she has remained just 
where she was found." 

"Bosh!" scoffed the American tour- 
ist, "that's no cook." 

"Why not?" 

"Who ever heard of a cook remain- 
ing in one place that long?" — Chicago 
News. 

■]••{■■£ 

Not For Him 

M'rs. Knicker — Will you have an 
early English breakfast room in your 
new house? 

Mrs. Newrich — No; I asked Hiram 
about that, and he said he wasn't go- 
ing to get up till 10 o'clock nowadays. 
— Exchange. 

* + + 
Blushes are only skin deep. 




Thron^hDailyBehcreen 

^LOS ANGELES J//4 VI 11*''* 

JJUT&UCSXOl/TJZ UPM CtMW. 



A PALATIAL TRAIN FOR PARTICULAR PEOPLE 

Information and tickets at 6oi So. Spring St., Los Angeles, or any 
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Furniture, Carpets, Rugs, Draperies, Etc. 

Radical reductions in all lines throughout our entire stock — genuine 
bargains for everyone; choicest sorts of home-furnishings at the or- 
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rurniturp.Carpota.Ru^s.Drupiiriei and Wall Papers 
Exclusive Product ionsof Highest Character 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



IS 



Menial Mr»ltn|;of \orr 

rule 

Jinily 

if mind as 
It 

lilies. It 

■■<■ :nicl 

that which is contum- 

It delivers the mind from the 

y and raises it 

mplation of it > di 

+ + + 

Had Been There 
"What's the difference 

"Well. I with- 

mid be valor." 
"I ■ 

"And in come hack by a different 
would be discretion."— 
viile Courier- Journal. 

* * + 

Too Much to Expect 
A certain drill-sergeant whose 

crity had made him unpopular with 

his company \v . 

recruits through the funeral ex 

Opening the ranks so as to admit 

the pa the supposed cortege 

between them, the instructor, by way 

of practical explanation, walked slow- 
ing formed by the two 

ranks, saj in ; as lie did so: 

"Now, 1 am the corpse. Pay atten- 

Having reached the end of the party 

ned round, regarded them with 

a scrutinizing eye for a moment or 

two. then remarked: 

"Your 'and- is right and your 'eads 
i- right but you 'aven'l got that look 
gret you oughl t<i 'ave." — Tit- 
Manly 

"What a masculine creature 
is!" 

"I hadn't noticed it. What has she 
done ?" 

"I saw hi r c ive tin- soda clerk a 
nickel, when -he had five pennies in 
her purse " -Cleveland Leader. 

* + + 
Located 

"Saj ." queried the would- be humor- 
ist, "where is that place, Atoms, that 
so in my pi . .iile are blown h i '" 

"It's just the other side of Effigy, 
the place in which SO many people 

ure hanged," answ ered the solemn pet 
s n —I ^hicagi ' New - 

* * * 

Ate the Prize 

Cool- M\ dog took first prize al 
the cat show I look -Hon was that? 
I ook Mi l. ii >k the eat. — Journal of 
Zoophily. 



Chusp Enough 

Penn— \nd h 
her 1 to him 

St nl 
that a compliment 

't i- "Wild Animals I Have 
'«'» s. 
+ + + 
And So They Were Married 

The Heiress "And 

me if I losi all my money"-" 

In that cas c would tin 

for in. 

ire you love me quite 

apart from my money?" 

(More earnestly)— "More than that. 
1 could even hoe your niollc} 
from yi mi 

ii :li ,'l.n ling. I want you 
always to separate me and my money 
in your thought-'' 

(Most earnestly) — "In thought and 
in deed, it shall be my lifelong en- 
ir to separate you and your 
j " —Si luthwestern Bi tolc, 
+ * * 
Exceptional 
The June bride frowned 
"These tomatoes," -lie said, "are 
just twice as dear as those across the 
-t i eet. Why is it?" 

"Ah. ma'am, these" — and the 'gro- 
cer smiled — "these are hand-picked." 
She blushed. 

"Of course," -he -aid hastily, "1 
might have known. Give me a bushel, 
please." — Harper's Weekly. 

* + + 

To Los Ang'eles Ladies 
A toast to I. os Angeles ladies: To 
their sweetness we give love: to their 
beauty, admiration; to their hats, the 
whole sidewalk. 

* ♦ + 
Violent Conversation 

The American — You say your 
brother dislocated his arm talking 
through the telephone? 

The Frenchman — Oui, Monsieur; he" 
make too violent gesture! — Yonkcrs 
Stat esman. 

■j* V V 

A Dear Friend 

"1 hear yer fren' Tamson's married 
again." 

"Aye, SO he is, lie's liceu a dear 
fren' tae me. He's cost me three wad- 
din' presents an' 1 « " wreaths." — Dun- 
dee Advertiser. 

Ai A A 

You may close your eyes to your 
"ii n faults, but that doesn't put the 
blinkers on your neighbor. 

* * * 

"ion can never light a man's foes 
unless you tire his friend. 
+ * * 

It's no use denying sin's service 
when you are enjoying its salary. 

* * * 

Hearing hatred i a g 1 deal like 

carrying vitrol in a mighty thin flask, 

* * * 

If you would shinr a- the stars 
gin wiili ,i little sunshine now 



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THE STARR PIANO CO. 

Manufacturers 
Factory Warerooms 413 WEST FIFTH STREET 




Japanese and Oriental 

Art Curios 

KIMONOS ANT) 
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You make no mistake when buying 
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our prices are reasonable. 

KaJ^iuchi Bros. 

T)ire£t Importers 

533 South Broadway 



/: 



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FOR RENT 

Studios and" Assembly Halls 
in the 

Walker Auditorium 
Building 

Just being completed on (jrand 
Avenue near 7tn St. 

WALTER JENKINS, Superintendent 
ART BUILDING 



Du Bois & Davidson 

Furniture Company 

212-314 W. Sixth St. 
Los Angeles, Cal. 

We Quit Business 

High Grade Furniture 

5s£r~AtCost 

Lace Curtains 



Phone F4146 



Mail Orders 



WESTERN GEM CO. 

Cutters and Dealers in Precious 
Stones 

Jewelry Made to Order 

2206 S. Main St., Los Angeles, Cal. 




Leading Clothiers (INO 

437-439-441-443 South Spring 
Between Fourth and Fifth Streets. 

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OUTFITTER S 

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Andirons— Grates- 
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Domestic and Imported Tiles 
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VOICE CULTURE 

Ftench, German and Italian diction 

iCoacn'rig- for Opera, Concert and 

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Studio 330 Blanchard Building 

Exchange 82 

Monday and Thursday mornings; 
Tuesday and Friday afternoons. 

Residence Phone A 9045 



Joseph R. Loftus Co., Inc. 

128 West, 6th St,. 

Phonei Main and F 'S'8 

. . . Oraoge Ranches and Country Property . . . 



J. E. MEYER 

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Broker and Dealer in 

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202 Mercantile Place 

at Spring St. 



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PACIFIC OU 




Vol. VI. Mo. 4. 



Los Jtngeles, California, January 23, 1909- 



10 Cents $2.00 a Year 



Published Every Saturday 

Lissner Building. Los Angeles, California, by the 

PACIFIC OUTLOOK COMPANY 

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THE PACIFIC OUTLOOK'S POLICY 

The Pacific Outlook desires to state unequivo- 

cally that it is not the organ of any creed, sect, 

political party, organization, corporation or per- 

1 ;it is absolutely free and untrammelled in 

its associations. 

It stands unqualifiedly, and without fear, for 
that which it believes to be true, clean, honest 
and right in human affairs — political, secular. 
commercial and industrial; and in its columns 
will always maintain an unprejudiced and im- 
partial attitude in its discussion of all subjects 
of universal or local interest. 

GEORGE BAKER AXDERSON, Editor 

COMMENT 



RECALL THE MAYOR 



IT IS must certainly true tint Arthur C. 
Harper, mayor of Los Angeles, is eminently 
entitled to the full measure of punishment 
which the invocation of the recall provision 
1 if the < 'in Charter would entail. Seldom in 
the history of American municipalities has 
the chief executive of a citv consistently 
shown so little regard for the wishes of the 
better class uf citizens and tax-pavers. Al- 
most from the beginning- of his administra- 
tion Mayor Harper has treated in a light 
and disdainful manner nearly. all of the sug- 
gestions that lie administer the affairs of the 
city with due regard to the welfare of the 
whole people rather than that he employ his 
high office largely for the purpose of building 
Up a personal machine. 

Fully a year and a half ago the Pacific 
Outlook warned the mayor of the fate that 
was in store for him if he persisted in his 
folly — arrogant and supercilious defiance of 
the wishes of the people of Los Angeles. 
Hut, like one of the Pharaohs of old, the 
mayor "hardened his heart" and silently 
snickered. 

The people! Why, who in blue blazes are 
the people, anyway? What in the name of 
the most approved brand of machine politics 
have the people got to do with the adminis- 



tration of the affair- uf the city, anyhow? 

The people! Hub.! The people ! huh ! 

Well. Mr. Mayor Harper, the people, 
whom you have relegated in your aspiring 
dreams to places unmentionable because un- 
known, seems to be ready to "go to hat." It 
i- high time the) hail at least one chance to 
play, and the Pacific Outlook, in common 
with other publications and institutions ami 
individuals in Los Angeles who have faith- 
fully endeavored to dissuade you from the 
political follies you have had in contempla- 
tion, and some of which you have put into 
successful operation, now most earnestly 
hopes that nothing can arise to prevent the 
consummation of the wishes of those who 
have the welfare of this city most closely to 
heart; namely, that the recall be invoked 
and that you be relegated to that domain m 
which you so apparently have desired to see 
"the people" confined — a state of innocuous 
desuetude. 

MINING VANDALS 



THE United States Geological Survey 
reports that the condition of the mining in- 
dustry in California during 1908 was some- 
what improved over that of 1907, and an 
important increase in output will doubtless 
be shown when the final figures are com- 
piled. In 1907 there was a decided falling 
off in the gold yield as compared with that of 
the previous year. There was a materially 
iessened output of siliceous ores, due at 
some mines to labor strikes.- The placers 
also showed a decrease in gold yield, the 
hydraulic, drift, dredge, and surface placers 
all showing a decline as compared with 
1906. A poor water season was largely re- 
sponsible for this decrease. Moreover, tbe 
spring floods destroyed several dredgers and 
damaged several others, so that expecta- 
tions of an increase from this source were 
not realized. The conditions changed in 
1908. There -were no labor troubles of mo- 
ment to interfere with steady operations in 
the epiartz mines, though the shortness of 
the water season caused large numbers of 
stamps to be "hung up" and a good many 
mines to close for several months for lack 
of power. The report goes on to say: 

There are now seventy dredgers operating in 
the gold fields of California. The largest propor- 
tion of the silver output of the State is derived 
from copper-smelting operations, though a con- 
siderable amount comes from quartz and placer 
mines. Smelters that were idle in 1907 became 

cti e in 1908, so that there was probably a larger 
silver yield in the latter year. This is also true 
of copper. The lead output may also show a 

moderate increase, but a diminished zinc yield 



is expected. Notwithstanding the drought, which 
affected the quartz and placer mines of the State 
materially, the final figures "i gold, silver, coppei 
and lead production in California for 1908 are 
expected to show- a general increase as compared 
with the total yield of 1907. 

The estimates of the Director of the Mint ^i \ o 
the California output of gold in 1908 as $19,581,- 
57(1. compared to $16,853,500 in 1907. 

It is little short of criminal to permit the 
operation of a single dredge in the valley 
gold-bearing lands of California. Already 
thousands upon thousands of acres of land 
of great value for agricultural purposes has 
been rendered absolutely worthless for all 
time to come by the gold-dredge vandals. 
Complaint has been made that not only is 
the land dredged ruined, but the beds of 
streams are so filled with debris as to cause 
disastrous overflows during the torrential 
period. The floods of the past few days in 
the Sacramento valley would have been ac- 
companied by less loss if the stream's bed 
had not been overburdened by debris de^ 
posited by dredge miners, who seem willing 
to sacrifice everything to their lust for gold. 
♦ ♦ ♦ 

PARCELS POST REFORM 

In discussing the subject of the parcels 
post the Sacramento Bee calls attention to 
the fact that Edward Berwick of Montererv, 
who has been a tireless advocate of a cheap 
parcels post in this country, made a good 
fight in the recent Trans-Mississippi Com- 
mercial Congress for this much-needed re- 
form, but was beaten by a large majority. 

Among the leading opponents of Berwick 
on the floor were those stanch friends of 
the railroads and associated interests, Colo- 
nel John P. Irish, Naval Officer of the port 
of San Francisco, and Arthur Briggs, Man- 
ager of the State Board of Trade. These 
gentlemen of course did not urge the fact 
that cheap carriage of parcels by mail would 
deprive Wells-Fargo and other express com- 
panies of the rich privilege they now enjoy 
of charging extortionate prices for the serv- 
ice they perform, but that is the chief ob- 
stacle to a better parcels post service in tbe 
interest of the people. 

Nothing less scandalous are the charges 
for parcels sent through the mails in the 
United States, compared with those abroad. 
In this country the postal charge on mer- 
chandise is a flat rate of a cent an ounce or 
16 cents a pound, with a limit of weight 
of four pounds. So a four-pound parcel 
needs stamps to the amount of 64 cents, 
while in Great Britain a parcel of the same 
weight mav be mailed for twelve cents. And 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



in Great Britain parcels may be sent by mail 
between any two points at rates varying 
from five cents for one pound to twenty- 
four cents for eleven pounds, which is the 
weight limit. 

Moreover, in British towns and cities par- 
cels are collected by the postmen, and there 
is also parcel delivery and collection in the 
rural districts. Immediate parcel delivery 
by special messengers may be had, in the 
large towns and cities, the charge being only 
five cents additional per mile from the post 
office, for a package not exceeding one 
pound, and, if heavier, a trifle more. A cab 
will be used for special delivery of a parcel 
from the post office if prepayment of a very 
moderate charge is made by the sender. 

Such low charges and facilities show that 
in Great Britain, as in other European coun- 
tries, the aim of the postal service is to give 
the public the utmost convenience and the 
best possible service at the lowest possible 
charge. In the United States, on the con- 
trary, the narrow postal regulations regard- 
ing parcels, and the high rates of postage 
required, are devised to limit the service. 
And this is done in the interest of the ex- 
press companies, which are controlled by 
the railroads, and work with them to prevent 
any remedial legislation. 

Our government still pays enormously 
excessive rates to the railroads for the car- 
riage of mails, although there has of late 
been some relative reduction in the cost ol 
the service. This high cost is one of the 
excuses for the maintenance of the present 
excessive postal rates on parcels. The gov- 
ernment pays the railroads something like 
$38,000,000 a year for carrying mails. 

But in France, where the railroads are 
under government control — not the govern- 
ment under railroad control — the mails are 
carried free of charge, in consideration for 
the privilege of right of way or eminent do- 
main. 

In Germany, all railroads are required to 
carry one mail car free, and additional mail 
cars are carried at a small cost. But in the 
United States the railroads carry no mail 
cars free, and charge a very high rental for 
mail cars, in addition to enormous rates for 
hauling the mail matter — rates three or foui 
times those charged the express companies 
for a like service. 

In Germany also, the postal limit of 
weight of parcels is 110 pounds, and one 
may send a package of that weight from one 
end of Germany to the other at a total cost 
of thirty cents in our money. And it will 
be delivered at destination. For two or six 
cents extra the government insures the pack- 
age against loss and guarantees safe deliv- 
ery. 

We wonder how much longer the people 
are going to submit to being robbed by the 
express companies. If anybody were to put 
this in the form of a question we should be 
tempted to answer : Just so long as legisla- 
ture in states like California continues to 



elect men like Perkins and Flint, stanch 
friends and defenders of the railroads and 
express companies, to the United States 
Senate. 

* + * 

EENY, MEENY, MINEY MO 



THE State Railroad Commission, like our 
great and grand friend' made famous five 
years ago by a local contemporary, Speaker 
Stanton, have suddenly acqvtired a vast fund 
of virtue, it would appear. In three unani- 
mous decisions the board fined the Atchison. 
Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad company 
$5000 for failure to conform to the rates es- 
tablished by the Commission. It also de- 
clared several of the rates of the Santa Fe 
and the Southern Pacific to be unjustly dis- 
criminatory, and exonerated the San Pedro, 
Los Angeles and Salt Lake Railroad from 
similar charges, on which it had had a hear- 
ing. The Southern Pacific company es- 
caped a fine only because none of its rates 
refunded on had ever been legally estab- 
lished by the Commission. 

Let us all observe that it was the Santa 
Fe, not the Southern Pafic, which was so 
boldly fined by this wise, virtuous and, above 
all things, discreet court. The Southern 
Pacific escaped because, forsooth, the com- 
mission had not been able to establish the 
legality or illegality of the rates refunded. 
There now remains to the aggrieved shipper 
the doubtful remedy of suing the railroad 
companies under the law of 1878, and in 
case they obtain judgments the fines will 
go to the public school fund of the State. 

What a farce is this commission, indeed! 
What a jest ! What a source of humiliation 
to. the great state of California ! It cannot 
find anything illegal in the rebating done 
and proven to have been done by the South- 
ern Pacific company, proprietors of the com- 
mission, but it can find a scape goat in the 
Santa Fe. 

* * * 
THE SAFE FOUNDATION 



THE most important measure before the 
State Legislature, from every viewpoint, is 
that providing for the Direct Legislation, 
or Initiative. The movement has taken form 
in proposed constitutional amendments in- 
troduced in the Senate by Senator Black and 
in the Assembly by Mr. Drew. The amend- 
ment provides that upon the presentation to 
the Secretary of State of a petition signed by 
qualified electors of the State as many in 
number as eight per cent of all the votes cast 
for Governor at the last election for Gover- 
nor, proposing a law, a statute or an amend- 
ment to the Constitution, set forth in full in 
said petition, the secretary of state must sub- 
mit the said proposed law, statute or amend- 
ment to the electors at the next succeeding 
general election occurring subsequent to 
ninety days after the presentation of said pe- 
tition. In all matters pertaining to the sub- 
mission, and the adoption or the rejection 



of the same, the secretary of state shall be 
guided by the general laws, particularly 
those applicable to Constitutional amend- 
ments, until legislation shall be especially 
provided for. If the number of electors 
voting in favor of any proposed measure ex- 
ceed the number voting against it, the pro- 
posed measure thereby becomes adopted and 
in full force and effect. 

If petitions for the initiation of statutory 
law be filed with the secretary of state not 
less than thirty days before any regular or 
special session of the Legislature, the secre- 
tary of state shall transmit the same to the 
Legislature as soon as it convenes. Such 
initiative measures shall take precedence 
over all other measures in the Legislature 
excepting appropriation bills. The Legisla- 
ture may enact any initiative measure, with- 
out change or amendment, but in all cases 
proposed amendments to the Constitution 
must be submitted to the electors for ap- 
proval or rejection. If any such initiative 
shall be rejected by the Legislature, or no 
action be taken upon it by the Legislature 
within forty days from the date of its trans- 
mission, the secretary of state shall submit 
it to the electors for approval or rejection at 
the next ensuing general election. The Leg- 
islature may reject any measure by initiative 
petition, and propose a different one to ac- 
complish the same purpose, but in such event 
both measures shall be submitted to the 
electors for their rejection or approval by 
the secretary of state at the next ensuing 
general election. The veto power of the 
Governor shall not extend to measures 
adopted by direct vote of the people. A 
statute adopted by direct vote of the people 
can be repealed or amended only by direct 
vote of the people. 

The Initiative is the one certain solution 
of the evils of machine politics. Regardless 
of the attitude of a Legislature controlled bv 
corrupt men, with the Initiative the people 
may propose and adopt, if they will to do 
so, not only any amendment to the Consti- 
tution, but any law. For example, suppose 
the Anti-Racetrack Gambling bill fail of pas- 
sage. If the Initiative be adopted the peo- 
ple may proopse the same bill by petition 
and vote upon it at the election succeeding 
its adoption. 

There is little doubt that the majority of 
people in Los Ang-eles favor the principle 
of the Initiative. Those who do should 
communicate their attitude to their repre- 
sentatives at Sacramento at once. The fate 
of the measure may hang upon the action 
of the people within the next week. 

* * * 

His Mild Response 

"Why in the world don't you win one of 
those big Nobel prizes, John ?" snapped 
Mrs. McStingle. 

"Because, my dear," he meekly replied, 
"they don't give Nobel prizes to domestic 
martyrs." — Cleveland Leader. 






CHILE CON CARNE 



By 

Ghoulish Attraction. — The announcement 

Whirling 
and creeping fl 

nuity ni.r. 

• in advertising without 
gent I;, hand on one's trunk and 

-a\ ir. ler w here I am 

a tiling as a ghoul- 
ish attraction. 

Drunk from Dining. — Dr. Evans of Chica- 
> s that he thii pie drunk from 

over feeding arc almost as immoral as 

stupify themselves with liquors. Men 
drunk from liquor and men drunk from over- 
eating arc mos ptible to pneumonia 
and die of it. The majority or casi 
pneumonia arc of patients wh i con! 
the disease after a drunken debauch or who 
were drunk from overfeeding." Pneumonia 
distributes death among the overfed quite as 
willingly, apparently, as among those who 
partake of tipsy fluids to the point ol in 
equilibrium. 



Luck in the Figure Nine. — Pei iple who be- 
lieve in the mysterious properties of figures 
will be interested in the declaration of a 
New York business man that this will be a 
prospi ear for the country because it 

ains the figure nine, which has always 
proved a good omen in the history of the 
country. Jle cites the business revival of 
1839, following the panic of '37, the discov- 
ery of gold in California in 1849, the open- 
ing of the Colorado mines in 1869, the era of 
prosperity which set in in 187'), the boom 
period of 1889-'93, and lastly the boom which 
set in in 1899, following the Spanish War. 
"It looks as if history would repeat itself 
in 1909," he concludes. This is the kind of 
news the country likes to hear, and the figure 
nine may be assured that it will be given 
due credit if the omen holds good. There is 
at least as much justification for prophecy 
based on lucky numbers as there is for 
weather predictions based on the wishbone 
of a goose. 



Gamesters Who Lose. — The Suicides' 
Cemetery at Monte Carlo is a desolate tract 
of waste land. It is covered with stones and 
refuse, surrounded by high walls and beset 
with wild plants and weeds. The graves lie 
flat among the rank grasses, growing up 
among the stones and sand. At the head of 
the graves arc pieces of wood about a Eoot 
high, and each piece of wood bears a num- 
ber. On .the wall may be seen a Tew wreaths, 
with bits of visiting card- attached to them. 
The officials of the Casino know who placed 
them there, and they guard their secret well. 
In time the wreaths drop off the wall and be- 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 

■hie which 
all but hid. , sentences 

are written on the visiting cards attached 
to the u r. i as \ mon pen 

a mon til--. emcterj might be a 

for the but ■ ar distant from 

any road, and only the casual rambler i- like- 
find it. Above i; 

woods. There i- a moral for all gamblers 
in this brief tale. 



Freedom - no freedom in imper- 

m, in -pile of the makeshift conduct w c 

ilh. A little le-s well- 
much easier than -. I perform- 

l i imorrow i lefl ove 

purpi rid cure. A calender 

with its string of days, cob n h 
we mean to sort and thread gorgeous- 

I) bye an. I live. I have all the time there is, 
ll i n's the pity and seem to make of the 
bulk of it but petty chronicle-. 



Mannerisms. — It is an excellent thing to 
be eccentric. To have an oddity of manner 
is to have shield. The best thin;.' one can 
do i- to train one's friends to overlook one's 
foible-. The might of weakness is an all 
conquering force. The man who can submit 
to pity and ridicule is sure to win his way in 
the end. He is dauntless, because he is not 
governed by jeers like most of his fellows. 
Assume a pose as soon as you can if you 
would live in comfort. Tell your acquaint- 
ances that you think in French and praise 
the antipodes. Thus you will escape many 
homely duties, the bothersome tasks which 
destroy your powers of indolence. 
4« * * 
Gold-win SmitH on the Ag'e 

"Then and Now," the title of an article 
bearing his Christmas message to the stu- 
dents of Cornell University, where he once 
taught, shows Goldwin Smith at the age of 
86 still one of the torebbearers of civiliza- 
tion. "Alan, let the evolutionists remem- 
ber, advances and rises. The beast does 
not." Unlike brutes, humanity advances, 
"and we cannot tell what the end will be ; 
whether it may be the final ascendency of 
the spiritual over the material in man." He 
has witnessed the after-blasts of the French 
Revolution; they have beaten the political 
face of Europe and careered far into the 
stagnant East. Everywhere he sees democ- 
racy triumphant, invading autocratic pal- 
aces, and possessing constitutional monar- 
chies like England with greater force even 
than our own Republic. Indeed, he regards 
tl'e United States as relatively a backward 
nation in the march of democracy. 

But his almost mystical insight, says the 
New York Times, perceives something more 
momentous in this age than its political 
movement in the advance of science. This 
i- making the nations om Commonwealth 
iding the means i oser o immuni- 
cation. The Suez Canal is transforming In- 
dia. The locomotive, which bore Greville 



fifty J at the shuddering 

an hour, will soon bv the a 
tricitv attain 125 mile- an hour, convt 
the whole countryside into a suburb. 
Throu 

." and the demark. 
of national character must evenluallv 
away. "All nan I the fruit o 

clime-." Me hear- rumors of war and oi 

war's more deadly muniment.- a step bai \t 

ward. Most significant of the change 

wrought in the modern mind, the Christmas 

chimes no longer -p. al 30 much of the 
( Ihurch as i if the home. 

The parliament of man, the federation 
of the world, is Goldwin Smith's watch- 
word. It i- strange that his profound ag- 
nosticism be so nearly reconciled to the 
teaching- of the prophet who cried: "Pre- 
pare ye in the wilderness the way of Je- 
hovah. * * * And the crooked shall be- 
come straight, and the rough ways smooth." 

* * * 

Cause of CatastropKe 

The helplessness of science to give warn- 
ing cf a stupendous catastrophe like the 
Messina earthquake has been generally de- 
plored by the leading writers. Professor 
.Milne has provided a cue for scientific dis- 
cussion by describing the land's dislocation 
as submarine and apparently volcanic, and 
the natural cause of disturbance as the .up- 
ward movement of masses of the mainland, 
followed by compression and the cracking 
of the sea bottom. Neither he nor any other 
investigator suggests a practical method of 
forecasting the impending shocks, much less 
of preventing widespread destruction of life 
and property. 

Although Messina and Reggio were within 
one of the best known earthquake areas, 
their buildings, with few exceptions, were in- 
sured in some French and Austrian com- 
panies only against fire, and the liabilities 
for the catastrophe will be disputed, as in 
the case of San Francisco. English com- 
panies had little business in the destroyed 
quarter and will not suffer serious losses. 
So far as is known, only one Messina build- 
ing was directly insured in England against 
earthquake, although the town lay on the 
edge of a geological fracture, where the bot- 
tom of the sea basin was likely to be crum- 
pled up under pressure. 

The wisdom of the scientific writers is 
exhausted when they recommend the Japa- 
nese practice of building single story struc- 
tures in sections menaced with shocks. The 
functions of preachers tomorrow will be 
even more difficult when they undertake to 
reconcile the laws of nature with the moral 
government of the universe. Awe inspiring 
as the earthquake has been, it has invo 
a smaller loss of life, less devastation of 
property and less human suffering than 
would have the campaigns which diplomat- 
nid newsmongers have been planning 
with light hearts for the last twelve months. 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



New Contagion of Reform 

When Barlow, Tilden, O'Connor and 
Laroque showed up Tweed and Company in 
New York,Phi!adelphia was shocked, but not 
reformed. When other men in the Quaker 
city showed up the forces of evil in that city, 
New York was shocked, but not reformed 
over again. When one of the many house- 
cleanings it has experienced agitated Cin- 
cinnati or Chicago, sensation was adminis- 
tered within the limits of those places alone. 
When Grover Cleveland, as mayor, turned 
Buffalo upside down, Albany sorrowed for 
the sins of Buffalo, and so did Troy, but 
neither place realized that a day of judg- 
ment impended over it. The Scranton-Pitts- 
burg epoch or episode or emeute or sequen- 
tial shock, or whatever it is, can be regarded 
as unique, easier to note than to define. 

If this moral wave, which is making 
frightened wealth spasmodically philan- 
anhrotpic, or if the religious wave, which is 
affecting the hearts of men at the same 
time, in far separated places, can be regarded 
as accountable for this mysterious and al- 
most simultaneous reformation of Scranton 
and Pittsburg, then the category of the won- 
ders of the world has been enlarged. The 
arts have also come in. Science is enlisted 
on the side of salvation. A flashlight photo- 
graph was taken of a corrupted councilman 
who received marked bills from an unsus- 
pected detective, and on the strength of that 
revelation, President Roosevelt set his se- 
ret men at work and will share in history 
with others the credit of Pittsburg's re- 
formation, or whatever it is. We are living, 
we are moving', in a grand and awful time, 
and none can sin outside of his own mind, 
without certainty of detection, and may even 
then become the exposer of himself to jus- 
tice, should he go crazy or get drunk. 

If one had been asked to name two places 
more sodden than any other two, he would 
have said Scranton and Pittsburg, though 
with a sense of possible injustice to Wilkes- 
barre. It appears, however, that Scranton 
has been turned toward the light, and that 
by the reflection or ignition, Pittsburgh has 
been morally set on fire. Even Wilkesbarre, 
with its smug confidence that the New Je- 
rusalem is its social and moral inferior, may 
yet be brought to think on the evil of its 
ways, and may conclude that wealth is not 
worth, that money is not morality, that divi- 
dends are not divine, and that those who 
die worth a million and worth nothing else, 
may burn forever because of their essential 
poverty in the things of the spirit. 

* * * 
On tKe Sore Spot 

The assertion that E. H. Harriman is re- 
sponsible for the graft in San Francisco — an 
accusation made by Francis J. Heney at a 
public dinner in Philadelphia Saturday night 
— will strike . some readers as extravagant. 
A dinner is not, of course, the time and 
place for the presentation of detailed .legal 



proof. The gist of Mr. Heney's argument, 
however, is summed up in these words : 

"We must reason from cause to effect. 
The corruption of the city life in San Fran- 
cisco was not found in the deals made by 
Ruef, but was due to the fact that Harriman 
wanted to use certain men. Our real boss 
sits in New York city and reaches across 
the country in working out his schemes." 

Whether or not Mr. Heney has a clear 
case against Harriman, on whose malign ac- 
tivities in finance and politics we have more 
than once had occasion to comment, it is 
certain, says the New York Evening Post, 
that Mr. Heney has laid his finger on a very 
sore spot in our body politic. Members of 
Congress, legislators and aldermen are usu- 
ally tempted to accept bribes because some 
rich and unscrupulous man — or perhaps cor- 
poration — wishes to "use" them for private 
ends. The legislature of New York and of 
other states as well was, as C. E. Hughes 
abundantly showed, systematically-corrupted 
by a lobby maintained by the big insurance 
companies, under the deadly respectable 
management of our Alexanders, Hydes, Mc- 
Curdys and McCalls. The influence of the 
New York Central, under the control of the 
Vanderbilts, was equally potent and de- 
moralizing. Harrisburg has for years been 
a cesspool, and the politics of Pennsylvania 
a byword and a hissing-, partly because the 
Pennsylvania Railroad has been what it has' 
been. In our own city government the con- 
nection between the ruling powers and 
Thomas F. Ryan, the late William C. Whit- 
ney and other gentlemen-adventurers in 
street railway operations has been a huge 
scandal. But it is useless to multiply in- 
stances. We shall not get rid of the small 
rascals till we can punish the big ones. 

•fr + * 

Gold on Trial 

Upton Sinclair journeyed all the way to 
Niebelheim, the mythical scene of many of 
the Wagner operas, in order to find a char- 
acter to illustrate his theory that one man 
with sufficient wealth can control the 
world. To "Prince Hagen", ruler of the 
"Niebelungs", therefore, he gave a tunnel 
of gold and made him the personification of 
youthful arrogance, selfishness and cruelty. 
As a result, the end of the third act finds 
two of the world's captains of industry on 
their knees before him, while a third, who 
has been ruined, goes forth preaching the 
doctrine of democracy instead of conserva- 
tive republicanism, his former belief. He 
made his climax brutal, cold and very lit- 
eral, because he wished to arouse the people 
to a sense of their danger and to let them 
understand that the trend of national life in 
America is toward plutocracy, despotic and 
absolute in its nature. 

Sinclair need not have stretched his im- 
agination from Wall street to Wagner to 
illustrate his point, says Marion Michelson 
in the San Francisco Bulletin. He might 



have attended a session at the trial of Pat- 
rick Calhoun and listened to the expressions 
of sentiment upon the part of talesmen who 
might sit as jurors to determine if it is a 
crime for a man of wealth to bribe public 
servants in order to get special privileges 
which by right belong to the people. Then 
he would see the practical working out of 
his doctrine. Sinclair could then see how a 
terrible class war, resulting ill much wretch- 
edness and even in loss of life, had been 
turned to good account to save this captain 
of industry from punishment for his crime 
against the people and had been actually 
made to create sympathy for him. He could 
see Calhoun's gold, his family and even his 
social position placed in issue instead of the 
question "Did he or did he not bribe Fred P. 
Nichols to secure his vote for an overhead 
trolley franchise?" 

Sinclair, however, would have been grati- 
fied could he have passed yesterday in the 
courtroom and learned that for one David 
Cameron, who thinks that Calhoun is the 
one great man in the West because "he 
whipped the unwhipped mob," there are five 
Francis Frickes who "with .all due respect" 
to Calhoun, his family and his bags of gold, 
"understands that bribery is a crime" and 
that although it might have been a case of 
"hold-up and hand-out," the man who pays 
the bribe is quite as guilty as the man who 
accepts one. The young author, so earnest 
in his fight for the people, would doubtless 
have said that the answers of those venire- 
men showed an awakened public spirit and 



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from the bonds of the worship 

Id which argues well (or the future. 

< )ne hundred and fifty talesmen have now 

lined in the Calhoun case and of 

thi> venin ven have been actually 

ined in the box. Three veniremen have 

indicated that they are sufficiently free From 

th the state and the defense 

a fair trial. The three nun arc Peter An- 

thus, retired merchant; [oseph Dixon, clerk 

Fillmore hatter, and Walter 

Baskette, book-keeper fur the \Y. I'. Fuller 

Company. < >ne hundred and fifty more citi- 
zens will be brought into court on Tuesday. 
+ + + 

Children's Booh? in Bygone Days 
In picture books the children of today are 
well cared for. But the\ owe their good 
fortune more to improved methods of re- 
production than to an improvement in the 
artists working for their pleasure, writes a 
contributor to the London Chronicle. De- 
lightful as are the pictures of Mr. Rackham 
and others. Tcnnicl's Alice still holds her 
own. and the illustrations to "Shock-headed 
Peter" and Lear's "Nonsense Looks" are 
accepted as seriously as ever. There is 
danger i f a surfeit. If you have jam 
and cake for tea every day, you do not enjoy 
and cake so much when you go to a 
party, and you may even come to prefer 
plain bread and butter. The chief difference 
between today and yesterday seems to be 
that then every child had the same books 
and now every child has different ones. 

Perhaps there is another change. The 
writers of children's books no longer seem 
to have that almost ferociously moral ax to 
grind which needed such continual sharpen- 
ing in days gone by. They write more 
frankly for entertainment. The change need 
not be regretted. Children will swallow a 
good deal of crude, false moralizing without 
mental indigestion, but they are better with- 
out it, and the ethics of the "goody" book of 
a generation ago were often deplorable. A 
favorite figure in this kind of fiction was the 
precociously pious child, who set an example 
to his more worldly parents. The natural, 
but to him unpleasant, results of his be- 
havior he bore with Christian fortitude, un- 
til such time as he had succeeded in molding 
their characters to his heart's desire ; after 
which, his well-meant efforts having proved 
too much for his infant constitution, he not 
seldom crowned them with a most edifying 
death-bed scene. In fact, the prig stalked 
rampant through pages of mostly inferior 
print, and deserved everything he got in the 
way of martyrdom except its crown. In his 
most offensive form he is now dead and 
buried. He probably derived from "Sand- 
ford and Merlon" and persisted for nearly 
a century. 

Another and a less reprehensible figure 
was the father who was always improving 
the occasion. It is impossible to picture him 
without side wdiiskers and a shaven upper 
lip — a sort of evangelical Mr. Dombey and 



Enquire - Within I p< n Everything com 
bined. lie never seemed to have any other 

occupation than to -.. for walks with his 

children in a tall hat and square-toed 1 : -. 

His business was to cram them with infor- 
mation, his spoits to snare them in a net ol 
questions. He, too, i^ gone. The children 
of today, who expect their father- to act as 
their play-fellows, permitting them on oc- 
casions t" be quite humanly grurrfpy, would 
not stand his faultless precision for a mo- 
ment. He is happier beneath the stone that 
recalls his prim virtues, for he would be 
terribly shocked at the license now accorded 
to bis one-time victims. 

Put it would be unfair to sa\ that all the 
moral books of a generation or so back were 
out of scale. There were some 'unexception- 
able ones. Miss Charlotte Yonge had her 
Tractarian row to hoe, and she hoed it weil. 
and wrote excellent stories besides. A. L. 
I ). F. usually allowed for the weakness of 
childish flesh by sandwiching her stories 
and her sermons in alternate chapters. It 
was a convenient arrangement, and her stor- 
ies at least were good. 



Doubtful Borg'ain 

n't you remember me?" said the thill 
chap with the sharp ad yellow 

satchel. "Why, 1 am the corn doctor that 

ed \ our corns last summer." 
"Yeas, 1 remember yeou, stranger," mum- 
bled old Bill Spruceby, as he pulled his 

chair up closer to the red hot Stove in the 
bark of |as. in\ store. 

"Then bow is it you don't seem glad to 

see me? Didn't I remove them all for a 
quarter?" 

"Yeas, but after the coins were gone 1 
had to pay 39 cents for a barometer to see 
when we were going to have falling weather. 
Don't sec much bargain in that, si ranger.' 
— Chicago News. 



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PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



HIT OR MISS 

M<rs. Marion Craig-Wentworth of 
Boston read her play, "The Flower 
Shop", in that city last Thursday. 
She is .coming to Los Angeles in 
March and will read "An Enemy of 
the 'People", by Henrik Ibsen, and 
"Monna Vanna", by Maeterlinck, at 
Cumnock Hall. Mrs. Wentworth has 
received the highest praise from 
critics and her readings here will 
doubtless cause much enthusiasm. 
She is a sister of Miss Alice E. Craig 
of Pasadena. 



Rev. Dana W. Bartlett has left the 
city on a lecture tour and before he 
returns he will visit Washington, iD. 
C, where he hopes to offer sugges- 
tions for a better distribution of the 
newly arrived immigrants throughout 
the country and aid this work as far 
as an informal discussion of the sub- 
ject may affect the destination in the 
new world of the incoming settlers. 



Prof. W. R. Baumgardt will begin 
a course of illustrated lectures in 
Symphony Hall, Jan. 31, with a talk 
on Naples. He will refer to the re- 
cent earthquake and the region which 
has suffered so terribly during the 
last month. For the student of Italian 
history the unhappy city of Messina 
has a secondary interest, in that it 
was the scene of the frightful bom- 
bardment and massacre which won 
for the Bourbon brute Ferdinand II 
the nickname of "Bomba." The re- 
cent earthquake was mrecy itself in 
comparison with the atrocities which 
the troops of that base creature per- 
petrated upon the wretched men, 
women and children of the city. As 
for Messina itself only a third of it 
was left when at last the bombard- 
ment ceased. 



Mr. W. G. Halstead, who has been 
absent from Los Angeles for the last 
twelve years, has returned to the city 
within the past fortnight and will 
build himself a home on Boyle 
Fleights where he proposes to reside 
permanently in the future. In the 
early days lie had charge of the 
Nadeau property and later he wa5 
connected with the Banning com- 
pany. While away, a great part of his 
time has been spent in Yuba county, 
where he had charge of a large estate. 
Mr. Halstead is well known to the 
pioneer settlers of the city and will 
be cordially welcomed by them as a 
genial fellow citizen. 



Musical circles will be interested in 
the fact that Mr. Harold B. Wrenn is 
■ settled permanently in Pasadena, 
where he has opened a brokerage of- 
fice in the Hotel Green. Mr. Wrenn 
is a violinist of unusual talent. He 
has traveled extensively abroad where 
he received the best of training. His 
father is John H. Wrenn, who is at 
the head of a well established broker- 
age bouse of Chicago and New York 
which has long been widely and 
favorably known. 



struct a concrete pipe line to the fac- 
tory in Glendale, near Phoenix. The 
contract for this work has just been 
awarded to Mr. Arthur S. Bent of 
this city by Mr. R. W. Davie, the vice 
president of the company, who has a 
residence here and at Ocean Park. 
Mr. Bent will leave for Arizona next 
week to look over the ground. The 
long experience of Mr. Bent in this 
line of work is an assurance that the 
new system will be constructed in the 
best possible manner. , 



"Cirvalry; A Story ri Several 
Lives", is a play by Mr. Alfred Allan 
which was read before the Ebell Club 
some weeks ago. It is being re- 
hearsed now and Mr. Allan. hopes to 
have it produced in the neighborhood 
of Los Angeles by Feb. 7, and later 
at the Mason. Mr. Wilkes will be in 
the cast. 



Jean Mannheim will give an ex- 
hibition of oil paintings, in the 
Blanchard Hall Studio Building be- 
ginning January 27. He is a native of 
Germany and has lived for twelve 
years in Paris. For five years he 
painted portraits and landscapes in 
and about Denver. Mr. Mannheim 
has just returned from Europe where 
he has been associated with Frank 
Brangwyn in his work. I have been 
told that his paintings, are of excep- 
tional interest. 



Mr. Charles Edson gave a concert' 
in Simpson Auditorium on Wednes- 
day dast which was a great success 
in its object to interest the children 
of the grade schools in music of the 
better sort. The program included 
both classic and modern music. The 
children responded enthusiastically 
and seemed to appreciate this wise 
effort in their behalf. 



Next week is Mad-Year Demonstra- 
tion week at the Young Woman's 
Christian Association. The building 
will reopen to visitors and the public 
is urged to go and see what has been 
accomplished during the last half 
year. 



A. Machner has been showing some 
very curious water color drawings at 
Kanst's gallery this week. The3' pur- 
port to be clairvoyant pictures of pre- 
historic flora. The flowers are more 
singular in form than beautiful. 



The automobile exhibition which is 
to be held at Hamburger's, new build- 
ing on Eighth street beginning this 
Saturday promises to be of great in- 
terest to the fast riding public. 



The Hotel Melrose opened its win- 
ter season Thursday with a dance and 
dinner which was attended and en- 
joyed by a large number of guests. 

Mrs. Annie Mottram Craig, so- 
prano, will be the principal soloist 
at the Caledonian concert which takes 
place next Monday evening. 



The Southwest Sugar and Land 
Company of Phoenix is about to con- 



The Goquelin Club gave a play in 
French at the Gamut :Club last Friday 
which' was well attended. 



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A sn im i v e r § a f I 



im I 



Famous Men for Whom Centenaries May Be Held TKis Year 



student of American his- 

madc th< thai 

.in una ge number oi famous 

men :n ISiW He 

to the ne« it, and not 

ifterward ■ • that the 

centenaries of these men tx 

into the public prints. The lis 

>i who. had they lived. 
I have celebrated the hundredth 

anniversary of their births in 1909 in- 
dftar Allan Poe, 
ild. Alfred Tern 
and Oliver Wendell Holmes ; such mu- 
sicians and comopsers as Felix Men- 

Im-Bartholdy and Fredi 
Francois Chopin; such statesmen a • 
Abraham Lincoln and William Ewan 
Gladstone, and such scientists as 
Charles Robert Darwin. Three other 
anniversaries are thrown in for good 
measure. They are the 400th anniver- 
of the birth of John Calvin, the 
200th anniversary of the birth of Dr. 
Samuel Johnson and the centennial of 
the death of Josef Haydn. 

The first anniversary was that of 
Toe. who was born January 19, 1809. 
in Boston. Among the features of 
the celebration taking place Tuesday 
i- week were the dedication of a 
bronze statue in Poe Park, opposite 
am College, readings and reci- 
tations from Poe's works in public 
ols, lectures on the poet and his 
ks in the public lecture courses 
and commemorative exercises in New 
York University, which is near the 
Fordham home of Poe and the aque 
duct, which was his favorite walk. 

Professor Trent, of Columbia Uni- 
versity, will give an address before the 
Author's Club at a memorial meet- 
ing to be held on January 28. The 
erection of a memorial at West Point 
has been proposed by friends of the 
United States Military Academy and 
admirers of the poet. Poe was a cadet 
at the academy for six months. His 
relatively brief period of study at the 
newly founded University of Virginia 
will doubtless be celebrated by appro- 
priate exerci 

The second anniversary is that of 
Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy, who 
was born on February 3, at Hamburg, 
lie was the son of a cultured Jewish 
merchant and the grandson of the 
Jewish scholar Moses Mendelssohn. 
The father of the musician used to 
say in jest: "Formerly I was the sou 
of my father, but now I am the father 
of my son" It is probable that the 
anniversary of the musical lion of 
his time will b< recognized in different 
parts of the world by the performance 
of some of his musical works, such as 
oratorios of "Elijah" and "St. 
Paul- 
Nine days after the famous son of 



-lian family of Ger- 
many was born in Hamburg two men 

names will lone be bom 
the roster of thi gr< al ones 

first saw the light on opposite 
of the Atlantic. One was Abraham 
Lincoln, born in a settler's cabin in 
Hardin County. Ky.. ami 

bert I'arwin. who was 
born in the home of an English rec- 
tor in Shrewsbury. It is probable 
that Congress will provide for a na- 
tional memorial of Lincoln, mil that 
the 100th anniversary of his birth will 
observed as a national holiday 
There is a bill before the California 
Legislature making the day a legal 
holiday. Lincoln's birthplace is to be 
preserved. In many cities commemo- 
rative exercises will be held in 
churches, halls and schools. A gen- 
eral committee, including among it; 
members many persons associated 
with Lincoln and his assassination in 
a personal manner, has been appointed 
to arrange for an appropriate celebra- 
tion in New York. At Springfield, 
111., where Lincoln was buried, there 
will be addresses by Ambassador 
Bryce of England. Ambassador Jus- 
serand of France, Senator Dolliver, of 
Iowa, and William J. Bryan on Feb- 
ruary 12. 

The anniversary of the man respon- 
sible for the theory of evolution as an 
explanation of the origin of the var- 
ious forms of life instead of the su- 
pernatural theory previously held will 
he widely celebrated by scientific so- 
cieties in more than one country. Pos- 
sibly reports on the recent discovery 
of a skull in France which, apparently, 
has been buried since the glacial per- 
iod and which seems to approximate 
the theoretical "missing link" in its 
characteristics, will figure in the cele- 
bration of the 100th anniversary of 
Darwin and the fiftieth anniversary of 
the first publication of his "Origin of 
Species" in 1859. 

The Darwin family is an interesting 
study in the problem of heredity. 
Erasmus Darwin, the grandfather of 
Charles, who lived between the years 
1731 and 1802, was clearly the fore- 
runner of his famous grandson. He 
anticipated much that Charles himself 
advanced to the point of general ac- 
ceptance. His theories attracted much 
attention and some opposition at the 
time they were advanced. Two of 
Charles Darwin's sons have acquired 
distinction, one as a botanist and the 
other as a geologist and mathemati- 
cian. Darwin, who was warmhearted 
and a brilliant conversationalist, was 
punctilious regarding details. Al- 
though, owing to poor health, 
he was able to work only 
a few hours a day, he always 
attended personally to his voluminous 
correspondence. Every letter was an- 



swered by himself in person, even i ■• 
lung man who wa i 
called upon to prepare a lyceum lec- 
ture and wrote to him for an ab 

tatemenl o hi views be 

the writer had nol time 

td his books. He died April 19, 

1882, full of years and honors, and 

was one of three of those of 1809 to 

find burial in Westminster Abbey. 

The first day of March will mark 
the 100th anniversary of F'rederic 
Francois Chopin. He was born in 
Zelazowa, near Warsaw, Poland. His 
name is one of many that have added 
to the fame and glory of the proud 
spirited Polish people. A consider- 
able portion of his life was spent in 
Paris, for he could not bear to re- 
turn to Warsaw after it fell into the 
ruthless hands of the Russian.;. 
Brought up among cultured people 
of aristocratic society, he inherited a 
liking for fashionable life. In the 
course of his career he came into 
contact with a circle of men and 
women whose names have become a 
part of the literary and musical his- 
tory of the world. Among them were 
Liszt, Heine, Berlioz, Merimee, Mey- 
erbeer, Balzac, De Musset, Dumas and 
George Sand. Chopin is looked upon 
by many .as the emancipator of the 
pianoforte from the thraldom of the 
orchestral style of composition. He 
died October 7, 1849, from consump- 
tion, the germs of which disease de- 
veloped in the course of eleven days in 
July. 1837, which covered his first 
visit to England. On the day of 
Chopin's death Edgar Allan Poe 
breathed his last in Baltimore, on the 
other side of the Atlantic. Chopin 
was -the second in point of age of 
the famous group of 1809 to die, the 
first being Mendjelssohn, who died 
two years earlier, at the age of thirty- 
eight years. Chopin was in his forty- 
first year. 

One day in 1859 a certain personage 
by the name of Whiteley Stokes was 
walking along the streets of London. 
He paused in front of a book shop, 
being a lover of books, to look at the 
bargains offered in the stalls of the 
dealer outside his doors. Fingering 
over the booklets in the penny box 
he came upon a brown covered pam- 
phlet which had originally been pub- 
lished at five shillings, but which, ap- 
parently, had met with such a poor 
reception that it had fallen to the level 
of the penny box. The pamphlet con- 
tained quatrains from the Persian of 
Omar Khayyam translated into En- 
glish by an anonymous writer. In- 
vesting a penny. Stokes took the pam- 
phlet home. After reading it he passed 
it on to Dante Gabriel Rossetti. who 
in turn read it and passed it on to 
Swinburne. All seemed to think that 
the verses were poetry of a high or- 



der, and spread the knowledge, it 
was discovered that the translation 

II known n • lu e I 
ward FitzGerald, who two years prc- 

I had offered s< >mi ol the li 
w ii ked" oi the quatrains to "Frazer's 
Magazine." The editor failing (o 

iiize their merit, they did m il 
I" mi in that publication, and FitzGer- 
ald, tired of scanning the pages for 
them, gave them to his publisher, Mr 
Quaritch, who issued them in the fivi 
shilling pamphlet. FitzGerald wai 
bom on March 31, 1809, at Bredfield 
House, near the market town of 
Woodbridge, in Suffolk. He died on 
June 14, 1883, at Merton Rectory, Nor- 
folk, and was buried at Boulge. 

The next anniversary following that 
of FitzGerald is that of the death of 
Josef Haydn, which occurred in Vien- 
na on May 31, 1809. Haydn was born 
at Rohrau, Lower Austria, March 31, 
1732. He therefore lived ten years 
longer than George Washington, who 
was born a month earlier than him- 
self. A man of gentle spirit and un- 
failing good humor, his career had in 
it much fighting against untoward 
conditions. His father was a travel- 
ing wheelwright, with a natural love 
of music. He expected his boy to en- 
ter the Church, but the latter's apti- 
tude for music led to a cousin taking 
him into his home for instruction 
His hard luck began early. A student 
in the choir school connected with the 
great church of St. Stephen's, in Vi- 
enna, from the age of eight to eigh- 
teen, he was wretchedly poor and 
often without sufficient food. His 
voice changing at the age of eighteen, 
and being therefore useless for the 
time, the choirmaster made the boyish 
prank of cutting off a fellow pupil's 
queue an excuse for dismissing him 
A former chorister whom he met took 
him in. and a kind hearted tradesman 
lent him 150 florins, which he after- 
wardward repaid with good measure. 
When twenty-six years old his cir- 
cumstances changed for the better 
and he fell in love. The object of 
iiis affections, however, decided to 
enter a convent, and her father, La- 
ban-like, persuaded him to marry the 
oldest sister instead. by way of 
recompense. She did not appreciate 
him. She tore up his manuscripts for 
curl papers and pie form, squandered 
his earnings for finery, and even se- 
lected a house to be occupied by her 
when her kind hearted husband should 
shuffle off the mortal coil and leave 
her a widow. Fate had something in 
store for the lovable musician, how- 
ever, for she died before her husband, 
and he was the one who occupied the 
house. 

Haydn wrote more than a hundred 
symphonies and nearly as many quar- 
tets, more than a dozen operas, num- 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



erous sonatas, the Austrian national 
anthem, and the oratorios "The Crea- 
tion" and "The Seasons." An inter- 
esting anecdote is told in connection 
with one of his symphonies, the "Ab- 
schieds" ("Farewell";. In 1760 he be 
came kapellmeister to Prince Paul 
Anton Esterhazy. In 1772, while the 
prince was at Esterhaz, his summer 
seat, the members of the orchestra 
asked leave of absence to visit their 
families. This was denied, and they 
decided to leave his service. Never 
was a strike more gracefully and pa- 
thetically begun. Haydn composed 
the "Abschieds" symphony for the oc- 
casion. Toward the close of the sym- 
phony one player after another ex- 
tinguished his candle and went out. 
Finally only one, the violin leader, 
remained. Having played the last 
phrase, he, too, blew out his candle 
and departed. The music and the ac- 
tion of the players moved the prince 
so deeply that he granted their re- 
quest. 

Haydn deeply loved Vienna, his 
adopted city. When it was bombard- 
ed by Napoleon, the third shot caused 
him to fall into convulsions. He died 
on May 31. 

It was on the tenth day of July, 
1509, at Noyon, in Picardy, France, 
that John ;Calvin first saw the light. 
Calvin is credited with the perform- 
ance of several things which have had 
an influence upon history. He sys- 
tematized the doctrine of Protestant- 
ism and organized its ecclesiastical 
discipline. As a religious teacher, a 
social legislator and as a writer he is 
credited with being second to none 
in his age. His theological teachings 
and his new church polity did more 
than all other influences together to 
weld into a whole the scattered forces 
of the Reformation. His teachings 
have had a marked place in the his- 
tory of the United States, especially 
in New England, where the stern 
tenets of his doctrine long held sway. 
Bancroft attributes modern republican 
liberty to the influence of Calvin's 
little republic of Geneva and to Cal- 
vin. Calvinism had a large influence 
in promoting the independence of th? 
United States. Calvin died in Geneva 
on May 27, 1564. 

Alfred Lord Tennyson, like Darwin, 
was a son of a rector of the Estab- 
lished Church of England. He was 
born on August 6, 1809, at Somersby, 
in Lincolnshire. His early life, like 
that of Haydn, was a battle for a live- 
lihood. Mingled with his poverty was 
a romance. In 1836 he fell in love 
with Emily Sarah Sellwood, the sis- 
ter of his brother Charles's wife. The 
smallness of his income from the pro- 
fession of poet was such that there 
was no prospect of marriage in the 
near future. The relatives of the 
young woman forbade her to corre- 
spond with him. Still he clung to his 
art, having no thought of deserting 
poetry. It was not until 1850, four- 
teen years after the beginning of his 
wooing, that he felt .financially able 
to marry. In June of that year ap- 
peared "In Memoriam." In the same 
month he married Miss Sellwood, 
with whom, he said afterward, "the 
peace of God came into my life." It 



was in November of this year that 
he was appointed poet laureate in 
succession to Wordsworth. His 
forty-first year, therefore, was the 
turning point in his fortunes. He 
died on October 6, 1892, at the age 
of eighty-three, and was the second 
of the men of 1S09 to be buried in 
Westminster Abbey. 

Oliver Wendell Holmes, the third 
American of the great group of 1809. 
was born on August 29 beneath the 
classic shades of Harvard, at Cam- 
bridge, Mass. Two different classes 
of persons can celebrate his birth 
with special interest. They are the 
practitioners of medicine, who owe 
him something for his essay on a 
medical subject which had not re- 
ceived proper attention before his 
time, and the guild of authors, for his 
contributions of poems and essays. 
The graceful conversationalist, "The 
Autocrat," died on October 7, 1894, in' 
Boston, in his eighty-sixth year, al- 
most the last of his great generation. 

Dr. Samuel Johnson was born in 
Lichfield September 18, 1709. He was 
another of the geniuses of recent cen- 
turies who' have found that the arts 
are poor paymasters. The celebrated 
lexicographer, essayist, critic and 
conversationalist tasted deeply of the 
experiences of the men who occupy 
the City Hall Park benches. He was 
once arrested for debt. The story of 
the writing of "Rasselas" in the even- 
ings of a single week for the purpose 
of paying the expenses of his 
mother's funeral is a familiar one. His 
edition of Shakespeare is still pub- 
lished, and his dictionary has re- 
ceived the anathema of the simplified 
spellers as being the vehicle by means 
of which much of the ponderous and 
unphonetic spelling of the English 
language was fastened upon succeed- 
ing generations of users. Dr. John- 
son's latter days were passed in com- 
fort, and when he died in London, on 
December 13, 1784, at the age of 
seventy-five years, his body was 
buried in Westminster Abbey. 

The last of the group of 1809 to en- 
ter the scene, and also the last to 
leave it, was William Ewart Glad- 
stone. He came very near not getting 
into this great year, for he was born 
on December 29. Liverpool was the 
city of his birth. He was born with 
a silver spoon in his mouth, his father 
being a wealthy merchant, a Mem- 
ber of Parliament and a baronet. The 
"Great Commoner" was a Member of 
Parliament for more than half a cen- 
tury and four times Premier, finishing 
his career in this office by winning a 
fight in the House of Commons on 
the Home Rule bill, in 1894, when 
eighty-five years old. He died on 
May 19, 1898, in the eighty-ninth year 
of his age, and was buried in States- 
man's Corner. Westminster Abbey. 
+ * * 

A physician was once arguing with his 
lawyer friend concerning the personal 
characteristics of one of the latter's 
clients. "It's no use," he said finally, 
"you can't make an angel out of a man." 

"No, that's so, I can't," rejoined the 
other with feeling. "We have to leave 
that for you doctors." — Christian Regis- 
ter. 



Identified 

Salesman (in department store) — 
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madam? 

Mrs. Henning (looking for husband) 
— O, did you see him? Which way did 
he go? 



CHvircK Rivalry- 
First Servant Girl with (just pride) 
— We have mattings at our church. 

Second Servant Girl (even wit/i 
more pride) — Well, we've a fine strip 
of linoleum up the aisle, and the vicar 
burns insects every Sunday. 




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PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



Recalls John Brown's Raid 



arsenal at 

helium 

than 
Itimorc and 
1 1 the ferrj 
mi dut 

. I knew John Brown very 
well," said Mr Higgins when reci 

l event, "but it 
lerably ahead ol 
fer to him as 
tin- middle 
March, 1858. a man giving his nan 
John Smith — Captain John Smith — 
came t" Harper's Ferry and procured 
iccommodations over at 
H'>.,k. I was at that time em- 
ployed as a watchman on the old 
wooden bridge at the Ferry, and board- 
ed also in Sandy Hook, a lew 
from 'Captain Smith.' Naturally i got 

- od hit of the 'captain, 
he told me he was a prospector wh i, 
had come to Harper's Ferry in the 
hope of discovering valuable mineral. 
in the surrounding mountains M 
used to carry a pick with him. and 
would frequently take long strolls, and 
I remember upon two different occa- 
sions that lie showed me manganese 
which he claimed to have obtained 
here, and also some silver, which he 
likewise said he found in the vicinity. 
"Of course, we people of the lo- 
cality were very much interested in 
'Captain Smith's' pretended discovery 
and he said he intended opening some 
mines. Later he rented the Kennedy 
farm, over on the Antrctam road. 
about six miles from Harper's Ferry, 
and said it was his aim to start at 
in . on his mining venture. Shortly 
after moving into the Kennedy prop- 
erty he bought a horse and small wag- 
on, and pretty soon 'Captain Smith' 
began receiving — almost daily — boxes 
from the depot, explaining that it was 
mining machinery. But from the 
length of these mysterious boxes I 
have since come to believe that they 
contained the rifles, revolvers, etc., 
which he afterward used on his attack- 
on the arsenal. This win! on in 
some lime, of course, and residents 
suspected nothing to In- wrong. 

"But. as I have said, I was em- 
ployed watching I he bridge, and be- 
fore a greal while, and during the 
summer, a number of strangers came 
over the bridge and inquired from mi- 
whether 1 knew 'John Smith' who 
lived in the neighborhood and to di- 
rect them there. These men usually 
line at intervals of about a week, 
always alone, and, as I later learned, 
were the men who comprised 'Captain 
Smith'-' following in his attack on the 
arsenal. 
•'Historian- ha n I i tti dly written 

that the ins ion was created by 

negroes, but this is entirelj ini orrecl 
and there were not more than three 
negroes in the party. I personall: 



saw the men wl 
and with 01* 

nan 

"Employed with me in watc 

the old railroad hri.L tl the 

ferry was a man named William Wil- 
liams, ami we relieved each other at 
:r intervals. The railroad then 
time clock on the bridge and we 
were required to register every thirty 
minute-. On Saturday night; I', 
1859, I remember it well. I was 
to report at midnight, but William - 
and 1 never quarreled with each other, 
i: one happened to be a few min 
late. On this night I arrived at I he 
tt 12:20 and v ised to 

find that Williams wasn't their and 
had not registered on th< .toil since 

"1 immediately started back aero-. 
the bridge in search of him and was 
accosted on my way by two armed 
strangers, this being the first intima- 
tion I had of the siege. 1 was com- 
manded by the men to 'halt.' hut not 
being familiar with military life, didn't 
obey \fiiT my failure to -top oil the 
second command I was struck in the 
side by a bayonet and rendered al- 
mn.l unconscious by the blow. Re- 
gaining my feet. I asked the reason 
for molestation and told them I was 
the watchman on the bridge. 'Well.' 
answered the man that I afterward 
learned was John Brown's son Oliver, 
'we will watch the bridge tonight — 
you come with us.' 

"As we started back across tne 
bridge I saw several long spears and 
was almost frantic from fear. T struck 
young Brown a powerful blow with 
my fist, knocked him down and made 
my escape. In those day 1 was a 
swift runner, and scared as I was, v 
lost no time in getting back into th? 
town. 

"The railroad company's agent at 
Harper's Ferry at that time was Foun- 
tain Becklin who was also the mayor 
of the town. He had a negro by the 
name Hayward Sheppard, whom he 
had freed some time before and em- 
ployed around the station, and Shep- 
pard slept in the building. After 
making my escape from the bridge I 
awoke the negro and told him what 
had taken place. I discovered that a 
bullet had slightly grazed my head, 
but proceeded to Williams' house to 
see if he had returned home. Mr-. 
Williams told me he had not; so, not 
wanting to frighten her, I said I had 
jnsl come over to see him about my 
lantern. 

"About this time the Western Ex- 
press was due from Cincinnati, so I 
returned to the station. She was on 
time that night, 1 remember well, and 
reached the ferry ai 1 :26. The eon 
ductor in charge of her was 'Jake Phil 
lip-, and 1 cautioned him not to cross 
the bridge with his train as it had 
(,ei n besieged and such action would 
be dangerous. 'Jake' was a large an I 
powerful man— typical railroader of 
the lime — who didn't know the mean- 
ing of the word fear. He took his 



1 the 

join him. 
While 1 

went 

We weit fired at bj 
mgli I am 

they 

Ulan ' 

In. 

the ns< of firearms, b aider! 

irther, 
. they wanted liberty and ! 
w a- only some negroes fightin \ 

i m. 



and 
shortl ipard, 

the negro, ventured out and wa- 
in I K 

ligiou 

■ , . . 

en prisoni rs, thi id thi 

father on Smith' 

to tell Phillips to ] 

li'. on 

"lln un ssage w a- t.. the effect Mm; 



The Misses Page 
Boarding and Day School 



Primary — Preparatory — High 

Single Management but Separate 



in 



School 

Location 



FOR BOYS 

137 West Adams Street 

Telephone Home 21203 

A spiendid home for boys and 
also a well regulated school- 
home where the character train- 
ing of the boy is given the im- 
portance it deserves. The pro- 
verb "Train up the child in the 
way he should go; and when 
he is old he will not depart from 
it," is exemplified at this school. 
Boys here are taught manliness, 
obedience, punctuality, industry 
and learning in a way fitting 
them suitably as foundation 
stones for life's progress- Boys 
of any age after 5 years ad- 
mitted. Each boy is held to be 
an individual. Not being held 
back by class restrictions his 
progress is rapid and certain. 
Boys in addition to the regular 
school studies of our girls 
school are taught sloyd, mili- 
tary drill, vocal and instrumen- 
tal music, also the languages. 
The military department is in 
charge of Captain Robert A. 
Gibbs. 

The school has athletic field 
where boys -are taught sports 
and military drill. 

William Himrod, graduate of 
Pomona College and Champion 
mile runner of Pacific coast, is 
in charge of boys' play and 
athletics. 

Call, Telephone or Write for Catalogue 

Pupils Admitted at Any Time 



FOR GIRLS 

243 West Adams Street 

Home Phone 21202 
Sunset Sonth 3539 



Located like boys' school in one 
of most aristocratic residence 
sections of Los Angeles. The 
buildings are well adapted to a 
girls' school; wide verandas, 
upper balconies and beautiful 
grounds, set out to semi-tropical 
shrubbery. Miss Emma E. Page 
and Miss Delia M. Page, prin- 
cipals of these schools, are from 
Fliram College, Ohio, and both 
are Normal graduates. Miss 
Clara J. Armstrong, principal of 
the high school department, is 
a graduate of Oswego Slate 
Normal School, New York, a 
teacher whose exceptional abil- 
ity and experience along general 
educational lines is well known 
and established. 

Girls here are taught vocal 
and instrumental music, drawing 
and painting, physical culture, 
elocution; these in addition to 
regular school studies. 

Ample facilities are afforded 
for recreation and the girls' 
home training and moral wel- 
fare is attended to in a manner 
to bring out the sweet and beau- 
tiful in character, so essential to 
true womanhood. 



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Top Floor Grant Building Fourth and Broadway 



10 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



the idea was not to molest the rail- 
road 'or delay the United States mail. 
Still Phillips refused to move his train 
during the night, and it was not until 
7 o'clock Monday morning, when 
'Captain Smith' himself had come and 
assured Phillips that no harm woulir 
befall the train, that it resumed its 
journey east. 

"The abolitionists held the arsenal 
all day Monday, the 17th of October," 
continued Mr. Higgins, "and kept th: 
village in a state of terror. On Mon- 
day afternoon the negro, Sheppard. 
who had been wounded the previous 
night, appeared to be dying and plead- 
ed with me to give him a drink of 
water. The poor fellow's sufferings 
were so agonizing that I determined 
to risk going for water, starting for 
the Shenandoah River with a pitcher. 

"I was halted, as expected, by a 
son-in-law of 'Smith' named Thomp 
son, who, on learning my mission, 
bade me get the negro the water. He 
made a remark, however, that has 
caused me to ponder many, man 3 
times during these years since. As 
I returned from the river with the 
water he said: 

" 'It serves the negro right, and if 
he had listened and taken our advice 
he would not have been shot.' 

"From this I am certain Hayward 
Sheppard was approached and asked 
to join in the uprising, which he like. 
ly declined and was threatened with 
death in the event he told. 

"On Tuesday, Oct. 18, a company of 
United States marines from Washing- 
ton, under command of Colonel Rob- 
ert E. Lee, afterward the great con- 
federate leader, and Major Green, ar- 
rived at Sandy Hook by freight train 
over the Baltimore and Ohio and 
marched to the ferry prepared to take 
possession of the government arsenal. 
Major Green advanced toward the fort 
waving a white handkerchief, went In 
side and had a consultation with the 
raiders. Returning from the fort he 
came over to where I was standing 
alongside of Colonel Lee and said: 

" 'Colonel, those raiders in there are 
commanded by old Osawatomie 
Brown of Kansas and he refuses to 
surrender.' 

"Then it was that the real identity 
of 'Captain Smith' was learned. The 
order was given to charge on the fort, 
and after the third attack Brown and 
his men were captured. Eleven of 
these were killed in the encounter and 
were buried, including Brown's oldest 
son Oliver, along the .Shenandoah 
River. Brown and the remainder of 
his men were taken on tbe first train 
to Cbarlestown, the county seat, were v 
tried and executed without delay. 

"I shall never forget that eventful 
2d of December, 1859, when John 
Brown was hanged at Charlestown," 
said Mr. Higgins. "His remains were 
brought here and met by bis widow 
and a man by the name of Tindale. 
from Philadelphia, who afterward 
came to the ferry as a major in the 
Twenty-eiglith Pennsylvania Infan- 
try. Brown's remains were taken back 
to his old home in New England to 
their last resting place, many miles 
away from the banks of the peaceful 



Shenandoah and the dreamy little 
town he immortalized by his fanati- 
cism in the cause of abolition." 

"Pat" Higgins remained in the em 
ploy of the Baltimore and Ohio con- 
tinually from 1853 until his retire- 
ment April 1, 1897. He is now enjoy- 
ing the comforts of a cozy home at 
Sandy Hook, but can .be seen almost 
daily at Harper's Ferry walking the 
platform of the unpretentious little- 
station, whistling a tune of ante-bel- 
lum days, shaking hands with the pas- 
sengers on the rear of an express and 
telling reminiscences of the days when 
"all wasn't quiet along tne Potomac 
and John Brown, prospector, farmer 
and abolitionist, was inciting the ig- 
norant negroes of the vicinity into a 
demonstration which may be said 
practically to mark the opening of the 
civil war. 

* * * 
Modern Antiquities 

There is an abundance of Adam's 
apples about town to which no one 
pays any particular attention. But 
were the original Adam's apple of 
paradisiacal fame or even the core of 
it procurable no doubt every museum 
would desire to possess it and cheer- 
fully bid a king's ransom to: giet it. 
Relics of the dead have a cash value. 
Time is money today, and time is 
more money if by chance it was im- 
pressed on a canvas two or three cen- 
turies ago. Love for antiquities is too 
often a supernumerary passion which 
lends itself to fraud. 

There are painters in Europe who 
can copy anything with admirable 
skill. Their copies are made on old 
canvases mounted on a frame work 
of solid wood. Then by an ingenious 
process decades are compressed into 
days, and pictures made to day are 
aged to suit any century. Their past 
is made to order. A certain kind of 
varnish gives a ripe golden tone, and 
a deepening! of shadows with the sug- 
gestion of soil of centuries is had by 
the smearing of licorice juice. As for 
the cracked paint surface — sure sign 
of age — that is obtained by baking the 
picture carefully in an oven or by lay- 
ing a plaque of metal on the canvas 
and striking it gently with a hammer. 

Wormholes in frame or panel are 
merely a matter of fine shot fired in 
and afterward picked out, and fly- 
specks to deceive the flies themselves 
may 'be had by the judicious spatter 
of Indian ink. 

These fictitious masterpieces of 
yesterday may seem a little hard and 
cold, but they pass muster and even 
find places on the walls of important 
galleries, it is said. It is claimed, for 
instance, that Rembrandt's portrait of 
Sobieski in the Louvre is not the 
original at all, but only a copy, the 
original being in Russia. 

Henri Rochefort is quoted in "Suc- 
cess" as saying that there is "no langer 
such a thing as an honest art dealer 
in the European market; or if some 
exceptional dealer happens to be hon- 
est he is sure to be incompetent." 
When asked about the art experts 
Rochefort declared that they were 
worse than the dealers. 

"Why should they know anything 



about art?" he said. "They are stable 
boys today, art experts tomorrow. 
One of the most successful art experts 
in Paris was a bill poster a few years 
ago. Any one may be an expert who 
chooses to put up a sign. There are 
no qualifications, no diplomas. A man 
simply calls himself an art expert and 
that settles it. And these are the fel- 
lows you rich Americans deal with." 

* * * 

-A. Remedy for Snachs 

A woman went into a drug store 
the other day and complained to the 
clerk that she was not feeling well. 
Her appetite, she said, was not good. 

Clerk: "If you will tell me what is 
the matter, madame, perhaps I can 
suggest a remedy." 

Woman : "I eat three meals a day, 
all right, but I don't seem to be able 
to eat anything between meals." 

:Clerk: "You lack nerve only, 
madame. Let me give you a bottle of 
nerve tonic." 

* * * 

Robbie (at the opera) — Mamma, 
what does papa keep going out be- 
tween the acts for? 

Mother — Sh! He goes out for 
opera glasses. — Judge. 




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11 




AMUSEMENTS 

"The Wolf" at the Mason 

In Eugene Walter's romai 
drama, "The Wolf", he ha 

isible from the sliding I [ar- 
lem Flat atmosphere and it* sordid, 
ill >; i. .illy interesting, 
city types of "Paid in Full". For ad 
tge picture shows the 
Canadian woods on a morning in 
ing Indian summer, and Andrew 
MacTavish's log house, with pelts 
I 
ire arc just six people in the 
■ iturallj < nous h in a sti iry 
of the Hudson Bay country, only one 
of thi man. The characters 

il distinctly drawn (whether 
truthfully or consistently need not be 
laps, since trie play is 
frankly a melodrama) and they con- 
trast vividly. MacTavish is a Scot 
of the old school, who swears by God 
i lie kirk, worships money, and 
his native land and not much 
else, — not even Hilda, his flaxen- 
haired daughter; Jules is a French 
lian, — elemental, virile and 
tig, — to whom the forest is at once 
a home and a comrade: McDonald is 
a successful hard-working American 
ineer, whose recreation is the be- 
trayal of innocent women "When 
iman cea >es to be innocent she 
- to be interesting," is bis ex- 
planation of bis successive amoiirs, 
Huntly, McDonald's assistant, is an 
"amusing cuss' whose unconscious 
witticisms lighten up the sombre 
progress of the play: and Batiste is a 
I ludsi " 1 1 .nil . a silent, melancholy. 

i aibc creature, who is as relent 

less as Nature her 

As played ibis week at the Mason, 
"The Wi ilf" 1 1 1 1 iHv ii.i - :i fair chance, 
since Li irle Palmer n In i plays I tilda, 
tlu ■ cn'rl aboul whom the action oi the 
piece revolves, is utterly and tire- 
somely inadequate. She has neither 
youth nor temperament and both are 
indispensable to a portrayal of thi- 
lonely, impressionable, imaginativi 
child of the northern woods. There 
are in:i n\ telling Imi - and -i rong situ- 
atii ms, and crud I hou ?h it is the pla 
verges upon poetry at times. In the 
last act the silent struggle, just a : 



Homer I). Mason 'as "Mac" in "A 

Stubborn Cinderella" Mason 

Opera House Next Wi,ek 



nightfall, between the two strong men, 
their dark figures silhouetted against 
the shimmering river, is unique and 
powerful; and more expressive than 
words is the sigh which the con- 
queror, Jules, gives just as the cur- 
tain falls. 



"Charley's Aunt" 

The Belasco Theater has been filled 
this week by an almost continuous 
ripple of laughter. The absurdities 
of "Charley's Aunt" never fail to call 
Forth the merriest response from the 
audience. Mr. Richard Vivian has 
been seen in this play before. He is 
admirable in it and as funny as can 
be. Mr. Howard Scott, also, has a. 
congenial part as Spettigue, of which 
lie makes the most. Mr. Ben Graham 
seemed a somewhat reluctant come- 
dian this week, but the piece as a 
whole was given with great spontane- 
ity and vivacity. The setting of the 
stage for the last act was most har- 
monious in color, a great improve- 
ment over some of the recent scenery. 
The women in the play were given 
with a light and suitable touch. Miss 
Fay Bainter. appearing at this bouse 
for the first time in the role of Amy 
Spettigue, did well in her assumption 
of I lie airs and graces of a partly 
grown up young lady. For a hearty 
laugh, without malice, go to the Be- 
1. isc i w"hile .Charley's aunt may be 
seen there. 



wrought. For Cinderella is now a 
sophisticated rather self-conscious 
small person, who talks about water- 
wagons and "bats", her Fairy-queen 
Godmother is an Amazonian young 
woman with a tendency to sing off- 
key, and the prince is a buxom, 
decollete contralto, with a straight 
front and spangles, French heels and 
an elaborate architectural coiffure.. 
The two wicked sisters are grotesque 
caricatures who indulge in unlimited 
horse-play, and the sylphs and fairies 
try to look like a comic opera chorus. 
Mr. Ben Sellar's song. "I'm so lazy", 
was the best hit in the first act. The 
sword dance by Miss Swan Wood in 
a costume of silver gauze blent with 
lavender and blue, was the feature oi 
the second. The big Auditorium or- 
gan, manipulated by Bruce Gordon 
Kingsley, displayed a range of orches- 
tral combinations really amazing. 
The final ballet was received with 
hearty applause. 



was particularly good as Fugi, an 
oriental imitating the stiffness in 
western good breeding. Mr. Desmond 
look the part of a young diplomat 
with ease. His stage carriage has 
gained in grace of manner during his 
stay at the Burbank and be now plays, 
the part of a man of the world much 
better than formerly. His Charles 
Morton was reassuring, for it shows 
the evolution of his art. Miss Hall 
was exceedingly attractive as Koh- 
amma San, infusing both charm and 
force into the part. The third act 
gave 'her a chance to display her tal- 
ents, and they are considerable, at 
their best. Mr. Mcstayer bad little 
to do, but be was carefully disguised 
and added much to the oriental illu- 
Siion of the piece. For some reason 
the last act seemed western. One 
forgot that one was supposed to be in 
Japan except for the interesting 
scene between Kobamma San and the 
leper. I believe that it is a mistake 
for Miss Hall to appear with un- 
kempt hair in this act. It seems otll 
of keeping, somehow. It makes the 
sacrifice of Kobamma San seem 
slatternly, an aspect of the case which 
the audience ought not to feel for a 
moment. 



"Cinderella" 
People who went to see Cinderellr 
ai the Auditorium, and took their 
children, expecting to find the quaint. 
simple, familiar old story made into 
a play, must have been rather sur- 
prised by the changes Time has 



A Drama of Modern Japan 
It speaks well for the versatility o( 
the Burbank company that having 
given a lurid melodrama last week 
they were able, with great success 
this week, to interpret so poetical a 
play as "The Heart of a Geisha". 
The stage pictures were beautiful 
and the gowning of the Japanese 
girls was very artistic. In fact they 
made the only two American cut 
dresses which were seen in the play 

I k common-place. Tin acti 

the cast were well made up and as- 
sumed the gestures and deportment of 
orientals with surprising skill. Mr. 
Byron Beasley gave a restless and 
cunning nobleman in a manner not 
soon forgotten. Mr. Charles Giblyu 



Corinne as "Lola" 
Corinne is an easy 'going, merry 
and magnetic young woman who 
dominates the stage this week at the 
Majestic. With the exception of Mark- 
Sullivan and po.ssibly Hazel Carlton 
there is no one else in the cast who 
contributes a great deal to the suc- 
cess of the play. "Lola from Berlin" 
is a comedy intended to make an idle 
evening slip away as easily as pos 
sible, a purpose which it fulfills g] 
fully enough. Corinne is the ce 
of attraction throughout and trie 
changes of costume are frequent 
tgh to please the mosl exacting 
fancy for Huff- and ruffles, Mr. Sul- 
livan's song, "None of Them's 
\riv thing on M e' . with 

much versatility. 

IN. 

Puppet Shows in China 
In China theater plays are divided 
into two great classes. The first deals 



12 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



entirely with historical subjects, the 
other has to 1 do with comedies and 
tragedies of every day life. In the 
history of the present Chinese drama 
there is a universal consensus of opin- 
ion that the puppet shows, which are 
still most popular throughout the em- 
pire, were the original from which it 
has sprung. Before the beginning of 
any play the audience is treated to a 
puppet show display, not because it 
is part of the programme, but as a 
memorial tribute to the great China- 
men of ancient times. Those men had 
the inventive genius, and also the 
goodness of .heart, to employ their 
great powers in devising a never-end- 
ing source of amusement and enter- 
tainment for the benefit of posterity. 



Another Cinderella 

Next Monday night, at the Mason- 
Opera House, comes the long looked 
for musical play, ''A Stubborn Cin- 
derella", by the authors of "The Time, 
the Place and the Girl", and many- 
other notable musical successes. It 
is under the direction of Mr. Mort H 
Singer, and is headed by Mr. Homer 
B. Mason, the well-known vaudeville 
favorite who since his entry into 
musical comedy has been making a 
record for himself. Hie is ably as- 
sisted by Miss Grace Edmond, in the 
part of Lady Leslie, whose remark- 
able soprano voice has won for her 
a high place in the prima donna role. 

The play is in three acts: the first 
showing the campus of Columbus 
University; the second a railroad 
wreck in the West; the third a view 
of the Natatorium at Hotel Coron- 
ado, at San Diego. The last two arc 
decidedly Californian in tone and 
atmosphere, and the scenery is said 
to be very realistic. The love story 
of "Mac" and Lady Leslie develops 
and culminates in these last two acts,' 
under Southern California skies, and 
will certainly appeal to Los Angeles 
theatergoers. 



Shakespeare at The Majestic 

On Sunday, January 24, Mr, Charles 
B. Hanford will open a week's en- 
gagement at the Majestic Theater in 
a series of Shakespeare's pla} r s. He 
is well known in this city, having ap- 
peared at the Mason Opera House 
several times. His study of Shylock 
is always of interest. Mr. Hanford's 
present company is the result of man;' 
seasons of conscientious observation 
with a view to selecting those playera 
who are best fitted for the roles in- 
cluded in those plays for which he 
contemplates special productions. 
The leading feminine characters in 
the Hanford presentations this season 
will be enacted by the favorite actress. 
Miss Alnrie Drofnah. The arrange- 
ment of Mr. Hanford's repertory at 
the Majestic Theater is as follows; 
On Sunday, Monday and Saturday 
nights, "The Winter's Tale"; Tuesday 
and Friday, "Othello"; Wednesday 
matinee. "Much Ado About Noth- 
ing"; Wednesday night and Saturday 
matinee, "The Merchant of Venice", 
and Thursday night, "The Taming of 
the Shrew". 



A Cracksman at the Burbank 

"Raffles", a drama of criminology 
will be given at the Burbank theater 
next w r eek, the first performance on 
Sunday, (tomorrow) afternoon. The 
play was first presented on the Bur- 
bank stage one year ago this montn, 
proving a popular success. Original- 
ly produced in this country by Kyrle 
Bellew and afterwards played on the 
road by S. Miller Kent, "Raffle.-" 
largely enhanced the fame of both 
actors. The central figure is a gen- 
tleman .thief who steals for the love 
of the game. His keenest joy is the 
excitement which comes from the 
knowledge that Scotland Yard is 
close upon his heels. The play is in 
reality a glorified form of dime novel 
and appeals to the detective spirit 
which is latent in every man who was 
ever young enough to have read "Nick 
Carter". 



The Golden West Again • 

iC'avid Belasco's play "The Girl 
from the Golden West" will be Riven 




Miss Marie Drofnah as "Hermione" 
at the Majestic 

a revival at the Belasco Theater next 
week. It is a drama of the mining 
camps during the early days of the 
gold fever in this state. This play 
was seen at the Belasco last year and 
ran successfully there for eight weeks. 
Owing to the length of the piece the' 
curtain will rise promptly at eight 
o'clock. It is this play which is to 
form the basis of a libretto for a new 
opera which is being composed in 
Italy at the present time by Puccini. 
Lewis S. Stone will again be seen 
in his favorite role of Ramerez the 
gentlemanly highwayman of the play. 
This is one of Mr. Stone's most bril- 
liant dramatic achievements and won 
for him unstinted critical praise as 
well 'as an abundance of enthusiastic 



appraval when the play was previous- 
ly presented at the Belasco Theater. 
Miss Florence Oakley will have a 
chance to test her strength as "The 
Girl", for it is a role which demands 
great force and requires a good deal 
of magnetism in the actress who in- 
terprets it. 

* + * 

MUSIC 



I GROW HAIR. 



The Goodson Concert 

It was the rare pleasure of the 
writer to have heard Katherine Good- 
son play before the class at Prof. 
Leschetizky's in Vienna some ten 
years ago. Her coming had been 
heralded with great joy by the pupils 
for some weeks previous to her ap- 
pearance. This was shortly after her 
first success in the field of concert 
work. On that occasion she played 
the Chopin E Minor Concerto with 
the "old man" himself at the second 
piano. It was one of the treats of 
that season. 

You may be sure there was no un- 
due haste on that occasion; no assert- 
ing of self in interpretation. The 
rules are severe in the Karl Ludwig 
Strasse and dare not be transgressed 
in the manner, even to a casual ob- 
server, too evident at Goodson's con- 
cert on the 15th inst. With all respect 
due such an astonishing technique, 
the result of years of application and 
hard work, one could not help feeling 
she was almost too facile at times and 
lacked poise. This was especially to 
■be remarked in the "Moonlight" Son- 
ata. For, when she s-hould have had 
poise she showed sentimentality and 
a sentimental Beethoven is some- 
thing we do not like to think of; it 
borders on heresy. 

Her marvelous strength of forearm 
showed itself in that exquisitely ren- 
dered Aeolus by Fr. Gernsheim. It 
does not require much strength to 
"make a noise" on the piano but it 
does require colossal strength and 
control of muscles to get smooth- 
ness and sustained demi-teint in such 
a difficult composition. Her best 
work was undoubtedly done in the 
Grieg E Minor Sonata, being, played 
in a truly great manner, and showed 
fine symphonic values, due largely to 
her always-judicious pedaling. 

It is regretable she did not play 
something of Schumann instead of, 
for instance, that A Flat Ballade of 
Chopin. Will we never hear the last 
of it? 

Her gush of tempo and sound left 
one with a feeing of breathlessness, 
wth no new knowledge gained and I 
am sure she could have taught us 
much had she had time and a mind. 

That "coffin", as the old concert 
grand (we believe of the early 8i">'s) 
she played on is called among musi- 
cians, should be replaced by a better 
instrument if the makers wish to be 
pleasingly advertised. It is a coffin 
in which many a hope and nerve has 
been buried. The pedals rattled 
alarmingly the other night and it is 
not too much to say that it amounts 
to an insult to ask an artist like 
Katherine Goodson to play on it. 

T. C. 




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+ ♦ + 
FORTHCOMING EVENTS 
(Jan 2S to Jan 
Theatres Next Week 
Auditorium "Cinderella". 

Girl of the Golden 

Burbank— "Raff 

Grand — "The Wizard o) the Nile". 

Majestic — "Winter's Tale", Mer 
chant of Venice", "Much Ado About 
Nothing", "Taming of tin Shrew", 
"Othello". 

Mason -"A Stubborn Cinderella". 
Exhibitions 

Blanchard Hall Studio Building — 
Jan. 27. Jean Mannheim — Portraits 
and Landscapes. 

Young Woman's Christian \ssocia 
tion. Hill >treet. Jan. 29 and 30 — An- 
nual exhibit of the Keramic Club. 

Hamburger Building — Auto show- 
all next week. 

Meetings and Lectures 

Today (Saturday. Jan. 23.) — City 
Club. Hotel Westminster, 12:15 p. m. 

Sunday, Jan. 24.— Symphony Hall, 
i Recitals by B. G. Kingsley, 
"Tristan and Isolde". 8 p. m. 

Monday, Jan. 25.— Ruskin Art 
R( oms, Lecture by Prof. Hector Al- 
liot. "The Pleiade". 1(1:30 a. m. 

Ebell Club. "The Servant in the 
House"; Mrs. E. T. Wilkes. 2:30 p.m. 

Hoard of Supervisors, 9:30 a. m. 

Board of Public Works, 9 a. m. 

Finance Committee, 10 a. m. 

Water Commission, 3:30 p. m. 

Board of Education, 7:30 p. m. 

Ministerial Union at Y. M. C. A. 
Building, 10 a. m. 

Blanchard Hall, Caledonia Club 
concert, 8 p. m. 

Music Hail. "Malibran", Mrs. Nanno 
Wood. 

Y. W. C. A., Recital by pupils, 8 
p. m, 

Tuesday, Jsn. 26.— The Highland 
Park Ebell Club meets at 10 a. m. 
Short Stories: Miss Cuthbert. 

Board of Supervisors, 9:30 a. m. 

City Council, 1 :30 p. m. 

Police Commission, 2:30 p. m. 

Civil Service .Commission, 4:30p.m. 

Blanchard Hall. Woman's Orches- 
tra rehearsal, 3 p. m. 

Symphony Hall. Lyric Club re- 
hearsal, 2 p, m. 

Gamut Club, Orpheus Club re- 
hearsal, 8 p. m. 

Simpson Auditorium, Ellis Club con- 
cert, 8 p. m. 

Belasco Theatre. Live Stock Asso- 
ciation, 10 a. in. Addresses by Hnn 
A. C. Harper, Hon. G. H. Stewart, 
Hon. J W. Springer of Denver and 
Hon W. A. Harris of Lawrence. 
Kansas. 2 p. m. "Land Laws" by 



Hon J M Cheyene, "Live 

Industry" by Hon S II 
an, "Leco Investigation" bj t 

Marsh of v\ . IV C. K 

Chamber of Commerce, Improve 
ment Association, 8 p. m, 

Y W. C. A . 10 a m. ami 5 p. m., 
\ Dinner for Six." Demonstration 

■ kin i4 Seb 
Wednesday, Jan. 27. — Park Com- 
mission, 10.30 a. ill. 
Playground Commission, 11 a. m. 

Ebell Club, "Religion and Medi- 
cine", Mrs Pleas, 10:30 a. in. 

Ruskin Art Club. "American House 
Building." Mrs. J. \\ Hendrick; Mrs. 
C. J. Flower. 

Belasco Theatre. Live Slock Asso- 
ciation, 10 a. m. "Meat Inspection" 
by Dr. O. E. Dyson .if Chica 'Bi n 

elits of Co-operation" by I. T. Pryor. 
Addresses, Hon. G. Pinchot; E. S. 
Gosney. 2 p. m., ".Conditions in Cali- 
fornia" by Dr. C. M. Haring, "Public 
Grazing Lands" by D. B. Heard, "Fu- 
ture of the Cow-man" by J. C. Under- 
wood. 8 p. m., Athletic contests at 
Y. M. C. A. Building. 

Board of Directors, Chamber of 
Commerce, 2 p. m. 

Thursday, Jan. 28. — Fire Commis- 
sion, 10: 30 a. m. 

Music Hall, Recital; Mrs. Katherine 
Nielson, 2 p. m. 

Belasco Theatre, Live Stock Asso- 
ciation, 10 a. m. General business. 2 
p. m.. automobile ride. 

Y. VV. C. A., Address by Dr. Homer 
Sprague, 8 p. m. 

Friday, Jan. 29. — Supply Committee, 
10 a. m. 

Board of Public Works, 2 p. m. 

Housing Commission, 4:30 p. m. 

Friday Morning Club, Pasmore 
Trio, 10:30 a. m. 

Live Stock Association. 9 a. in,, 
trip to Pasadena. 

South West Society, Hamburger 
Building, 3:30 p. m. 

Bee Keepers' Association, Chamber 
of Commerce. 

Y. W. C. A., Choral Club, 8 p. m. 

Saturday, Jan. 30.— City Club. 

Driving Club matinee at Agricul- 
tural Park, 2. m., to entertain Live 
Stock Association. 

Bee Keepers' Association, Chamber 
of Commerce. 

* * * 

There is no freedom in imperfec- 
tion, in spite of the makeshift conduct 
we menace our days with. A little 
less than well doing is so much easier 
than good performance, and does 
quite as well to advertise our vanity. 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 

LITERARY NOTES 



A truth which is not joyous is par- 
tial. A vision that is not beautiful 
in a nightmare of the senses. 



Judgment is brought about by those 
who need it not. It is the well-fed 
who condemn the bread stealer. 



A substantial indifference to the 
criticisms of others is the best frame- 
work for success. To be passive al- 
ways maddens tweedle-dee-dom. 



By Pbrez l'ni.i. 

In the "Recollections of a Spinster 

Aunt", edited h< 

i.\. Y. Reynolds inn- 

ing passages. As a little girl the spin- 
ster aunt goes to the i rj stal 1 'alai • 
to see the Queen and Prince Ubert 
and their visitors, Louis Napoleon 
and Eugenie. Her criticisms an 

k,n : "I mi,:. Napoleon i- frighl 
ful. and of 'hi ' our Queen i- m t 
the elegant woman that the French 
Empress is, I'm ohl her crinoline I 
It must have been four yards in cir- 
cumference: the Queen is much more 
sensible in her costume. The I'm 
pre - l- most elegant, but probably a 
vain woman and fond of dress." 

\\ ben she grows older she goes to 
the sea and tries to balbe at Lyme 
Regis without the use of the anti- 
quated local bathing machine: "Our 
lodging has a garden and that garden 
ends upon the beach; so we bethought 
us that if we bathed before breakfast 
We should save much dressing and un- 
dressing, and we could walk down to 
the sea through the garden. Our 
party consists — the bathing conting- 
ent — of Mrs. D., her two boys under 
ten, an art student (girl) and we two, 
ditto, ditto. Nothing could be more 
seemly than our attire; bathing cos- 
tumes, really very pretty, blue serge 
trimmed with red braid like the 
French suits; and over all a large 
watreproof cloak. But we had reck- 
oned 'without our host, vested inter- 
ests and British conventionality. 

"We marched down the garden at 
7 a. m., walked across the shore, took 
off our wraps and joyously entered 
the sea. It was a lovely morning, and 
we had a glorious swim. After a 
quarter of an hour or so, we returned 
the same way, very pleased with our- 
selves. But in the afternoon the 
Mayor interviewed Mrs. D. He was 
'very sorry to cause us annoyance', 
etc.. etc. No doubt we were inno- 
cent of any intentional impropriety, 
but Lyme Regis was not France. It 
might be prejudice, but Dorset was 
Dorset and did not like new-fangled 



13 



ople tne same as if we 
■ ;>g' (.there i- onl 
chine), 'which would an ad- 

vantage i" them and i.i 

drawn up, and Mr. Mayor bid us 
. in. . rning. ' lint alas I Ih, 

onger than 
power. Ma'am Grundy tri- 
umphed, ami we had i.. resign our- 
selves i.. the use of the machini . and 
confess ourselves beaten; as Re- 
formers we are feebleness pi 
Bed." 

Vnother incident the young lady 
found even more characteristic of 
Dorset than the bathing one: 

"Painting under the cliff last 'I'm 
day. I wars disturbed by a showi r of 
pebbles and mud upon my white um- 
brella. Looking up I beheld a crowd 
of young ruffians chucking missiles 
at me with the energy of even sleepy 
Dorset youths. I remonstrated; I 
threatened; I addressed them in vio- 
lent language as vagabonds, rascals, 
brutes, and any other expletives which 
came handy. But it was no use, and 
1 ignomini.i'usly packed up my tools 
and retired, once more defeated by 
the family of Grundy-Hodge. Prob- 
ably the instigator was a son of 
Madam of the bathing machine. . . 
For some reason the white umbrella 
and the worker underneath provokes 
indignation among native populations, 
or it may be 'that we painters are con- 
sidered to be legitimate subjects lor 
sportive mud and stone throwing. In 



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14 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



the Bcguinage at Bruges, and by the 
river, the young Flemings were in- 
tolerable until a detective took me 
under 'his wing and kept off the boys." 

"Race Questions and Other Ameri- 
can Problems", by Josiah Royce 
(Macmillan) has a , number of pages 
devoted to California, and the au- 
thor tries to show what effect the cli- 
mate has had upon the character of 
settlers on the Pacific Coast. In 
speaking of ranch life he says: 

"Especially ill country life the in- 
dividual Californian consequently 
tends toward a certain kind of inde- 
pendence, which I find in a strong and 
subtle contrast to the sort of inde- 
pendence that, for instance, the New 
England farmer cultivates. The New 
England farmer must fortify himself 
in his stronghold against the seasons. 
He must be ready to adapt himself to 
a year that permits him to prosper 
only upon decidedly hard terms. But 
the California country proprietor can 
have, during the drought, more leis- 
ure, unless, indeed, his ambition for 
wealth too much engrosses him. His 
horses are plenty and cheap. His 
fruit crops thrive easily. He is able 
to supply his table with fewer pur- 
chases, with less commercial depend- 
ence. His position, is therefore, less 
that of the knight in his castle and 
more that of the free dweller in the 
summer cottage, who is indeed not at 
leisure, but can easily determine how 
he shall be busy. It is of little im- 
portance to him who his next neigh- 
bor is. At pleasure he can ride or 
drive a good way to find his friends; 
can choose, like the Southern planter 
of former days, his own range of hos- 
pitality; can devote himself, if a man 
of cultivation, to reading during a 
good many hours at his own choice, 
or, if a man of sport, can find during 
a great part of the year easy oppor- 
tunities for hunting or for camping, 
both for himself and for the young 
people of his family. In the dry sea- 
son he knows beforehand what en- 
gagements can be made, without re- 
gard to the state of the weather, since 
the state of the weather is predeter- 
mined." 



The hero of William J. Locke's 
novel "Septimus" is a whimsical and 
childlike person. He meets the 
heroine of the book at Monte Carlo. 
She wins some money for him at tne 
tables and he asks her to keep it in 
her care. Incidentally he asks her if 
she has breakfasted. Thus the narra- 
tive continues: 

Zora was startled. A sane man 
does not talk of breakfasting at 9 
o'clock in the evening. But if he 
were a lunatic perhaps it were wise 
to humor him. 

"Yes," she said. "Have you?" 
"No. I've only just got up." 
"Do you mean to say you've been 
asleep all day?" 

"What's the noisy day made for?" 

"Let us sit down," said Zora. 

They found one of the crimson 

couches by the wall vacant, and sat 

down. Zora regarded him curiously. 

"Why should you be happier if' I 

took care of your money?" 



"Shouldn't spend it. I might meet 
a man who wanted to sell me a gas- 
engine." 

"But you needn't buy it." 

"These fellows are so persuasive, 
you see. At Rotterdam last year a 
man made me buy a second-hand 
dentist's chair." 

"Are you a dentist?" asked Zora. 

"Lord, no! If I were I could have 
used the horrible chair." 

"What did you do with it?" 

"I had it packed up and dispatched, 
carriage paid, to an imaginary person 
at Singapore." 

The- artless sayings of Septimus 
seem at times a trifle too artful. 



A letter from St. Petersburg, pub- 
lished in a Berlin paper, contains the 
information that "Leo Tolstoy, al- 
though still alive, has been consigned 
to eternal punishment by the Russian 
Church." "In the cloister at Glinski," 
the writer says, "there is a large oil 
painting entitled 'The Militant 
Church.' On a stormy sea a great 
ship, representing the Church, is be- 
ing tossed. A group of saints stand 
on its deck, while on the shore may 
be seen the gigantic figure of Tol- 
stoy, in workingman's garb. He is 
surrounded by sinners and dissenters. 
Among these are Herod, Nero, Julian 
and the leading Russian freethinkers. 
Under this group is the legend 'The 
Destroyers of Religion.' At the back 
may he seen the entrance to hell, to- 
ward which the evil spirits are drag- 
ging the sinners in turn. In order 
that there may be no mistake as to 
whom the bearded figure is meant to 
represent, it is marked 'Leo Tol- 
stoy.' " 



Andrew Lang complains in the 
Illustrated London News of the pes- 
tering letters which he receives ask- 
ing his opinion on all sorts of silly 
questions. He says: 

Politico-religious journalism is be- 
coming extremely inquisitive. Dur- 
ing the last ten days even I, who aim 
at strolling, remote from public view, 
on the fallentis semita vitae, have 
been oppressed by curious editors. 

One of them asks me how many 
hours of sleep I think desirable for 
the full perfection of my intellectual 
energies. How can a man answer 
such - a question, and of what inter- 
est would the answer be to any 
mortal? 

Perhaps, if one could sleep as much 
as a dormouse, one's mind would be 
very bright in wakeful intervals; or if 
one slumbered all through the winter, 
as the bear is said to do, one might 
be almost a genius during the cricket 
season. True, the natural historian 
seldom records instances of sagacity 
either in the bear or the dormouse, 
but the dog sleeps qonstantly, when 
he is not out barking all night, and 
the sagacity of the dog is famous. If, 
then, a man could sleep for eighteen 
hours out of the twenty-four, he might 
be a marvel of brilliance .in the other 
six, or, on the other hand, he might 
be treated for the sleeping sickness of 
which we hear so much. In any case, 
every one knows what is the normal 
amount of sleep that adults need, and 



when they do not get it their minds 
and bodies are below their normal 
level of efficiency. To pester people 
with inquiries of this kind would be 
merely babyish, but these Non-con- 
formist editors, of course, want gratui- 
tous signed "copy," and chatter about 
the authors thereof. One of the edi- 
tors coolly demands, "in. a few lines," 
the opinions of total strangers con- 
cerning the Founder of the .Christian 
Religion when stripped of "ecclesias- 
tical setting." This sounds incred- 
ible, but it is a fact. 

One is reminded of the French 
philosopher who asked the German 
philosopher to explain the whole sys- 
tem of Hegel "shortly and in French." 
"These things," replied the other, 
"cannot be explained shortly, espe- 
cially in French." The editor of 
"Mind" is sadly behind. He does not 
send round a circular requesting Tom, 
Dick and Harry to tell him, in a few 
lines, what they think of Aristotle — 
"What is his influence upon you, and 
upon the world?" — and the rest of the 
impertinences. 



Privy Council about usurpers and pre- 
tenders to the Union had been dis- 
regarded, waited at St. James's Palace 
on Aug. 2, 1786, until George 111. ar- 
rived, when she presented him with 
a paper and at the same moment tried 
to stab him with an old ivory-handled 
dessert knife. 

The knife touched the King's waist- 
coat, but, being worn out, bent against 
his person. She was committed to 
the Bedlam Insane Hospital, and re- 
mained there until her death in 1828. 
The publication of this pamphlet and 
of another on "The Necessity of 
Atheism" led to Shelley's expulsion 
from Oxford on March p5, 1811. 

A reprint copy of this earliest of 
Shelley's poetry was put up at auction 
at Anderson's last week. 



One of the rarest of Percy B. Shel- 
ley's works is the "Posthumous Frag- 
ments of Margaret Nicholson, being 
poems found amongst the papers of 
that noted female, who attempted the 
life of the King in 1786. Edited by 
her nephew, John Fitz Victor, Oxford, 
1810." It consists of burlesque poems, 
written by Shelley and Thomas Jef- 
ferson Hogg, then under-graduate at 
Oxford, and which they attributed to 
the mad woman, Margaret Nicholson, 
who, after a petition by her to the 



New Books at the Public Library 

To satisfy patrician tastes we be- 
gin this week in the court circles of 
literature. The Letters of Queen Vic- 
toria, (Longmans, 1907, No. 942-08:18- 
3 vols), are edited by Arthur Christo- 
pher Benson and a K. C. B., Viscount 
Esher. They cover the period from 
1837 to 1861 and in spite of conven- 
tional phraseology they throw light 
on the intimacies of a royal house- 
hold. 

The next volume jumps over the 
Channel and brings us to France. 
The Romance of Royalty, by Fitz- 
gerald Mblloy (Dodd, Mead, 1904— 
No. 923-401:8, 2 vols), deals with the 
mad Ludwig II of Bavaria, Isabel II 
of Spain, the Duchesse d'Alencon, Na- 
poleon III and with the unfortunate 




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IS 



than 

ct that the. 

.is main 

•The Court of Russia in the Nine- 
teenth Century 

ler 1 and shows the difti- 
which the 

end <Ji:rii»K 

with, and 

child's tir>t breath; 

and do not end until the las; pennies 

, may accumtl- 

- Henry II 
called "On Civic Relations", (Hi 
53:42). 
A History of the United States 
Navy from 1775 to 1902, by 

J -No. 
in three volumes. 
The last chapters, dealing with 
Dewey's victory, seem like the his- 
tory of today. 
*The Complete Mountaineer, by 
bleday, 1906 
796:54). tells venturesome 
climbi things 

with a minimum of danger. The book 
will also interest thosi xploits 

do not exceed the perils of climb- 
ing intt ■ bed. 

Flower Decoration in the House, by 
ude Jekyll (■•Country Life". 1907, 
—No. 716-6:2), may be recommended 
to housewives and Others in this part 
i.i where we have Bo many 
flowers and where they are so care- 
lessly displayed. One may put as 
much personality into a "bouquet" as 
hi oil painting) with a little heed. 
Flowers are not necessarily "jack 
straw-", although vases stuffed higgle- 
pigletj wise show thai they may ap- 

to lie SO. 

The remaining books on th'e shelf 
arc: Voice Production in Singing and 
Speaking, by Wesley Mills (Ldppin- 
cott, 1906— Xo. 784-9:41); The Chris- 
tian Family, by G. E. ltiller (Cincin- 
nati, 1907— No. 173:45); and The 
Women of the Middle Kingdom, by 
R. I.. McNabb (N. Y., 1907— No. 
396:60). 

* Books recommended. 

To the Best of Her Knowledge 

It was just as the curtain was be- 
ing rung up that kind-hearted Mrs 
liny suddenlj remembered the in 
quiry that she had intended to make 
about a sick neighbor. She leaned 
hack and accosted Mrs. Bascom, who 
had just moved in next door to the 
sick friend, 

"tan you tell me," she queried, has- 
tily, "how old Mrs. Davis is?" 

A puzzled and reflective look stole 

over the face of Mrs. Bascom as she 

turned for a whispered consultation 

with a third lady directly behind her. 

Presented she bobbed back toward 
Mrs, Grey, her forehead puckered. "I 
really am not quite certain." she re- 
ported, apologetically, "hut 1 believe 
she is at least 75. " — Harper's Week- 
ly. 



Speed and Success 

Ma: 

ly rapid worker, thil 
nothing of dashing "ft three or four 
chapti tting of the story that 

may be in ham] >ion a 

fellow author undertook to remon- 
with him on this point, even to 
the extent of observing that nothing 
could lie well done that is done in a 
hurry. 
"Nothing?" quietly queried Craw 

"Nothing!" was the decisive re- 
9ponsc. 

"How about catching a train?" ask- 
ed Crawford. — Harper's Weekly. 

+ + + 

How Else? 
Medium (after the seance) — Can 

any one tell me how spirits could have 
got into the room and moved the fur- 
niture when all the doors were 
locked? 

Bright Boy (raising Ids hand) — 
With skeleton keys. — Judge. 

Easy to Prevent 

Jones — How can I keep my toes 
from going to sleep? 

Smith — Don't let them turn in. 

* * * 

Domestic Thunder 
Husband — Did you hear the storm 
when it broke this morning? 

Wife — That wasn't the storm. It 
was the new girl washing the break- 
fast dishes. — Baltimore American. 
+ 4» * 

A Sense of Propriety 

"So you stole this man's ax," said 
the Judge. 

"Yessah. I reckons dar ain' no use 
tryin' ter spute de facts." 

"What did you do that for? He said 
he would have been perfectly willing 
to lend you the ax." 

"Yes; but you see, Jedge, dat man's 
on'y jes' moved in de neighborhood. 
I doesn't know him well enough ter 
go 'roun' ter his house borryin'." — 
Washington Star, 

* * * 

He — How did their marriage turn 
out? 

She — As usual. Each one disap- 
pointed the family of the other. — 

Pick-Me-Up. 

+ * + 

"We Have Observed 

That the more a wife keeps her 
husband in hot water, the less tender 
he becomes. 

That the young woman with teeth 
like pearls is rarely as dumb as an 
oyster. 

That no man is really as clever as 
his fiancee thinks he is. 

That while a woman of thirty will 
claim she is not over twenty-six, a 
woman of sixty will say she is seven- 
ty-five. 

* * * 

"A case of love at first sight, eh!" 
"No, second sight. The first time 
he saw her he didn't know she was 
an heiress," — Boston Transcript. 
+ + + 

Mary — How would you like to 
spend eternity with young Rogers? 

Mice— I did. He called last night. 
— I'ick-Mc-Up. 



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Vol. VI. Mo. 5. 



Los JIngeles, California, January 30, 1909- 



lO Cents $2.00 a Year 



Published Every Saturday 

Lissner Building. Los Angeles, California, by the 

PACIFIC OUTLOOK COMPANY 

Subscription price $2.00 a year in advance. 

Single copies 10 cents at all news stands. 

NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERS— The Pacific Out- 
look is mailed to subscribers through the Los 
Angeles Post Office every Friday, and should 
be delivered in every part of the city by Satur- 
day's post. If for any reason it should be de- 
layed, or be delivered in poor condition, sub- 
scribers will confer a favor upon the publishers 
by giving them immediate notice. 

Entered as second-class matter April 5, 1907, at the postofnee at 
Lot Angeles. California, under the act of Congress of March 1,1879. 

The Editor of the Pacific Outlook cannot guarantee to return 
manuscript* .tough he will endeavor to do 10 if stamps for that purpose 
are inclosed with them. If your manuscript is valuable, keep a copy of it. 



THE PACIFIC OUTLOOK'S POLICY 
The Pacific Outlook desires to state unequivo- 
cally that it is not the organ of any creed, sect, 
political party, organization, corporation or per- 
son, but is absolutely free and untrammelled in 
-ociations. 
It stands unqualifiedly, and without fear, for 
that which it believes to be true, clean, honest 
and right in human affairs — political, secular. 
commercial and industrial; and in its columns 
will always maintain an unprejudiced and im- 
partial attitude in its discussion of all subjects 
of universal or local interest. 

GEORGE BAKER ANDERSON, Editor 

COMMENT 



STANTON'S CHANCE 



SPEAKER Stanton of the assembly finds 
himself in a position whence, after a period 
of good behavior and fidelity to the trust 
reposed in him, he may emerge a great big 
man, logically in line for further and higher 
honors. The Pacific Outlook is free to con- 
fess that it has not reposed great trust in 
Stanton in the past by reason of his close 
identification with the railroad organization ; 
but he is making a good record this session, 
and if lie continues to hew to the line, no 
paper in California will be quicker to give 
him credit than the Pacific Outlook. 

( )ne of the highest services Speaker Stan- 
ton could do for the state at this particular 
juncture would be to "take a fall" out of one 
Grove L. Johnson, once the floor boss of the 
majoritv in the Assembly, now a discredited 
leader. While Johnson is growing old, and 
shows his age; while he retains little of the 
nerve and aggressive spirit that he once 
possessed : while the new element in the or- 
ganization — the younger, more independent 
men — simply smile when they hear the 
swish of the whip (we say "swish" because 
Johnson is unable to make it crack any 
morel; he is still a menace to the party 
which elected him to the legislature by rea- 



SOn of his slipperiness and the underhanded 

methods he pursues. So, we say, if Speaker 
Stanton will use the influence of his position 
as head of the party in the assembly (his in- 
dividual, not his official position) t<> put this 
man Johnson where iie belongs, I" relegate 
him to the political junk-heap; if he will 
make Johnson recognize what practical!}' 
everybod3 else in the party recognizes, that 
the "statesman" from Sacramento has lost 
his prestige and his power, that the party 
has outgrown the Johnsonesque style of po- 
litical apparel, that it has abandoned the 
Johnsonian method — if Speaker Stanton 
will do this one thing, and make it perma- 
nent, he will add tremendous strength, in 
'in' judgment, to his popularity. 

Then, after Mr. Stanton has piled Johnson 
up where he belongs, he should take one 
Beardslee, one of his enemies from Stockton, 
an apt pupil of Johnson, and place him snug- 
ly and securely in the niche where he be- 
longs — among the relics of a political regime 
already past and gone forever from Cali- 
fornia. 

Both Johnson and Beardslee, along with 
the aged railroad and racetrack senator from 
San Pedro, are dead, politically, but they 
can't seem to realize it. What Speaker 
Stanton ought to do is to arrange for early 
public obsequies, to be held in the assembly 
chamber during a session at an early date. 
It would be a funeral that would bring- round 
after round of applause from the whole 
state. 

fr T T 

CONVINCING EVIDENCE 



WHEN the California Legislature re- 
elected George C. Perkins to the United 
States Senate it furnished the most con- 
vincing evidence of the need of direct popu- 
lar election of United States Senators. Al- 
though his election by the legislature was 
practically unanimous, no man is so ignor- 
ant as not to know that if Perkins had gone 
before the people directly he would have 
been defeated by an overwhelming vote, so 
well known is his affiliation with the rail- 
road interests. 

On the subject of election of United States 
Senator directly by the people, the Sacra- 
mento Bee says : 

It is the duty of the Legislature to pass a law 
providing for such party nominations for Senator 
by primary elections, and also requiring a popu- 
lar vote on the Senatorship at the ensuing gen- 
eral State election. 

Then, witr the adoption, likewise, of the Ore- 
gon law allowing legislative candidates to file a 
statement to be governed by the popular choice, 



or to disregard it, The People would know whom 
to elect to the Legislature, and a majority of 

that body would he governed hy the popular 
choice for Senator, as expressed at the polls. 

In this way the same result could he had as if 
there wen- an Amendment to the Federal Con- 
stitution taking the election of Senators from the 
Legislature and leaving it in the hands of The 
People, where it should be. Such an Amend- 
ment is highly desirable, but is a very remote 
possibility, owing to the opposition of the United 
States Senate, to begin with, and the control of 
many State Legislatures by the interests opposed 
to the change. 

The next best thing, and a short cut to the 
same end, is the direct primary and a popular 
vote, on the plan adopted in Oregon and numer- 
ous other States in which Senators are nominated 
and practically elected by direct primaries. 

We are getting a little nearer to direct 
legislation and direct nomination and elec- 
tion. The direct primary is a partial solu- 
tion of the problem ; the initiative is the 
basis, and the only sound basis, for a com- 
plete solution. With the initiative in their 
hands, how long would it be before the peo- 
ple of California would put an end forever 
to Herrinism and Perkinism? The answer 

is easy. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

REDUCTIO AD ABSURDUM 



There is no more precious possession of 
a free people than the right of trial by jury, 
yet there is much in the existing methods 
of jury selection and the presentation of 
facts before it that tend to discredit and 
bring into contempt the whole system. 

It is important to know that the founders 
of our jury system intended that juries 
should be composed, so far as possible, of 
men who had been witnesses to the cause 
of action — crime, casualty or whatever it 
might be. But so completely has the sys- 
tem been revolutionized that in these days 
a man suspected of having the slightest 
knowledge of a case on trial has come to be 
regarded, by one side or the other, as an 
undesirable in the jury box. 

( )ur system contemplates — in the code 
hooks — juries of impartial men. 

There should be no difficulty in getting 
such a jury, even in the most difficult case. 
But our jury laws have been so tangled that 
men who read the papers, and have enough 
intelligence to draw conclusions from what 
thev read, are excluded. The ideal juror at 
present is the fool who has never read or 
talked of current affairs, knows nobody, and 
is incapable of forming an opinion on any- 
thing he has heard. The result is that weeks 
and months of time are wasted in finding a 
jury. It took the examination of 3,600 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



talesmen to find a jury in the Durrant case, 
over 1,400 in the Ruef case, and like num- 
bers in other noted cases. 

The Commonwealth Club of San Fran- 
cisco has helped and caused to be introduced 
in the legislature bills intended to restore 
intelligent men to the jury, and protect them 
from the badgering to which they are now 
subjected by the attorneys on both sides. 
One bill changes the law so that newspaper 
readers are eligible for jury service. The 
only opinion that this bill would make a 
ground for challenge is one formed on per- 
sonal knowledge, or the statements of one 
whom the juror believes to have personal 
knowledge of the case. Another bill puts 
the examination of the juror in the hands 
of the court. The grounds of challenge 
would remain as now, but the court and not 
the attorneys would ask the question to find 
out whether the challenge was well 
grounded. 

Some measure is needed to. restore our 
jury system to a sound basis. The techni- 
calities should be cut out. Honest men 
need fear nothing from the sort of jury pro- 
posed by this San Francisco organization. 
If crooks, or crooks' attorneys, are opposing 
it, no better reason for the change sought 
can be advanced. 

♦ ♦ # 

THROUGH OTHER EYES 



IT IS sometimes good that we should see 
ourselves as others see us. This adage or- 
dinarily is applied to individuals. It should 
be equally applicable to municipalities and 
states. Even when adverse criticism is not 
wholly warranted it may have a healthful ef- 
fect, as a sort of warning. 

The San Francisco Call has been paying 
its respects to Los Angeles, taking as a text 
a condition to which the Pacific Outlook be- 
gan to direct public attention something like 
eighteen or twenty months ago.- It was the 
Pacific Outlook, permit us to remark pa- 
renthetically, which first publicly advanced 
the idea that vice was being protected in 
Los Angeles, which first announced Mayor 
Harper's determination to remove James A. 
Anderson from the Board of Public Works, 
which first declared positively that the 
mayor had determined to appoint Edward 
Kern to the Board of Public Works, and it 
was this paper which first, and for a long 
time alone, advocated the invocation of the 
recall in the case of Mayor Harper. But to 
return to the criticism offered by the Call: 

Los and Angeles appears to be in the way of 
a municipal house cleaning. San Francisco ex- 
tends the hand of fellowship and sympathy, wish- 
ing her sister city a good deliverance and a 
plague on all rogues. It is a perilous, turbulent 
process — this house cleaning — as all good wives 
know, but it is wholesome and necessary on oc- 
casion. 

Los Angeles for the present is in the prelim- 
inary stages of the hot fight before the "higher 
ups" have been uncovered, but that will come in 
the due process of political evolution. There is 
no corruption without some wealthy scoundrel 
stands in the background to reap the benefit. 



Like other forms of industry, crime has become 
commercialized and put on a business basis. 

The mayor of Los Angeles is accused of pro- 
tecting vice in that city, even as Mayor Schmitz 
and Ruef made their profit out of sin in San 
Francisco. The Los Angeles Herald and the 
Express have shown how a police commissioner 
was collecting agent for a fashionable house of ill 
fame. Proof is supplied that the police power 
and influence was used to sell stock in corpora- 
tions in which Mayor Harper was heavily inter- 
ested. It is the old familiar story, and San 
Francisco has been through it all. 

Under fire of these exposures, Mayor Harper 
maintains silence. The corrupt practices of his 
appointees have been demonstrated. If he can 
clear himself of responsibility for their acts and 
from the suspicion that he profited by them, he 
should not delay. The citizens propose to remove 
him from office by means of the recall, and if he 
is unable to clear himself he will be dismissed as 
a disgraced man. 

■ We are not aware that any charge has 
been made by responsible parties that May- 
or Harper has profited financially by the 
corrupt practices of his appointees. We have 
always expressed confidence — at least have 
not expressed lack of confidence — in his hon- 
esty in this direction. We do not believe, 
thus far, that Mayor Harper has received 
any pecuniary benefits through the protec- 
tion of vice in Los Angeels ; but we do be- 
lieve that he has exhibited a most profound- 
ly lamentable disregard of the wishes of the 
people, of the sentiment of the great ma- 
jority of public-spirited, progressive and 
loyal citizenship of Los Angeles, and that 
he has demonstrated beyond question his 
unfitness to be trusted with further admin- 
istrative and executive labor for the munici- 
pality. 

What a pity it is — what a great pity, in- 
deed — that Mr. Harper has not been able to 
shake off the horrible incubus of ward poli- 
tics ! What a pity it is that he has not 
profited by the experience of other public 
officials in America who, like him, believed 
themselves to be powerful enough to with- 
stand the onslaught of a righteously en- 
raged populace ! And what a pity it is that 
he has showed himself to be so poor a judge 
of cabinet timber ! What a pity it is that it 
is now too late to save him from his 
"friends" — his false friends! 

* * * 

For "Warblers 

A famous Italian singer declares that sing- 
ers should eat as little meat as possible. His 
luncheon consists of a cheese omelette, as- 
paragus, fruit, and an ice. "Meat kills song," 
he says. "The nightingale, the thrugh and 
the lark are grain eaters, and their song is 
sweet. The carnivorous birds, the crow and 
so forth, only croak. In countries that go 
in for excessive meat eating — England and 
America, for instance — there are few good 
voices. In the more vegetarian countries, 
such as Italy, fine singers abound. AH our 
great singers go in rather for peaches, peas 
and asparagus than for -Steaks and chops. 
Song birds axe vegetarian. Carnivorous 
birds croak." 



CHILE CON CARNE 



By Autogenesis 
After Big Game. — Mr. F. C. Selous is a 
mighty hunter and a good shot. His nerves 
are of the strongest in spite of the fact that 
he is an inveterate tea drinker. He has had 
many hair-breadth escapes from death while 
in pursuit of wild animals. Probably one of 
his most exciting adventures occurred when 
he was going down the Zambesi in a canoe. 
The little craft was sunk in about twelve 
feet of water by a hippopotamus, and Mr. 
Selous, having lost all his belongings, was 
forced to swim for his life. Luckily he 
reached the shore in safety, but it was an 
eerie experience, and one of the hunter's 
narrowest escapes from death. It is not 
generally known, by the way, that Mr. Se- 
lous will be handed down to posterity in the 
person of a popular character in fiction, for 
he is the original of Mr. Rider Haggard's 
ever popular Allan Ouartermain. 



American Methods in China. — Vice Con- 
sul Williams, of Chefoo, says in the last con- 
sular report : "A great weakness in Ameri- 
can trade methods in China is the custom 
cf placing the business of a large number of 
trade agencies in the hands of one firm han- 
dling everything, from seeds to locomotives, 
the business being carried on in one or two 
small rooms. American manufacturers 
should understand that China has passed 
the pioneer stage of doing business in the 
old-time country grocery store." Mr. Wil- 
liams urges the sending of flower and fruit 
seeds to China, as the present supply is not 
up to the best standards. Our seed grow- 
ers in Southern California might easily 
profit by this advice. 



Ecuador's National Exposition. — In 1909 
a national exposition will be held in Quito 
in commemoration of the first efforts made 
for independence. Many new buildings are 
to be constructed for exhibition purposes, 
says the January Consular Report. Some 
of the streets of Quito are to be repaved 
and various other improvements are to be 
made. Although a national exposition, ex- 
hibits are expected from foreign countries 
and especially from neighboring republics. 
The city of Quito lies about 9,500 feet above 
sea level, and fifteen miles south of the 
equator. Heating is not provided for in the 
houses, although the temperature sometimes 
drops to almost freezing point. It would 
seem from this that even at the equator one 
is not always warm. 



A Clever Woman. — There is an old tale 
of a woman who had a banking account. 
The banker sent her a beautiful pink cheque 
book, and whenever she wanted money she 
wrote in it. And one fine morning the 
banker wrote to point out that the lady's 
account was "seriously overdrawn." Where- 
upon she wrote sweetly again in her pretty 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



pink book and 
the amount." 

A Taximeter Inspector? — Fearful that 

cs may be saddled with another 

city official who will draw salary 

for little work I nevertheless reluctantly 

tttention to the fact thai there is no 

ordinance regulating the taxicabs which 

have lately appeared in our midst. London 

si now discussing the question, "Does 

the taximeter lie?" If the tales of the var- 

the drivers are true, it is t. . 

In- feared that the answer must lie in the 

affirmative. It seems possible in a taxicab 

a mile and travel two. 1 should like 

to know if this phenomenon has occurred to 

any riders in taxicabs in this city. In the 

European cities taximeters are subject to 

official inspectii n. 



Disappointment. — I often feel sore when 
a friend fails to keep an oppointment with 

me. I like to pinch him to the minute. 
I want him to obey my expectations as the 
sun obeys the almanac. 1 have suffered a 
longtime from the belief that promises were 
worth keeping. I have had too much faith 
in the minute hand of the clock, hanging 
my hopes on desultory timepieces. Wait- 
ing for a friend who docs not come, or for 
an earthquake which does not tremble, is 
a practice that is' shattering to the nerves 
and quite as gli omy as thrift and economy. 
Disappointment is the reflection of false 
ideals. 



Broken Vows. — Frustrated plans save the 
universe. They have had a prettv bad time 
of it in Messina lately. But it is nothing 
as compared to the misery that would ensue 
if every man kept his word. It is our 
broken promises which save the race from 
destruction. If you and everyone else ware 
to do as I expected you to do I should be shat- 
tered like nougat sweets after the feast. It 
is my disappointment in you which keeps 
me alive. Your broken vows alone save me 
from jail. Were men-of-their-word com- 
mon, society would soon crackle into bits. 
Sanity lies in the unknown and unexpected. 
Natural law is as uncertain as the rain 
in California. There are no beneficent floods 
in kept rules. There is inspiration in a 
cloud burst. 



with it. if Cinderella lik. 

side' M\ father, who has been tilted three 
times at the Richmond police court, sa> s you 
Can't be to,, careful." 

First Chihl: "My dear kid. isn't it some- 
what overdoing it on the safe Bide for Cin- 
derella to >tick nine hundred and nil 

five more lamps on her conveyance than 
Reggie's father >ticks on his? I don't know 
what you may think, but I call it absolutely 
licking the hoots of the police!" 

Anglomania in Spain. — Ever since the 
marriage of King A It', nso the English lan- 
guage and everything English is the most 
correct thing in Madrid, ami the mosl 
fashionable. English fashions in every 
shape and form are all the rage — English 
sports, such as golf, polo, tennis, football, 
horse-racing, etc. There was recently to be 
seen an English musical comedy company 
performing at the Comedia Theatre, and, al- 
though it was of a second-rate order, it met 
with immense success. The newspapers 
have advertisements with such weird expres- 
sions as : "Great, smart straw hats." "High 
life trousers from London — very smart." 
All Spain has gone English mad. and the 
very dogs and horses have English names. 
The following choice specimen of English 
is actually to be seen in one of the shop win- 
dows of a principal establishment of the 
city : "Don't purchase noting until you visit 
this establishment, where the prices are 
most reduced and highly incredibles !" 



The Police and "Cinderella." — At a recent 
performance of "Cinderella" in London the 
following conversation is reported between 
two children who were present at the pan- 
t< iinime : 

First Child (reading): "'A thousand 
crystal lights!' What a frightful lot of 
them I And mustn't it have made someone's 
eyes ache to count them !" 

Second Child: "My father has only cot 
five lamps to his motor-car, and he seldom 
lights up more than three — two in front and 
one behind." 

Third Child: "Well, what's that to do 



A Royal Rebuke. — The sharp reproof to a 
fulsome personal remark which King Vic- 
tor Emanuel so lately gave to the Italian 
member of Parliament who made it to him. 
is not the first time his Majesty has shown 
his marked disapproval of laudatory 
speeches on his behalf. It is related that on 
one occasion at a state ball at the Quirinal, 
his partner — a duchess who wished to curry 
favour with him for her sort; an officer in 
the Italian army — said to him, "Your Majes- 
ty is by far the best dancer I have ever 
waltzed with." The king frowned and an- 
swered: "Then, madam, I can only say 
you place me in an awkward position of 
thinking either you are pitifully ignorant of 
the art of dacing yourself or deliberately 
regardless of the principles of truth, when 
you speak. As your own perfect dancing 
forbids my adopting the first alternative, 
you must see that I am compelled to come 
to the latter conclusion." The duchess's 
reply is not stated, but, despite the compli- 
ment hidden in the king's speech, his exalted 
position alone saved him from a duel with 
the Due di- , the lady's husband. 



Faith in Brawn. — Dr. King, Bishop of 
Lincoln, has just celebrated his eightieth 
birthday. He tells a good story of a trip 
he once took in the Highlands of Scotland 
in company with a big, burly Churchman. 
W'"hile crossing - a loch iti a small boat, a 
heavy storm overtook them. Iirrrrrediately 



l)r. King's companion began to pray. Hut 
this did nol please the matter-of-fact boat- 
man, who expostulated in loud tones, "Xa, 
na." he exclaimed, pointing to Dr. King, 
"this wee mon can pray, but you big 'un 
mun row !" 

+ * * 

Law to Reform the Courts 

The well considered body of legislation 
formulated b) a committee of the i ommon- 
ii Club of this city, says the San Fran- 
cisco Call, is not the work of laymen or 

amateurs. Three justices of the supreme 
COllrt, two trial judges and ten lawyers of 
high standing in their profession, with the 
assistance of some enlightened laymen, co- 
operated in the work. The purpose is to 
make justice in criminal cases speedy and 
certain. . 

A beginning is made with legislation to 
make it possible to put the grand jury on 
trial. The waste of time from this practice 
has become a public scandal. Probably 
there is law enough now on the books to 
stop it, but the process has assumed the 
legal importance of precedent and a specific 
prohibition appears to be required. In the 
same general line is a bill to cure the vicious 
sophistication of law relative to the dis- 
qualification of jurors because the}' happen 
to have read reports of evidence in the case 
on trial. The meticulous refinements in- 
sisted on by the supreme court in this re- 
gard have reduced trial by jury in California 
to absurdity. They should be wiped out by 
a statute defining a sane basis of qualifica- 
tion. 

Another abuse attacked by the club is the 
waste of time in preparing appeals. The 
bill of exceptions, which sometimes takes a 
year to settle, is abolished altogether, and 
its place' is taken by a transcript of testi- 
mony to be filed within thirty days of tak- 
ing the appeal. The process is automatic 
and precludes any wrangling as to what 
shall be included. 

Finally the club proposes to make one 
more attempt to persuade appeal courts that 
judgments should not be reversed except for 
errors affecting substantial merits. To be 
sure, that is law already, but it does not 
appear to have much influence with the 
higher courts. When a solemn judgment 
of a trial court is reversed on a trifling point 
of special pleading it might seem difficult to 
formulate a law that would induce a better 
frame of mind on the appellate bench. Con- 
fronted by this grave condition we must put 
our trust in the persuasive ingenuity of the 
Commonwealth Club and never despair. 
* * * 
She Cleveland Experiment 

For two weeks the city of Cleveland has 
been in the throes of a sociological experi- 
ment. The first phase of this has just ended. 
It began with 1800 young people banding 
themselves together to live, during the time 
allotted, as they presume Jesus would live 
under the same condition. As soon as this 
remarkable movement started, 10.000 volun- 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



teers joined it. Now nothing else is talked 
about in Mr. Rockefeller's stronghold. 

It did not take long for quite a number 
of the wage earners to drop out of the run- 
ning. Stenographers complained that they 
were compelled to write what they knew 
were lies. Nurses had to assent to marriage 
proposals or lose their patients. Clerks 
found they were expected to do business 
on false pretenses. Factories were unjustly 
blamed for the non-delivery of goods. In- 
deed, the mesh of deceit that surrounds 
much of the business of Cleveland seems to 
have been pretty well torn. To everybody's 
surprise the customs of this city and the 
teachings of Jesus are at dagger's point. 
The Sermon on the Mount and the modern 
methods of conducting business do not 
agree. This the experiment has illustrated 
We do not like to face the facts of this 
damning kind. They must be squarely met 
now, says the Boston Post. 

The conditions in Cleveland and those in 
every other large city in the country are 
alike. If a person cannot live there accord- 
ing to tile teachings of Jesus, and hold his 
job, he can't do so in Boston. We are prob- 
ably not much better, and possibly not much 
worse. 

Two questions are forced by this experi- 
ment. First : Would Jesus have modified his 
views to suit the twentieth century condi- 
tions? Second: Is it absolutely necessary 
that a successful business be conducted on a 
basis of insincerity? In otfier words, must 
there be two standards, one for business and 
one for private life ? Is a gentleman con- 
doned for lying- in the counting-room and 
condemned for doing so in the drawing- 
room? Must a clerk be a Dr. Jeky^and a 
Mr. Hyde? 

Plain questions aften answer themselves. 
Conditions are ephemeral. Truth is eternal. 
But methods of conducting business are sub- 
ject to earthquakes according as the people 
are ethically supine or alert. No one can 
modify truth ; but you can modify life. It 
is very probable that Christ would apply the 
thong more vigorously than he did 2000 
years ago. 

The second question also answers itself. 
T. A. Stewart founded his fortune on abso- 
lute truth. He never permitted an employe 
to lie about his business. The fact of it is, 
there has never been a time when the de- 
mand for business probity was greater than 
it is today. We are a nation of imitators. 
Successful rebates — enormous graft — the co- 
pious watering of securities — the gullibility 
of the common people — the ease of getting 
■ something for nothing — all this and much 
more is partially the reason why houses 
have been built on a foundation of sand. 
"Easy money" and easy conscience go hand 
in hand. Those who look for the one possess 
the other. . . 

It is said that in a few weeks over 5,00,000 
young people in this country will make the 
Cleveland experiment a basis for a perma- 



nent life. If that is done the business as 
well as the habits of our people will have 
to be remodelled from the foundation. Leav- 
ing the spiritual standpoint, for the sake of 
the welfare of our country, it is the best 
thing that could happen. 
t * * 
Purifying Municipal Government 

A recent issue of the Bulletin of the Na- 
tional Municipal League says : 

One of the subjects in political advance- 
ment which is attracting particular attention 
is that of the initiative, referendum and re- 
call. In a paper read before the National 
Municipal League, Robert Treat Paine, Jr., 
of Boston, told what had been accomplished. 
As chairman of the executive committee of 
the Massachussets Public Opinion League, 
Mr. Paine has been seeking to obtain effec- 
tive legislation in that state on the subject. 

Some of the results cited by Mr. Paine 
were : 

"Los Angeles has adopted provisions for 
the initiative, the referendum and the recall 
in a new charter, 1903. San Diego, San Ber- 
nardino, Pasadena, Sacramento, Santa Mon- 
ica, Alameda, Eureka, Santa Cruz, Long 
Beach and Riverside did likewise in their 
charters. San Francisco, Vallejo and Fres- 
no had adopted the initiative previously and 
the system was enlarged later. 

"Portland, Oregon, adopted the initiative 
and the referendum in its municipal charter. 
In 1906, Oregon, by a popular initiative, 
voted 47,678 to 16,735 to authorize any city 
or town to establish its direct legislation. 

"Seattle, Spokane and Everett, in Wash- 
ington, adopted direct legislation. More or 
less complete provisions for direct legisla- 
tion have been added to the Galveston plan 
as applied in San Antonio, Houston, El 
Paso, Fort Worth, Dallas and Waco. Des 
Moines, Iowa, combines direct legislation 
provisions with the Galveston commission 
system. Cedar Rapids adopted direct legis- 
lation. Lewiston, Idaho, obtained a com- 
mission charter with direct legislation in 
1907. 

"Leavensworth, Kans., has a commission 
government with a referendum on all fran- 
chises. Haverhill and Gloucester, among 
Massachusetts towns, have followed the Des ■ 
Moines model. South Dakota, in 1907, au- 
thorized a commission form of government 
in all cities, with a five per cent initiative 
and referendum. 

"Kansas City, taking advantage of the 
home rule provision of the Missouri consti- 
tution adopted in August, has a commission 
charter with direct legislation. Omaha, Lin- 
coln and other Nebraska cities have adopted 
the provisions authorizing the initiative and 
referendum. Denver adopted direct legis- 
lation in 1904. Memphis, Tennessee, has a 
referendum on franchises. Montana granted 
direct legislation to cities and Maine per- 
mits voters in any municipality to establish 
it." 

Mr. Paine cited examples of other cities 



in which the tendency is toward a more 
popular form of government and, speaking 
of the approval given in cases where such 
legislation was suggested, he said : 

"The popular votes accepting direct legis- 
lation generally have been overwhelming. 
No instance is known where the system 
once established and tried has be«n repealed. 
Many other cities are actively considerinp 
its adoption." 

♦ * ♦ 
Curious Cult 

A new cult known as the "Abirewa" (Old 
Woman) Fetich", made its appearance in 
Ashantee in the year 1907. The "Abirewa" 
was supposed to be accompanied by a male 
companion called "Manggura," who acted as 
her executioner. Those who drank the potion 
"Abirewa" believed themselves to be pro- 
. tected against evil influences. They had 
faith that it brought good health and pros- 
perity, so long as its rules were not trans- 
gressed, and that it killed witches and per- 
sons who dealt in black magic. Dances took 
place at all villages which had accepted 
"Abirewa", and its devotees were distin- 
guished by an oblong in white clay painted 
on the forehead and on either temple. It 
was reported that the corpses of those who 
were said to have been killed by "Abirewa" 
were mutilated and otherwise maltreated, 
and buried in shallow graves strewn with 
broken bottles with most degrading formali- 
ties. "Abirewa", in its most harmless form, 
is now practived throughout Ashantee. 



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PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



Ho Might Have Been Somebody 



&/>0 Cos^iper 



11V I.I. Ml M. \ > 

Mi- might h an author and have written 

mar 

little hour a ii < I molder down the 

s cultured, he was traveled, 

villi write: 
But the product nius never seemed to 

the light. 

his name attached to "Letters to 
the Pr< - 
But he always wr..t, a gentle word to soothe a 

friend's ili-tr. 
And when he was in Petersburg, and Peking and 
in Rome, 

! of writing "travels," he was writing letters 
home. 

IK- might have been an orator and wielded words 

of Same 

iminate the nation and to glorify his name 
IK- was able, he was tactful, he was eloquent of 

speech; 
But he did not spread the eagle and rejoice t.> 

bear it screech. 
Seldom on the public platform did he ever play 

part; 
But be always bad a happy word to help a heavy 

heart 
And perhaps bis cheerful speeches were too 

simple for the stump: 
But they made a fallen friend forget he'd ever 

bad a bump. 

He might have been a scholar with a string of 

high degri 
And have found some hidden meaning in the 

plays of Sophocles; 
But. instead of ever studying the dim and ancient 

letter, 
lie was studying his little world and how to make 

it better: 
How to do some little kindness, common to the 

passing eye, 
But which tlu- hurried rest of us had noted — and 

passed by. 
He might have been somebody on some self 

encircled plan, 
If he hadn't been so busy being something of a 

man. 



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KllOX The Hatter 



; McAktiii k in Nkw York Si \ 
In his hour of pain an. I shame, 
In bis prison house of flame, 
When revenge the devil sought 
Little tongues of lire he wrought; 
Tongues to lie ami twisl .nid turn. 
Tongues t,, scorch and sear and burn. 
Tongues to slay the high and holy. 
Tongues p. si.-iy the poor .mil lowly; 
Then to earth the ti n senl 

There to work bis fell intent; 
To whisper, hint and smirch and sneer, 
And to nil the world with Fear; 
l-'oul with gossip thai can kill 
Evermore to work bis will. 
» * * * * 

The little tongues of hell 

Still sen e the devil well 

* * * 
Born of Idleness 

Governor Harris of Ohio believes that 
criminals can be employed on a farm with 
advantage to themselves and the state. He 
propose that prisoners in the penitentiary 
who are not confirmed criminals be trans- 
ferred to the reformatory and put to work 
on the state farm. "It is the conditions of 



OUT cities that breed crime," says tlu 
ernor. "Most ,,f it can be traced . 
and drink, and indleness is frequently 

cause of drink. There is little drink in the 

country and practically no idleness. If the 
young man who had slipped over the 1" ■ 
of a law were taught scientific farming he 
would come to like it and escape the associ- 
ates win. carry him down when be returns 
i"i lu- city." 

"1 am so happy," -In said "Ever since my en- 
gagement to Charlie the whole world seems dif- 
ferent. I do not seem to be in dull, pro aii I rig 
land, but" 

"Lapland," suggested her little brother, who 
was doing ]ns geography lesson. — Illustrated 

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PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



HIT OR MISS 

.Mr and Mrs. Thilo Becker gave a 
reception to Mr. and Mrs. William 
Shakespeare last evening. 



Angeles, is in Paris and is stopping 
with Miss Fannie Duval in her charm- 
ing quarters in the rue Vavin. 



Mr. G. M. Falconer of Mexico City- 
has been in Los Angeles since Christ- 
mas. -He was on the staff of the 
Mexican Herald and was also the 
editor and owner of the International 
Magazine of the southern capital. He 
is so much pleased with the prospects 
in Southern California that he he pes 
to establish himself here in. connec- 
tion with some literary work. 



Miss Mary Buehrmann is a recent 
recruit to the professional platform 
who has recently come to Los An- 
geles for a visit. She studied at the 
Anna -Morgan studios in Chicago. 
Miss Buehrmann's chief success- has 
been in impersonations of Japanese 
characters. "A Pot of Paint" written 
by Onoto Watanna, is a charming- 
sketch rendered in a dainty and fanci- 
ful fashion by this promising young 
artist. " 



Mr. Frank -Baum, the author of the 
Father Goose stories, was in, Los An- 
geles recently and has gone to Coro- 
nado for a visit. He is greatly inter- 
ested in the movement in New York 
which is trying to establish a dis- 
tinctly children's theatre. 



Mrs. G F. Nixon, wife of Senator 
Nixon of Nevada is stopping at the 
Alexandria Hotel and is at home on 
Sunday evenings to receive her 
friends. She is interested in the lo- 
cal writers of Southern California and 
is making a collection of their works 
which is to be bound by Mrs. I. M. 
Strobridge. 



At the next meeting of the Parent 
Teachers Association of Hollywood, 
to be held February 5, Hector Ai- 
liot of this city will by special invita- 
tion present the claims of the League 
of the School Beautiful. 

This is a society recently formed 
by Mr. Alliot and various representa- 
tive women of Los Angeles, the ob- 
ject of which is the beautifying of 
the interiors of our public schools. 
It is proposed to unify and systema- 
tize all efforts in that direction, so 
as to avoid needless expense and fre- 
quent duplication. A part of the pro- 
ject is the founding of an interchange- 
able art collection of reproductions 
of famous masterpieces for special ex- 
hibition and adornment in' those 
schools which are unable to enjoy the 
benefits of those more favorably lo- 
cated. iSince the service is a purely 
voluntary one, and the movement will 
be. sustained by the members of the 
League, it is desired that all persons 
interested in the welfare of our pub- 
lic schools shall lend their hearty 
support and co-operation to the work. 

Branches are already forming in 
a number of the suburban and country 
towns and the movement bids fair to 
become a general one throughout the 
southern portion of the State. 



Mr. Sidney Armer of Berkeley has 
been in the South sketching for the 
last month. He will be joined soon 
by his wife, Mrs. Laura Adams Ar- 
mer, who has long been known as 
a capable and artistic photographer 
in San Francisco. She will also do 
some sketching while in our neigh- 
borhood. 

Miss Alice Coleman of San Fran- 
cisco, will give an evening of music 
and Greek dances at the Gamut Club 
February 4. 



Miss Bessie Bartlett and Mrs. Philip 
Zobelein will unite on February fourth 
in giving a musical at the Hollywood 
mansion of Mr. Bartlett. Miss Lil- 
lian Smith and Mr. Edwin House will 
assist and Miss Bartlett will read 
Enoch Arden, accompanied on the 
piano by Mr. Archibald Sessions. 



Another interesting musical will 
take place February 10 at the home 
of Mrs. Van Nuys when Mr. and 
Mrs. H. C. Lott, Mrs. Bertha Vaughn 
and Mr. F. Gutterson will be heard. 



The Southern California Academy 
of Sciences has just issued its semi- 
annual bulletin recording the trans- 
actions of the society for the last 
year. It is full of valuable notes 
touching on various topics of scientific 
import and local interest. The edi- 
tor, Mr. Collins, says: "Our climate 
affords exceptional advantages for as- 
tronomical observations, and a study 
of our flora has revealed curious, rare 
and valuable plants found in no other 
land, while the excavations- on the 
Channel Islands and in the localities 
which were the habitat of the extinct 
tribes of this Coast, . have revealed 
new and curious matter for study by 
the ethnologist. The work of the 
Academy deserves the highest com- 
mendation and all the encouragement 
that may be .given it." 



Prof. George E. Hale will lecture 
before the Academy of Sciences on 
Monday next on "The Work of the 
Mt. Wilson Solar Observatory." 



Miss Jessie Washburn, a well 
known flower and fruit painter of Los 



Apropos of the water color draw- 
ings shown last week in Kanst's gal- 
lery it may be interesting to note 
that the psychologists, doctors and 
scientists of Berlin are much exer- 
cised over the weird pictures of a poor 
Saxon washerwoman, Frau Wilhelmi- 
na Assman. While in a condition of 
trance she produces flower designs 
of an astonishing fineness of touch 
and delicacy of color. The pictures 
shown here were not, I believe, don? 
under the trance conditions, how- 
ever. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. K. Foster and their 
son are preparing to sail for Liver- 
pool about the twenty-ninth of April. 
They go from Montreal and will pass 
some time in New York before set- 
ting out for the Canadian metropolis. 
This will necessitate their leaving Los 
Angeles in about six weeks. 



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LITTLE QUEEN BAB 

By 

DOROTHY RUSSELL LEWIS 

"Little Queen Bab is a sweet-tempered, unselfish wholesome little 
country girl who goes into the big city to visit her aunt and uncle, 
the latter a successful author, estranged from his farmer brother, 
father of Bab. How she brings the two together and spreads sun- 
shine all about her is the pretty iittle story." — The Graphic. 

"Young readers are sure to be delighted with the beautiful disposition 
of Bab, the little heroine." — Los Angeles Herald. 

"Little Queen Bab is only a snub-nosed, 12-year-old girl, but she is 
such a lovable little mite that she marches right into your heart at 
once, and stays there." — Los Angeles Express. 

"A story that ought to be in the h-nds of all children, cr in the hands 
of all parents, that they may read it to their children." — Pacific Out- 
look. 

"The story is a true inspiration f :r any child." — Los Angeles Times. 

Daintily bound in white leatherette, 35 cents. 

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PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



Things From Various Quarters Worth Knowing 



and their 

ti-r at an early 

class 

itor 

In order thai their children should 

atone in learnit irents 

;ami- 

ffer them the same advan- 

they 
arc mure ambitious, and some of the 

have 

from the poorer class, There 

in every street where the 

id where the ch 

are a mere pittance— nts a 

Ami vealthy families 

as what is termed a 
lie is a man of education, and it is 
irain the youni3 man with 
to his manners, the care of his 
clothes and see that he i- kept clean. 
It" he goes out for a call tins person 
accompanies him. stands by him and 
instructs him what t" do, -its by 
him at table, and is his constant com- 
panion. I,., .king not 01 ly after his ma- 
il welfare but spiritual as well. 
"While in Persia," -ays a writer in 
the Natioi ess of Mothers 

Magazine. "I wa- entertained at a 
tea where sixtei these young 

men were invited. Their ages 
n II) to IS years, I have 
never witnessed more beautiful or re- 
fined manners. Two of them were 
princes, sons 'if the Shah, who were 
ding ilii- -ill"" 
"The mosques are rot only places 
aver but for instruction as well. 
There are schools of all nationalities. 
French, German, Russian English and 
many others. French is taught in all 
of them and i- a second language, 
in the villages the priest is also a 
teacher, and the hoys and girls at 
tend the same school until 9 or 10 
years of age. 

"In the wealthy families the girls 



erne--, hut they are noi 
: the higher hrar l tile, 

Inn some are taught music and paint 
ing. Theii j lucation consists 

of being aide to read the Koran and 

in domestic duties. 

\ girl'- highest ambition is to he a 
wife and mother. The harem 
i- not what I used to think — tin ex 
elusive place for wives. It is -im- 
ply tlie inner court or apartments 
where all tile women of the household 
There are bald mies and gardens 
the children play, The 
dens are always full of rare and beau- 
tiful flower- and fountains and -"in 
of them are' very beautiful. 

"The fathers, brothers and relative- 
can visit them, hut stranger- are ex- 
cluded. In the large cities the women 
cover their faces when on the street 
with a black veil, 'but in the country 
and villages they do not. 

"The Persians as a race develop both 
mentally and physically very young, 
and when I asketl .about the early 
marriages this was given as an il- 
lustration: 

"When you have many flowers in a 
garden you become accustomed to 
them and do not appreciate their fra- 
grance, but when, you are kept out of 
the garden and have only a single 
rose brought to you you will inhale 
its perfume and appreciate its beauty. 

"So it is with the young, when they 
seldom see one of the opposite sex 
they value them more and make bet- 
ter wives and husbands. From 12 to 
16 is the marriageable age for boys 
and girls even younger. 

The children are so precocious that 
they will learn in two hours what 
will require an American boy two 
days. As an instance, I have per- 
sonally studied many young children 
of 5 or 6 who were high up in classes 
of the public schools. To see a child 
of 7 recite secenes from ancient his- 
tory and solve arithmetical problems 
is more than astonishing, especially 



when mbers that the 

child, being one of many children of 
the same family, ha- had hardly any 

but nature and the element- I,, mature 
him. 

" I 'hi i i iursc many i xceptions 

and the rich and well-to-do families 

unusual numbers ,,f servants and 

- in bring up their children, but 

as i w hide i in account of i he very 

families the parent cannot but 

leave the children largely to. nature, 

and that i- why they are SO strong 

and hardy. 

"The country tribes are very similar 
to our American Indian- Persia is 
very democratic. The child of very 

i r parents may become prominent 

if he is ambitious. 

"It is a wonderful land and people, 
They are waking up in a most surpris- 
ing way. Where two years ago there 
were only six newspapers in all Per- 
sia there are now 150 and they arc 
read by all classes." 

Chinese Press Censorship 

Not long ago some Chinese gentle- 
men with horse tails depending from 
their official bonnets saw to it that an 
offending editor was right properly 
flogigied with bamboo rods — 100 lashes 
were the editor's portion. These 
gentlemen had no private grievance; 
they were simply putting the new 
press laws of China into operation. 

Last year, when everything in China 
hummed with the news of a changing 
order, when the old Empress Dowager 
announced from her dragon throne 
that she would have a constitution in 
China within ten years or know the 
reason .why, and when the boycott 
against the Japanese manufacturers 
was assuming the features of a nation- 
al movement, some of the native 
papers played fast and loose with an- 
cient decorum. They even criticised 
the government. That called for ac- 
tion from high sources. 

Some yamen in Peking, whose prov- 
ince is to look after things as they 



ought to he in the internal n 
the empire, -cut a taotai till the waj 
ti ' England and I li i man] to si udj 
how the governi ndlcd 

obstrepi roil new papei rid called in 
for advice a former Minister to Bet 
lin. When all the data were at hand 
thi- yamen formulated something uni- 
que in the way of pre-- laws. It 
was put in operation last May, and the 
tone of a great many native papers 
has dropped about two octaves as a 
result. The publishers, printers and 
editors of newspapers fur general cir- 
culation must he over 20 year- of 
age according to the existing press 
laws; they must be generally accepted 
as of sound mind and none of them 
may continue his calling if he has ever 
served a prison- sentence for any 
crime. 

Each proprietor must deposit securi- 
ty of his rectitude to the amount ot 
$75 before issuing the first sheet un- 
less he can prove that his publication 
is purely artistic, educational or sta- 
tistical. A copy of each issue must be 
scut to the yamen that formulated 
these laws. 

"Corrections or protests against 
misstatements must be published in 
the next issue," says the mandate. 
"In casie the number of words in the 
letter of correction forwarded to the 
editor is more than twice the number 
of words used in the original state- 
ment a fee of half the ordinary ad- 
vertisement rates may be charged." 

Secret intelligence of state, criticism 
of the throne or matter tending to in- 
flame the public peace of mind or cast 
odium upon long accepted popular 
custom if printed will render the edi- 
tors, publishers and printers of the 
papier containing such inhibited mat- 
ter all subject to fine or imprisonment 
for not less than six months, nor more 
than two years. Papers may be sus- 
pended upon a repetition of any of the 
offenses stipulated or confiscated al- 
together. 



•? 



1? 



1? 



•P 



■? 



■f 



•? 



1? 



i? 



i? 



V>he SleuiH Reporter 

Young Egbert and his mother sat 
mysteriously at the head of the stairs 
in the dim light of early evening. 

A few moments before Egbert's 
sister had received a young man 
caller and had promptly disappeared 
with him into the gloomy recesses of 
the front parlor. 

Young Egbert's one ambition was 
to lie a reporter. He had read all the 
literature on the subject, his mind was 
filled vith "scoops" ami "beats" and 
he had determined, with proper jour- 
nali-tic instinct, to do justice in this 

OeCasii ill 

I lis mother, excusing herself on the 

ground that she had a duty to per- 



form in watching her daughter, was 
equally ready to listen. Egbert slid 
down stairs, but in a few moments 
silently returned. Breathlessly he 
whispered: 

"Present indications are that there 
will be a good story, all right. Here 
is a diagram of room. iChairs arc ar- 
ranged: with sofa in extreme corner. 
Gas shedding faint glimmer. Con- 
versation as follows: 

" - ii. George! How could you?' 
lull particulars later." 

i Ince more lie sped away, and again 
returned 

"Situation practically unchanged. 
Lovers apparently have no realization 
of their danger. Progress to sofa 
marked by demonstrations all along 
the line of march. At last report- 



holding hands. Sofa creaking slight- 
ly," 

In a few moments more he was 
back again: 

"Sh. At 7:47 Eastern time, there 
was a faint smacking sound quickly 
followed by another. Silences be- 
tween. These continued at intervals 
of about five seconds, with scarcely 
any interruption, until a blind on win- 
dow blew back. Following conversa- 
tion was taken down 

" 'Oh, George!' 

" 'You mustn't!' 

" 'My hair is coming down !' 

"George refused to be interviewed 
Hair fell at 7:52. Full particulars 
later." 

Egbert sped away once more. But 
at this instant the boy reporter's 



father came in through the front d , 

opening it with a latch-key, having 
first become aware of the buggy in 
front. 

The boy's next report was as fol- 
low-: 

"It was indeed a thrilling moment. 
The light from overhead, now sud- 
denly -become like a noonday sun, 
shone down on a scene that baffles 
description. Devastation reigned su- 
preme. The young and beautiful girl 
reached in vain for the imported puffs 
that strewed the floor. Her confes- 
sion in full, with description of her 
clothes, »i!l appear in a later edition." 
—Life. 

* * * 

Every snail knows the hollowness 
of its own shell. 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



By Chari,es 

THE current exhibition at 
Blanchard Gallery introduces 
to the Los Angeles picture- 
viewing public an artist of some cele- 
brity, both in Europe and America. 
Jean Mannheim is a painter of great 
versatility. His cosmopolitanism, too, 
insures a sufficient variety of sulject 
in the many branches of pictorial art 
that he feels moved to essay from 
time to time. If this same wide range 
of choice has .precluded his acquiring 
any fixed style in his work, the assur- 
ance that he is settled among us 
makes us look forward to his inter- 
pretation of the outdoor aspect of 
Southern California, for we may be 
sure that it will be as untrammeled 
by previous pictorial experience as is 
the work of our own resident painters. 

One says the "picture-viewing pub- 
lic" not too advisedly. Perhaps the 
picture-buying public is all that is 
sought as visitors to a show r that can 
claim "'Salons", "old master copies", 
as its hall-marks. For, be it noted, 
the admittance is not general, but by 
card only, a rather new departure for 
a gallery that has heretofore been 
quite democratic in its policy. 

Mr. Mannheim is well-known in » 
sister city as a painter of portraits. 
While not pretending to a Whistlerian 
carefulness in arrangement or facture, 
his translations of his subject are so 
very competent in their realistic 
modeling of planes as to be always 
convincing. 

The best of these, in dignity and 
simplicity, is the portrait of the art- 
ist's mother. An influence, nay, a 
careful study of Rembrandt, is there 
evident. The painter has triumphed 
just in the degree that he has humbly 
put himself in the mood of the great 
master's methods and a strong, fine 
thing is the result. 

The artist's later and more pre- 
tentious work, the piece that takes 
the place of honor on the north wall 
of the gallery, is called "The Chil- 
dren's Hour". The young children or 
a happy and busy family are grouped 
around a mother's knee in the fine 
divided light of the time of day when 
it is not yet dark outside, and yet too 
obscure to see without a lamp in the 
nursery. This problem of illumina- 
tion, with the bended head of the 
mother silhouetted against the rosy 
lamp-shade, is a task that would try 
a daring and resourceful palette. The 
artist has accomplished the feat he 
set himself, with great eclat. And if 
this same striking effect seems too 
easily brought about — if, in a word, 
art does not quite conceal art, — that 
were the only fault that could be 
urged against a canvas vibrant with 
clear color and frank tone. 

Opposite this last hangs a study of 
the artist's wife and child, with the 
title "Whispering Love". Here the 
scale of color is a closer one. A tang 
of none too interesting gray makes 
itself felt under the local color-scheme 
of the .green dress of the adult figure 



Percy Austin 

against the little girl's clear flesh. 
This silvery "envelope" is present in 
all the other indoor and genre sub- 
jects shown, among them Mr. Mann- 
heim's salon success, "In the Laun- 
dry". The sentiment or incidental 
element in these things is so sum- 
mary, as one might say, so apart from 
that which interested the artist, that 
it is quite fair to consider the tonal or 
artistic side away from the literary 
interest of mere title. 

So it is, one feels, that, in his out- 
door studies, .Mr. Mannheim's thor- 
oughly workmanlike ability finds 
greater scope. . He has traveled 
abroad in the two years just passed, 
and painted much in Italy, Switzer- 
land, Belgium, France and England. 
Latterly he had been assisting Frank 
Brangwyn in his London school and 
whether or not that painter's meaty 
and colorful manner influenced him, 
certain it is that his outdoor travel 
subjects show a spontaneity and fresh- 
ness that greatly charm. He pro- 
fesses himself out of sympathy with 
the clear flat atmosphere effects of 
high altitudes, such as Switzerland 
and Colorado, yet he has brought a 
number of fine things in mountain 
landscape from these countries, too. 

But the most pleasing canvases in 
the exhibition are those views of canal 
life and Flemish town life that he has 
found near Furnes, Belgium. A load 
of hay in a lumbering old-country 
wagon, at halt in the shade of chest- 
nut trees in a market place, with mar- 
ket-people bargaining over a pile cf 
pottery in the foreground, makes the 
composition of one of them. Again 
there is a picturesque street scene in 
Furnes with the old Spanish tower in 
the distance. Ponderous barges re- 
flected in the still waters of a green- 
banked canal, or a stormy day in a 
coast town in the Lowlands — all these 
give those atmospheric motives of 
sunshine and shadow, near and afar 
off, that the painter seems most to 
delight in. 

His unctuous brush work seizes 
easily and firmly the aspects of 
things, already picturesque, and made 
more striking by the soft light of the 
golden sun or the scudding shadows 
of great cumulus clouds. None but a 
sure and rapid painter can put these 
things on canvas in modern fashion. 
To catch the transitory quality in 
lighting and the exact time of 
day are no problem to this artist's 
sure vision with its backing of long 
experience. 

If the rest of these numerous can- 
vases give some hint as to how that 
experience was gained they can not 
be less interesting, making allowances 
for the time probably spent on them, 
than the more finished work. It is 
hinted that Mr. Mannheim will de- 
vote himself principally to portraits 
for sometime to come, in which case 
we shall see revealed some qualities 
of which the present exhibition gives 
only a faint idea. For 'with the pleas- 



ingly varied scales of color in the 
later out-door work and his .great 
power of modeling, the painter can 
build up a counterfeit of nature at 
once vivid and highly artistic in 
tonality, with none of the crudeness 
or forcing of effect that is the resort 



of many popular brushers of like- 
nesses. 

Mr. Mannheim also shows two 
splendid copies of Old Mlasters. These 
are transcriptions of Raphael's 
"Jeanne d'Aragon" and an Andrea 
Del Sarto, "The Holy Family". 




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At our prices and terms no home 
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low prices but the instrument of ele- 
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value. 

DO YOU REALIZE THAT WE PLACE IN YOUR HOME ON 
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PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



•i for 

would 

■i- with ii 

here fit 

and 
mi. by thi 

culture, would 
instructive 
- much efl 

ir«l a tun •■: 
natnr - in the directii 

up the "kultur- 

wil! continue until 
From January 2? and will 
if the work 
les's women paii 
+ + * 

Some Freahs of Earthquahes 
rthquake in 
rn Italy and Sicily brings to 
n of the student of seismic 
disturbances some of of the 

hquakes of the past. In the 
great earthquakes that visited Chili in 
1822 '.lure was produced a perma- 
nent elevation "i from two to seven 
in area covering nearly 
i| thousand square miles 
Vndes and the coast, 
and geologists making investigations 
after the shock claim to have discov- 
ered trace- nf the seat at a long dis 
tance inland, indicating that there 
must have been prei ious earthquakes 
in Chili of which history lias no rec- 

ln the Lisbon disaster of 1775. 
when the win de city was wrecked in 
six minute- and fifty thousand people 
Lost their lives, the biggest mountains 
in Portugal were shaken to the very 
foundations and large masses hurled 
into the valleys, buryinlg many of the 
residences and killing hundreds of 
people. It i> reported that in the same 
earthquake a massive marble quay 
newly built sank into the sea with 
thousands oi people who had gathered 
on it for protection, and that not one 
Of the bodies ever came to the surface 
afterward. Nothing has since been 
seen nf the structure, the presumption 
. thai ;' fissure opened up beneath 
the water permitting the quay and its 
load nf human freight to fall out ot 
sight. In addition in the above it is 
recorded that of all the ships in the 
harbor at Lisbon that sank with the 
shock not a vestige nf one was after- 
ward seen floating on the water. 

In 1S11 and 1812 the Mississippi 
valley was visited by -nine disastrous 
seismic disturbances, The valley was 
SO convulsed and shaken by the shocks 
thai new islands ami lakes twenty 
miles in length were formed in the 
incredible space i an hour, while the 
existing lake- were drained dry. The 
cemetery at New Madrid was precipi- 
tated " lie river, am! the ground 

nn which the town i- built sank eight 

feet. 

In the same year as the Mississippi 



The 

t) un- 
dulated like a boiling liquid, and tcr- 
ere heard. 
The wlele city with its magnificent 
churches ami public building 

1 in a minute, and twelve thou- 
sand people killed. In an earlier earth- 
quake in Vcnczm part nf the 

i sank out "t 
forming a lake eight hundred yari 
diameter and eighty feet . 

Probably the best instance of the 
opening and closing of fissures thn 
seismic disturbances is afforded in the 
irian earthquake in 1783. This 
disturbance. nf disturbai 

I nearly four years, anil ii is 
-aid that men and cattle were en 
gulfed in the cracks and in some in- 
stances thrown out again alive by the 
with great jets of 
and mini. 
Another remarkable instance of the 
ishness nf earthquakes occurred 
a; Semimdria, in Servia, when an ex- 
olive orchard was hurled by 
niie .if the shocks a distance of two 
hundred feet from a hillside into a 
valley sixty feet deep. A small house 
-landing on the land went with it 
without injury. 

There are a number of instances ill 
[hi- -late of the freakish character of 
earthquakes. Along the coast and as 
far southeast as Owens Valley, in 
in,, County, strange evidences of 
seismic disturbances arc observed by 
the intelligent traveler in quest of 
, in iw ledge. — Sacramento Union. 

* * * 

A Valuable DesK 
The desk at the White House at 
which Sir. Roosevelt does most of 
his writing is a very interesting piece 
of furniture. It was made from the 
timbers of the Resolute, the vessel 
which was sent in search of Sir John 
Franklin. The ship was caught in the 
ice and had to be abandoned. Some 
years later, however, s,he was dis- 
covered by an American whaler and 
extricated, and she was subsequently 
purchased by the then President and 
people of the United States and sent . 
to Queen Victoria as a token of good 
will and friendship. In an English 
dockyard the vessel was broken up, 
and from timber.- a desk was made. 
which was forwarded by the Queen 
to the American President, "as a 
memorial to the courtesy and loving 
kindness which dictated the offer of 
the gift of the Resolute." 

♦ ♦ * 

"Why Horses Shy and Donheys 
Don't 

A curious question in evolution was 
once put to a scientist prominent in 
the service of the Government. "Why 
is it." some one asked, "that horses 
shy and donkeys do not?" 

The answer was to the following 
effect: 

The ancestors of the horse were 
accustomed to roam over the plains, 
where every tuft of grass or bush 
might conceal an enemy wailing in 
ambush. In these circumstances they 
must have lime and again saved their 
lives by quickly starting back or else 



niy jumpin when 

must 

have indeed been a it 

ins that so many years of domi 

tiou h.M dicated il 

(In the other hand, the donkey is 
nded from animals thai lived 
among the hills, with the 

. on, declivities; 

and from these conditions, ii would 

appear, there resulted its slow 

llie d. inl 

or- were not, then, -n liabli to 

sudden attacks from wild beasts and 



. er, sudden ami wild 

would have bi ively 

cqucntly, they learned 

the charac ick of the i 



A Near-Right Answer 
Somi limns tiling, happen in 
schoolroom, A Brooklyn teaoher 
upon a -mall boy in define 

"llllllllM 

"A multitude," -aid the boy, "is 
whal we get when we multiply." — 

,l i ' 



The Misses Page 
Boarding and Day School 

Primary — Preparatory — High School 
Single Management but Separate in Location 



FOR BOYS 

137 West Adams Street 

Telephone Home 21203 

A splendid home for boys and 
also a well regulated school- 
home where the character train- 
ing of the boy is given the im- 
portance it deserves. The pro- 
verb "Train up the child in the 
way he should go; and when 
he is old he will not depart from 
it," is exemplified at this school. 
Boys here are taught manliness, 
obedience, punctuality, industry 
and learning in a way fitting 
them suitably as foundation 
stones for life's progress. Boys 
of any age after 5 years ad- 
mitted. Each boy is held to be 
an individual. Not being held 
back by class restrictions his 
progress is rapid and certain. 
Boys in addition to the regular 
school studies of our girls 
school are taught sloyd, mili- 
tary drill, vocal and instrumen- 
tal music, also the languages. 
The military department is in 
charge of Captain Robert A. 
G;bbs. 

The school has athletic field 
where boys are taught sports 
and military drill. 

William Himrod, graduate of 
Pomona College and Champion 
mile runner of Pacific coast, is 
in charge of boys' play and 
athletics. 

Call, Telephone or Write for Catalogue 

Pupils Admitted at Any Time 



FOR GIRLS 

243 West Adams Street 

Home Phone 21202 
Sanset South 3539 

Located like boys' school in one 
of most aristocratic residence 
sections of Los Angeles. The 
buildings are well adapted to a 
girls' school; wide verandas, 
upper balconies and beautiful 
grounds, set out to semi-tropical 
shrubbery. Miss Emma E. Page 
and Miss Delia M. Page, prin- 
cipals of these schools, are from 
Hiram College, Ohio, and both 
are Normal graduates. Miss 
Clara J. Armstrong, principal of 
the high school department, is 
a graduate of Oswego State 
Normal School, New York, a 
teacher whose exceptional abil- 
ity and experience along general 
educational lines is well known 
and established. 

Girls here are taught vocal 
and instrumental music, drawing 
and painting, physical culture, 
elocution; these in addition to 
regular school studies. 

Ample facilities are afforded 
for recreation and the girls' 
home training and moral wel- 
fare is attended to in a manner 
to bring out the sweet and beau- 
tiful in character, so essential to 
true womanhood. 



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Top Floor Grant Building 



C. C. Patterson, Secretary 
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10 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



AMUSEMENTS 



A Stubborn Cinderella 

Because of successive disappoint- 
ments, Los Angeles has grown cynical 
and skeptical regarding traveling mu- 
sical comedy companies, no matter 
how favorable their advanced notices 
may be. So "A Stubborn Cinderella" 
at the Mason this week has igiven 
us an unexpected pleasure. Here is 
a 'big kaleidoscopic production, extrav- 
agantly staged, with spectacular cos- 
tuming and gorgeous color schemes 
and yet with a tangible plot. The 
musical numbers by Joseph E. How- 
ard, though occasionally reminiscent 
of former favorites, are brisk and sat- 
isfying. Furthermore the company 
contains one woman who can sing, 
one man who can act, several people 
who can dance, and, most unusual of 
all, a chorus still young, actually 
pretty, lavishly dressed, very well 
drilled and not yet strident. For all 
this we are devoutly thankful. There 
are, of course, a few of those dread- 
ful moments when things drag and 
one wishes one had stsved at home. 




Florencs Roberts at the Majestic] 

and there are painful moments, too, 
as when a sentimental song is ren- 
dered badly out of tune. Sometimes, 
in their efforts to keep the tempo from 
lagging, the men in the company 
speak so rapidly that many lines good 
for a laugh lose their effect. 

Homer B. Mason, who plays Mac, 
is wholesome and manly, and so nat- 
ural, so thoroughly at ease on the 
sta'ge, that he makes every one feel 
happy and comfortable. Ethel Dorey 
has a pretty face, a passaible voice and 
a fetchingly affected little way with 
her. Grace Edmond's Lady Leslie is 
a distinctly charming creation, naive, 
wide-eyed and altogether adorable. 
Her work has the subtle simplicity of 
true art. 

A Revival of "The Girl" 

"The Girl of the Golden West" is 
a compelling drama that holds the 
attention throughout the performance 
in spite of a certain lack of compact- 
ness. The first act might be com- . 



pressed a little to advantage. It at- 
temps too much local color which is 
interesting enough in. itself, but which 
lengthens the piece unduly. The play 
probably will remain a popular one, 
however, for a long time because its 
theme is a notale one. In the presence 
of Jack Ranee, the sheriff, and of Ram_ 
erez, the road agent, are contrasted 
the love which seeks possession and 
the love which seeks response and is 
therefore a regenerating force. The 
playwright has succeeded in putting 
someting of the elation of mountain 
air into the scenes and the play of 
passion is relieved at every step by a 
sense of humor and by comic combi- 
nations that mock at austerity; for it 
is through laughter that we escape 
our limitations, self imposed. The 
central figures are Ramerez, the man 
who discards the impediments of fate; 
the sheriff, whose will is bent to the 
service of appetite; and the girl whose 
ideals are better than she knows. The 
value of the play is that it deals with 
elemental forces and primitive condi- 
tion that everybody can understand. 
It embodies a rude justice and mercy 
that we all believe in. For after all 
mercy is ibetter than justice, and pun- 
ishment is 'but a makeshift and cow- 
ardly remedy for human error. We 
cannot enlighten ignorance either 
by killing it. or imprisoning it or whip- 
ping it. Some day perhaps instead 
of sending felons to jail we will take 
them to our homes. 

Mr. Stone infuses great charm and 
nobility into the character of the road 
agent.- He shows in Ramerez the ov- 
erflow of energy, while Howard Scott 
with 'great skill paints in Ranee cur- 
rents of power damned -by sinister mo- 
tives. Miss Oakley is perhaps a trifle 
over dainty as the girl but she shows 
in this role greater depth of feeling 
than in any part that she has lately 
been seen in. The rest of the com- 
pany leaves little to be desired. 
Charles Ruggles makes 'a good Jose 
and DeVWtt Jennings is excellent as 
Sonora Slim. The play is well worth 
a second week's run. 



Shakespeare a'j the Majestic 
M'f. Charles B. Hanford and com- 
pany appeared in Shakespearian reper- 
toire at the Majestic this week, and 
fair houses prove that there are still 
devotees of the Bard and lovers of 
the old school of acting. Mr. Han- 
fnrd gives each play an adequate set- 
ting; indeed many of the stage pic- 
tures are sumptuous and beautiful. 
Mr. Hanford's arrangement of the 
great pastoral comedy, "The Winter's 
Tale," was the opening production, 
with music by Emil Mori and dances 
arraigned by Max Trostler. On Tues- 
day night Othello was presented with 
Mr. Hanford as the Moor, Miss Drof- 
nah as Desdemona, and Air. Kline as 
lago. The scene in the council cham- 
ber was like a Venetian picture by 
Bordone. Mr. Hanford's Othello 
made an impressive and dignified fig- 
ure and his clear enunciation was the 
best feature of the performance. Mr. 
Kline was an intelligently villainous 
lago, but gave his lines almost with- 
out pause and much too noisily. Miss 
Drofnah can no longer look the part 



of Desdemona and her stilted clecu- 
tionary delivery becomes monotonous 
at times. Mr. John J. Burk was a 
prepossessing Monatano. Miss Ger- 
trude Fowler, as Emilia, was attrac- 
tive looking but rather too shrill. Most 
of the company, though earnest and 
sincere, use a Middle West accent 
which jars upon the ears of those 
who love the beauty of Shakespeare's 
lines. 



"Raffles" 
This delightful play preaches such 
an easy going doctrine that it is bound 
to please a facile public. The gist 
of it is that you may do anything 
at all if you only do it civilly and well. 
There is dignity in misdemeanor when 
it becomes an art. Nothing is grace- 
less if it be graceful or at least that 
is the way you feel about it after see- 
ing "Raffles" which was given at the 
Burbank this week. Mr. Desmond 
fills the part easily, lacking only in the 
love making scenes which are perfunc- 
torily introduced into the play, appar- 
ently from the notion that the drama 
is valueless without some form of_ 
wooing. Captain Bedford was- well 
taken by Byron Beasley and the other 
parts were acceptably filled. The first 




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PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



and 

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DON 



A Second Week of "The Girt" 
nail) 

lit'T- 

ihat the management lia> depided to 

will i ncnicnt of 

New York 

I lie Girl of the Golden 

management was pretty certain 
that the play would occupy the 
for hut a single week. This opinion 
>ned by the unprecedented 
run of eight weeks enjoyed by the 
. play last spring at the Belas- 
co Tin 

This play is one that may be seen 

in each oc- 

and doubtless many theater 




Richard Vivian at the Belasco 

goers who saw Mr. Stone in the char- 
acter of the road agent will like to 
renew the impressions lie made in the 
part la-l year and see him again this 
season. 

"Mrs. Wiggs of the Cabbage Patch" 

There i- no gainsaying the extra- 
ordiinary popularity of "Mrs. Wiggs 
of the Cabbage Patch," fresh from its 
Australian triumph, which comes to 
the Mason Opera House Monday 
night It lias proven an inexhaustible 
fountain of mirth for amusement lov- 
"Mrs. Wiggs" has charms that 
soothe the most hardened theatre go- 
ers, and almost all .if the characters 
in the play are distinct and highly 
interesting types. Californians, in re- 
newing their acquaintanceship with 
Mrs. Wiggs. Lovey Mary. Mis' Hazy. 
Mr Stub.bius, Little Tommy and the 
other delightful characters of tin- play. 
find a common bond of sympathy and 
union. It is a piece which, because 
of its originality and Dickens-like 
Sweetness of humor, general wit and 
wholesome philosophy, appeal-, to all 
classes. The play itself clearly ful- 



fill- i 

ter. imbued with a wind, 

the quaint, 

motherly . is -coring the 

hit of her career in thi- part, so lull 
of heart inti 



"The Spoilers" Coming 
Manager Oliver Morosco of the 
Burbanh theater promise- an unusual 
and strong attraction next week, lie- 
ginning with a matinee performance 
tomorrow, in the first presentation in 
Los "The Spoilers." a 

melodrama out of Rex Beach's novel 
by Mr. Beach himself and James Mc. 
Arthur. A- a book "The Spoilers" 
stood high among the "Six Best Sell 
ers." As a play it- success has been 
scarcely less remarkable. In proof 
if its supei ii ir ' 1 1 1 . 1 1 1 1 > "'I'll.- Spoilers" 
was si - the in, ina -i/iinut of 

-: i's endowed theater lor presen 
tation at that house, l-ike so many 
-ther scheme- of similar purport the 
theater failed, but the play did nol. 
It was presented subsequently in New 
Yoik where the reviewer of the 
'Theater Magazine" said of it: "'The 
Spoilers' possessed freshness, virility 
ind authenticity, and there is a marked 
individuality in the authorship. It is 
the best play we have had of Western 
life. Its 'Girl of the Golden. North' 
promises at the outset to be the best 
of them all." The critics of the daily 
pre-- commented enthusiastically 
tipon the play, upon its truthful pic- 
ture of Alaskan life and upon the 
Strength of its character drawings and 
the dramatic quality of its construc- 
lii ni. 

Rex- Beach is familiar with the coun- 
try, the people and the conditions of 
which he writes. He was himself an 
Alaskan for a time and was an active 
participant in several scenes which are 
introduced in his play. The story in- 
volves a legal fight for the ownership 
of a valuable mining property, to- 
gether with a love tale of more than 
usual interest.' "The Spoilers" is a 
red blocd play of life in a frontiei 
c immunity, under frontier conditions. 
It is melodrama because life there was 
melodramatic. 



The third of Bruce Gordon Kings- 
ley's Opera Recitals will take place 
tomorrow afternoon in Blanchard 
Hall. The oipera illustrated at this 
time will be "Faust." Two more re- 
citals follow on succeeding Sundays. 
They are "The Ring" and "Parsifal." 



Prof. Baumgart lectures tomorrov 
night in Symphony Hall on Naples. 
+ + * 

MUSIC 



The Ellis Club Concert 

The Ellis Club gave the second con- 
cert of its season last Tuesday even- 
ing The men sang with their usual 
precision of attack and tonal clarity. 
Especially was this true in the lullaby 
ol I'rothero. "De Sandman." A pleas- 
ing contrast was presented in the De 
lxovcn Serenade, which closed the first 
part, in the singing of Mrs. Tiffany, 
her sweet soprano notes soaring out 



>l the men. 
Hut the rial work 

the Dudley Buck cantata. "The 

. tenor and 

- and nun'- chorus. The 

la-t grand chorus of Thank-giving 

-bowed the full power of the club in 

depth and breadth of feeling and tonal 

ity Tin- -tring orchestra a< 

JUSI the hrilliai,. 
1 The solo work wa- well sua 

tained throughout by Mr. I. II \n 
drew- a- the Priest, Mr. Nigel de Bru 
Iter a- Columbus, Mr. X P. Sessions 

and Mr. C. It. Peterson as officers. 
Mr. Sesisons's delightful tenoi ws 
idmi ilj suited to the w at m 

c i. iing nf the Andalu-ian Serenade, 
Mi- enunciation was exceptionally 

clear and hi- voice flexible and Force 

fill. 

Mrs. Willis N. Tiffany gave first 
\ California Night Song." with 'cel- 
lo oldi-.iio played by Miss Lucy Fuh- 
rer. and later sang altogether charm- 
ingly and with more surety of inlona- 
i ni "Selveig's Lied." 

The Krauss Quartet .played most 
delicately Tschaikowsy's Andante 
Cantabile and Dunkler's "An bord de 
la Mer." The only regret was that 
they could not give us an entire even- 
ing. 

It is safe to say that 'Miss O'DonOU.g 
hue is the most popular adjunct to the 
club, -but why must her poor piano 
suffer the ignominy of having its lid 
taken off? 

G. B. 



Ragtime Contest 

The ears of the old walls of Simp- 
son Auditorium were no doubt in- 
wardly tickled at the unaccustomed 
lilt and rythm of hist week's rag-time 
entertainment. Manager Behymer usu- 
ally .provides for that hall something 
farremovedfrom vaudeville. Neverthe- 
less the audience was truly delighted 
and proved its good judgment by pick- 
ing Walter Wilson as the best dancer. 
Gene de Bell as' the most finished 
"coon-shouter," and Edward Barnes 
as master ra-,g-time player. 



Death of Local Composer 
Margaret Lucia Mabrey is dead. 
Mrs. Mabery's unique charm of per- 
sonality pervades the .musical compo- 
sitions which made her widely known 
though still in her youth. She was as 
gloriously beautiful as some rare tro- 
pical flower. Among the songs pub- 
lished by Schirmer and Oliver IDHtson 
are "Go Lovely Rose," "Shadows," 
"Oh the Blue Hills" (often sung here- 
by Esielie Heartt Dreyfus) and the 
profoundly dramatic "Pity My Sor- 
row." Perhaps her must popular 
composition was her exquisite lyrical 
"Song of the Nightingale," set to the 
Christine Rossetti's words. 



The Symphony Orchestra, Feb. 5 

Mr. Hamilton's fourth concert is 
one of particular interest commem- 
orating, as it does, Mendelssohn's 
birth one hundred years ago this year. 
Orchestras and clubs the world over 
are playing his music at this time, the 
finest tribute to his genius that they 
can pay him. Mr. Hamilton has in 



II 
pa-t concerts 

known work and now ..if, 
concert overture "lleimkehr ail 
Fremde" and the second symphony 
in l: il.it (called the 
"Hymn ol The first three 

movements are in well-di 

lii m. .,h- hut the fourth combines 
chorus and -id,, voices with orchestra, 

like tin- great ninth of Bcetl 

I'ln- fourth movement i- . ibi 
impossible of performance 
nil.' ... come, althoug imber 

o i -ii :rce i- don ling in 

it- power to help chorus matter? 
along. 

Mm.- I ,ni-, M.1..1 if. to bi heard on 
Tuesday night in concert, i- to sing 
the aria " \ mon til-" from Meycr- 
l. er's "l.e Prophete" and Tschail 
sky's magnificent "Farewell to the 
Hills" from bis opera "Joan of Arc". 
The program is arranged as Follows' 

Secnd Symphony in I! Hat 

Mendelssohn 

Maestoso con moto Allegro 
Allegretto mi poco agitato 
Adagio religioso 
Aria from the Prison Scene (Lc 

Propiiete) Meyerbeer 

Mme. Langendorff 
Overture "Heimkehr an- der Frem- 
de Mendelssohn 

Farewell to the Hills (Jeanne d'Arcf 

Tschaikowsky 

Mine. Langendorff 

Suite "Sizurd Jorsalfar" Grieg 

Vorspiel— (In the King's Hall) 
Intermezzo — (Borghildo's ID-ream) 
Huldigung's March Wagner 



Philharmonic Ccncert 

Mme. Langendorff will give one 
concert in Los Angeles at Simpson 
Auditorium on Tuesday evening, Feb- 
ruary 2nd and comes as the fourth 
event on the Great Philharmonic 
iCourse. Her program is one that will 
be of interest to all music lovers con- 
taining compositions by all the stand 
ard composers — Beethoven, Meyer- 
beer, Rubinstein and Saint- Saens — not 
oi mention several selections of Mr. 
La Forge, whose compositions were 
so excellently rendered by Mme. Gad- 
ski a few weeks ago. The complete 
program follows: 

1. Aria "Ah! mon fils" from De 

Prophete" Meyerbeer 

2. Die Himmel ruhmen ... Beethoven 
Es Blinkt der Thau. . . .Rubinstein 
Der Lenz Hildach 

3. The cry of Rachel T. Salter 

4. O dry those tears.. Telma de Rigo 

Still as the night Bohm 

A Song of April T. Salter 

5. Ave Maria Gounod 

The Retreat La Forgo 

Adoration Telma de Rigo 

Sweetheart thy lips are touched 

with flames Chadwick 

7. Aria from "Samson et Dalila" 

Saint -Sacns 



Archibald Sessions's Organ Recital 
Another Mendelssohn program will 
be given by Mr. Sessions at Christ 
Church Wednesday evening. Mr, 

Abraham Miller, tenor, will sing two 
aria- from the Hymn of Praise, al- 
ready mentioned in the Symphony 



12 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



program. The rest of the program 

follows: 

Sixth Sonata (Choral) .. .Mendelssohn 

Morning Mood and Ase's Death 

(Peer Gynt) Grieg 

Offertoire in B flat Salome 

Fugue in G minor Krebs 

Wedding Song and Serenade. .Jensen 
Grand Chorus in D major. ..Guilmant 

* * * 

FORTHCOMING EVENTS 

(Jan. 30 to Feb. 6) 
Theatres Next Week 

Auditorium — "Little Red Riding 
Hood". 

Belasco — "The Girl from the Golden 
West". 

Burtiank — "The 'Spoilers". 

Grand — "Tar and Tarter". 

Majestic — "The House of Bondage". 

Mason — "Mrs. Wiggs of the Cab- 
bage Patch". 

Exhibitions 

Blanchard Hall Gallery. Jean Mann- 
heim — Portraits and Landscapes. 
Meetings and Lectures 

Today (Saturday, Jan. 30.)— City. 
Club, Hotel Westminster, 12:15 p. m. 

Playground No. 1, Violet St. "Care 
of the Body", illustrated lecture, L. M. 
Terman, 8 p. m. 

Playground No. 2, Echo Park. 
Gymnastic exhibition, L. A. High 
School, Dr. Beach, S p. m. 

Playground No. 3, St. John St. En- 
tertainment iby Students of St. Vin- 
cent's High School, 8 p. in. 

Athletic events for records at three 
playgrounds, afternoon. 

Collectivist Club, Hotel Westmin- 
ster, 6:30 p. m. 

Sunday, Jan. 31. — Symphony Hall. 
"Naples, and the Shores of Paradise", 
Prof. B. R. Baumgardt, 8 p. m. 

Blanchard Hall, Opera Recitals by 
B. G Kingsley, "Faust", 3 p. m. 

Monday, Feb. 1. — ,Board of Public 
Works, 9 a. m. 

Finance Committee, 10 a. m. 

Music Hall, Pupils' Recital, R. J. 
Polak, 8 p. m. 

Ebell Club, 1 p. m. Parliamentary 
Law: 'Mrs. Osgood, 2:30 p. m. Busi- 
ness meeting and "Old Thought vs. 
New Thought", Dr. C. F. Montgom- 
ery. 

iColegrove Board of Trade, Cole's 
Hall, 7:30 p. m. 

Academy of Science, Symphony 
Hall, 8 p. m. "The Work of the Mt. 
Wilson Solar Observatory", Prof. G 
E. Hale. 

Board of Supervisors, 8:30 a. m. 

Water Commission, 3:30 p. m. 

Board of Education, 7:30 p. m. 

Monday Musical Club, 2:15 p. m. 
Tuesday, Feb. 2.— Blanchard Hall, 
Woman's Orchestra rehearsal, 3 p. m. 

Symphony Hall, Lyric Club rehear- 
sal, 2 p. m. 

Gamut Clubhouse, Orpheus Club 
rehearsal, 8 p. m. 

Board of Supervisors, 9:30 a. m. 

City Council, 1:30 p. m. 

Civil Service Commission, 4:30 p. m. 

Ebell Club, Expression, "The Over- 
Soul", Mrs. W. L. Jones, 10:30 a. m. 
French classes. 

Highland Park Ebell, Masonic Hall, 
Business meeting and Parliamentary 
drill, Mrs. Osgood, 10 a. m. 



United Improvement Association, 
Chamber of Commerce, 8 p. m. 

Philharmonic Concert, Simpson's 
Auditorium, 8:15. 

Wednesday, Feb. 3. — Park Commis- 
sion, 10:30 a. m. 

Ruskin Art Club, Current Art Notes. 

Board of Directors, Chamber of 
Commerce, 3 p. m. 

Board of Health, 4 p. m. 

Ebell Club, "Hamlet", Mrs. F. W. 
Johnson, 10 a. m. 

Organ recital, Christ Church, 8:15, 
Mr. A. Sessions. 

Thursday, Feb. 4. — Fire Commission 
10: 30 a. m. 

Ebell Club, "Rembrandt," Mrs. A. 
Barlow, 10 a. m. 

Friday, Feb. 5. — Supply Committee, 
10 a. m. 

Board of Public Works, 2 p. m. 

'Housing Commission, 4:30 p. m. 

■Music Hall, Song Recital, Mrs. 
Fowler. 

Symphony Hall, Vocal Recital by 
Pupils of Sig. Buzzi, 8:15. 

Auditorium, Symphony Concert, 
Mine. Langendorff, soloist, 3 p. m. 

Friday Morning Club,, "Is Vice 
Protected in Los Angeles?" T. E. 
Gibbon, "The Recall." 

Parent Teachers' Association of 
Hollywood. Lecture by Prof. H. Al- 
liot. 

Saturday, Feb. 6.— City Club. 

College Woman's Club, Gamut Club 
House, "Duty of College Women", 
Mrs. M. W. Park, 2:30 p. m. 

* <• * 

LITERARY NOTES 



By Perbz Field 

In "The Twentieth Century Ameri- 
can" H. Perry Robinson has written 
an unusually well-informed study of 
the Anglo-Saxon and his tempera- 
ment as manifested in Great Britain 
and the United States. It is a care- 
ful appreciation of the conditions in 
both countries. Mr. Robinson is an 
Englishman who has lived for twenty 
years in this country. The pages of 
this book show that he is a keen ob- 
server. 

He makes a plea for an Anglo- 
American alliance. He says: "Tiler; 
is one Power in Europe whose am- 
bitions are a menace to the peace of 
the world — one only". That power is 
Germany. "There is only one in- 
strumentality, humanly speaking — on'; 
Power — which can ultimately prevent 
Germany using that army and that 
fleet for the ends for which they are 
being created; and that instrumental- 
ity happens to be the United States. 
If the United States should range her- 
self definitely on the side of peace, 
forming a compact with England for 
the .purpose, the venture which Ger- 
many contemplates would become 
preposterous." 

In speaking of the difficulties of the 
traveler in understanding a foreign 
people he says: "When I first went 
to the United States I carried with mo 
a commission from certain highly re- 
putable English papers to incorporate 
my 'impressions' in occasional letters. 
Among the earliest facts of any mo- 
ment which I was enabled to com- 



municate to English readers was that 
the middle classes in America (I was 
careful to explain what the 'middle 
classes' were in a country where none 
existed) — that the middle classes, I 
say, lived almost entirely on parsnips. 
I had not arrived at this important 
ethnological fact with undue haste. I 
had already lived in the United 
States for some three months, half of 
which time had been spent in New 
York hotels' and boarding houses and 
half in Northern New York and rur.-il 
New England, where, staying at farms 
or at the houses of families in the 
smaller towns to which I bore letters 
of introduction, I flattered myself 
that I had probed deep — Oh, ever so 
deep — t>elow the surface and had come 
to understand the people as they lived 
in their homes. And my ripened judg- 
ment was that the bulk of the well- 
to-do people of the country supported 
life chiefly by a consumption of par- 
snips. 

"Some fifteen years later I was at 
supper at the Century Club in Ne» 
York. Montgomery Schuyler and 
John La Farge were present. They 
had been to Europe that year — La 
Farge to -pay his first visit to Italy, 
while Schuyler, whether with or with, 
out La Farge I forget, had made a 
somewhat extensive trip through rural 
England in, I think, a dog-cart. The 
conversation ran chiefly on their ex- 
periences and suddenly Schuyler 
turned to me with: Here, you Eng- 
lishman, why do the middle classes of 
England live chiefly on parsnips?' 
The thing is incredible — except that 
it happened." 

There is one root-fact, Mr. Robin- 
son says, which is disturbing and con- 
founding to casual observers. It .s 
the fact that a much larger part in 
the intellectual life of the country is 
played by women in America than is 
the case in England. "A familiarity 
with art and letters is not commonly 
regarded by Englishmen as an essen- 
tial possession in a wife. The lack 
of it is certainly not considered by 
the American woman a cardinal of- 
fence in a husband. I know many 
American, men who, on being con- 
sulted on any matter of literary or 
artistic taste, say at once: 'I don't 
know. I leave all that to my wife.' 

"An Englishman in an English 
house, looking at the family portraits, 
may ask his hostess who painted ,". 
certain picture. 

" 'I don't know,' she will say, 'I 
must ask my husband.' 'Will, who is 
the portrait of your grandfather by — 
the one over there in his robes?' 

" 'Raelburn,' says Will. 

" 'Of course,' says the wife. 'I 
never can remember the artists' 
names; they are so confusing — espe- 
cially the English ones.' 

"The Englishman thinks no worse 
of her; but the American woman, lis- 
tening, wishes that she had a portrait 
of her husband's grandfather by Rae- 
burn and opines that she would 
know the artist's name. 

"The same Englishman goes U 
America and, being entertained, asks 
a similar question of his host. 

" 'I don't know,' says the man, 'I 



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PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



13 



into. I 
that i r there — the hi* 

and the bin 

.ml. I 

the nami 

nix me all ui> 

man returning 

hom he dined over th 

u know' 

ally paint- 

mil tli in ,;> -ami did 
the names of th< 
>-k his wife, by Jove' " 

ui international 

Britain 

and the United States have it in their 

hands to give to the whole world no 

Mian that of Universal and 



mas Hardy, the well-known 
list, in replying to the invitation 
of the Uni ginia to at- 

tend its celebration of Poe's ci 

ary. adds this estimate of the Ameri- 
can poet: 

"Now that the lapse of time has re- 
duced the insignificant and pettj 

tail- of his life to their true propor- 
tion beside the measure of his poetry 

and softened the horror of correct 
classes at his lack of respectability, 
that fantastic and romantic genius 
shows himself in all his rarity. lli- 
qualities. which would have been ex- 
traordinary anywhere, are much more 
extraordinary for an American of his 
date. Why one who was in many 
way- disadvantage! lusly circumstanced 
for the development of art and poetry. 
should have been the first to realize 
to the full the possibilities of the 
English language in rhyme and alliter- 
ation is not easily explicable." 



A very amusing book has just been 
brought out by Mr. Millaud. Senator 
for the Rhone, entitled "Pctites 
in which he gives his impres- 
sions of various characters, from Hor- 
tensius, the rival of Cicero, down to 
M Lepine. His notices of historical 
celebrities are full of wit an.d erudi- 
tion, but his personal recollections 
of well-known contemporary figures 
will appeal more to the general reader. 

Barthelemy St. Hilaire. whom -Mil 
laud calls "the last bourgeois of the 
Third Republic," fills several pages. 
His conception of the Jewish race is 
original. He declared it to be "the 
purest, the most noble, the most 
clearly marked by the finger of God. 
Never conquered, always erect, as 
courageous as it is resigned, no less 
animated by the breath of liberty 
than by that of justice, Israel shines 
in the world like a torch through the 
ages." And in answer to a question 
as to whether the Jews ought to re- 
nounce their faith, St. Hilaire wrote 
a long reply, concluding as follows: 

"The Christians arc the -'"is of the 
Jews. It becomes not the children to 
call upon their fathers to change their 
religion. Every law of exception 
against the Jews — every persecution 
or forcible conversion, and all lack of 
consideration toward the Hebrew race 



and i gratitude." 

Th, 

I animals: 

"1 have lived much in th, 
animals .: -. hones, 

-. and hens. They have all I 
me devotion, resignation, and til 

of silent observation. Beasts talk, but 

are not noisy, except to make plain', 
or more often to warn mankind of 
danger. Tiny see about I hems, he- 
ami us what exists probably without 
our discerning it In the farm where 
1 am ending my modest career my 
best companion i- a goat. She has 
told me many a secret, and given me 
the glimpse of a key to many mj 
teries. 

The Century Company has printed 
a second edition of "Days Spent on 

- Farm", which comes from the 
pen of the daughter of John Adding- 

ii! Symonds. It is in part a storj 
"f a great estate near Venice, which 
had been worked by the Pias Pisanis. 
A countess of the family had great 
courage, which was tested sometimes, 
as is shown in a scene one autumn 
night : 

It had poured and poured with rain 
for many days, and always it went on 
l)i Hiring. Up in the Alps the torrents 
had broken loose and were hurling 
down their Moods and bowlders over 
the meadows. 

The Adige was swollen, yellow. 
ghastly, but still, by its banks 1 , re- 
strained. A dread and a terror were 
in the minds of the people on the 
plain. They went up in the evening 
to the top of the banks and looked. 
Then they crept down, for a shudder 
passed through them. And still it 
poured. 

At midnight a gig rattled up to the 
gates of a lonely villa on the plain. 

"The river has broken on the Ro- 
vigo side." said the man inside. "The 
people are mad — they are coming 
acmss to open our lock, and let the 
flood into our land as well as their 
own. It's a horrible flood — tout why 
should both sides perish?" 

The lady of the villa arose. She 
ordered her horses, and she drove 
through the dark and the blinding 
rain. At dawn she stood on the 
banks of the Adige beside her lock. 

She was- a woman, but she stood 
there alone. And "Shoot, shoot, 
shoot!" she cried to the men on the 
opposite bank of the river. 

They were all there, half-mad with 
fear. They had their guns pointed at 
her. but they didn't shoot, and the 
flood went over their lands and not 
over hers. 

In the daylight the lady went back 
to her villa, and the troops came 
down from Milan and guarded her 
locks. 

The fields of Gromboolia were dry. 

As a young girl the author of this 
chronicle spent much time with the 
countess, and she describes con 
amor the house full of beautiful 
things, the old portraits, the exquisite 
gardens, the incidents of local farm- 
in:, the ways of the country people, 
and the excursions into the mountains. 
It is a book which deserves a place. 



nenl il modest, 
rapidly accumulating - Italy 

in the last century. 

Rich iallienne, in speaking 

of the use of stimulants, said in 

cent interview 

"Mall was born bored, lie -Hi 

ennui long before he is of age lie 
feds : i inistic re- 

lief from which appears m him the 
dead le> i 1 o [am 

ing no poets, but of all men 

— for it is the same in all of us, this 
craving for something different, this 
ity for a stimulant, an artiftci il 
help to the attainment of an eternal 
truth. Ami there I am, back to the 
problem with which I started: Whal 
stimulant -hail a man, be lie poet or 

dri j in. in. cl se to help lifl him out 

of his world-old ennui: 

"I have written as much as any one 
in my .generation, perhaps, in what 
you might call the praise of Bacchus. 
I am convinced that wine has. :n 
many a memorable instance, acted as 
a spur, an inspiration to the jaded wits 
of poets whose work, thanks to this 
artificial stimulus, will live 'forever. 
Nevertheless, of all that I have writ- 
ten I feel today most keenly the truth 
that I tried to express in 'Omar Re- 
pentant.' 

"Those who invoke the vinous god 
may enjoy the inspiration that they 
seek for a brief space; but in accept- 
ing this deity's aid they are entering 
upon a Mephistophelian contract the 
terms of which are inexorable and 
must be paid in the end with a man's 
life blood. I have sung the praise of 
rose gardens, of vine-clad grottoes, of 
bubbling wine — their modern equiva- 
lents appear to be the saloon and the 
cocktail. And from these latter there 
flows an inspiration that is deadly to 
the ethereal imaginings of poetic 
genius." 



The last edition of Burke's Peerage 
contains 2,570 pages. In the preface 
Ashworth P. Burke says: 

"The increase in the peerage in the 
last half century has been very great, 
but few will he prepared to accept the 
sweeping assertion made by a distill- 



'I an im- 
portant Government measure in 
Hon-, 'I find.' he 

'that half of tin 
in my lifetime ' A scrutiny of i 
vision list will not confirm tin accur- 

• 'i tin- statemi nl I in tin i 
sion in question I 
including 12 spiritual Lord-. ■.-. 
right lo vote cannot be sail 
on :i il \ in. Of thesi 

Ml only owe their seal - in ; he 
house to creation- made since the 
right honorable gentleman was born. 

in the early daj s of 1850; and some i il 
the latter 16, to be precise— were al- 
ready peers of much earlier creation 
in the peerages of Scotland and of 
Ireland. The Minister was doubtless 
misled in his estimate by the com- 
paratively recent dates of crcati.ni of 
some of the superior titles, and may 
have ranked, for instance, as peers of 
modern creation the Marquis of Aber- 
gavenny, raised to the marquessate in 
1876, wdiose barony of Bergavenny 
dates at any rate from 1450; the Earl 
of Ancaster, raised to an earldom in 
1892. whose barony of Willoughby 
de Eresby dates from 1313, or Vis- 
count Hampden, of the 1884 creation 
whose barony of Dacre dates from 
1321. ■ Possibly, however, the Minis- 
ter was thinking only of the ninety- 
six supporters of the measure, of 
whom more than one-half bear titles 
created in his lifetime." 



"Every country has a scent of its 
own, which a newcomer perceives 
once, or, at the most, twice, and then, 
like the odor of musk plant which no 



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14 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



man can smell three times in succes- 
sion, the scent of the land is lost, or 
becomes something which one knows 
without perceiving, something which 
is not in the senses, but in the sub- 
consciousness. So there is an aroma," 
says the London Academy, "possibly 
still more subtle, which clings to the 
thought of a country and makes its 
exiles hungry and wistful for the 
sound, the color, and the scent of the 
once familiar land. 

"Mathew Arnold has expressed 
this desire of return, this unrest of 
the exile, better than most other 
poets. It is most extraordinary that 
he should do so. He is not so melo- 
dious as Tennyson, so rich as Rossetli. 
so sincere as iClough, so passionate as 
Swinburne. Indeed, he is a limited 
poet, and he tried to 'be a stoic; of 
course, without success, for stoicism 
produces only a few short howls in 
the making, and nothing but silence 
when it is made." 

Readers who remember "The Col- 
umn" will tie .glad to hear that an- 
other novel toy the same author has 
just come from the press of John 
Lane. This new .book by Charles 
Marriott is called "The Kiss of 
Helen". Marriott's stories have not 
made a wide appeal but those Vhom 
they have touched they have touched 
deeply. 



New Books at the Public Library 
The First Nantucket Tea Partly is 

a show book beautiful illustrated and 
illuminated by Walter Tittle and pub- 
lished by Doubleday (1907— No. 917- 
449:3). 

The two other books on the list 
this week are technical ones. Alpine 
Flora of the Canadian Rocky Moun- 
'jains, by Steward son Brown, is an ad- 
mirably constructed manual of botany, 
rendered doubly serviceable by photo- 
graphs and colored plates. The value 
of the key to families is thus extended 
by picture-book comparison. (Put- 
nams, 1907— No. 581-971:1). Chemical 
Reagents, by E. Merck (Van Nos- 
trand, 1907— No. 543:10), is a transla- 
tion from the German. 

* * * 

Twin Monsters 

After an expenditure of $1,000,000 
the great steel double gantry which 
will be the cradle of the largest two 
steamships in the world has been fin- 
ished at the shipyards o'f Harland & 
Wolff, at Belfast, Ireland. The 
steamers whose keel blocks have 
been laid side by side in this the 
biggest gantry in, the world are the Tit- 
anic and the Olympic, 'of the White 
Star Line, and within a year or two 
these leviathans will be running be- 
tween New York and Southampton. 

'Soon after the two fast Cunarders, 
the Lusitania and the Mauretania, had 
demonstrated that one could travel in 
luxury and at a very high speed 
through the agency of turbine en- 
gines, the White Star Line announced 
that it would build two steamers to 
beat the Cunarders in length and 
breadth, and perhaps iu other ways 
also. It was reported at the time 
that the new White Star liners would 



be a thousand feet in length, but sub- 
sequently it was officially announced 
that they would be 900 feet long, with 
a beam of ninety feet. 

When it was decided to build them 
it was found that there was no gantry 
in the world big enough to accom- 
modate such monsters, and it was 
then that Harland- & Wolff began to 
rip up three of its largest gantries and 
build the huge steel and concrete 
cradle that is now ready to hold the 
Olympic and the Titanic. 

Before the steel structure which 
supports the powerful electric travel- 
ling cranes was erected a big con- 
crete base, twenty feet thick, was built 
upon spiles driven fifty feet into the 
ground. The concrete foundation, in 
addition to being more firm than the 
regular earthen base, has the ad- 
vantage of cleanliness, and tools and 
materials which may fall from the 
cranes in the course of construction 
may be found more readily. Parts of 
deck fittings and tools have fallen into 
the ground in gantries with earth 
bases and have not been recovered 
until the vessel has glided from its 
cradle into the water. 

The construction of the Olympic 
has been started. The keel of the 
Titanic will be laid soon, and visitors 
to the shipyards at Belfast will have 
an opportunity of' seeing the simul- 
taneous construction, side by side, of 
the largest two steamers in the world. 
The gantries are so built that any 
piece of material, however heavy or 
awkward, may be placed and held in 
whatever position the constructors de- 
sire. The gantries themselves are 
more than a thousand feet in length, 
208 feet high and something more 
than two hundred feet wide. 

♦ * ♦ 

No Harm Done 

"A distressing error found its "way 

into the paper this morning. Did you 

see it?" 

"Guess not. What was it?" 

"I wrote that the President's rnes- 

sage would have very little effect on 

the stock market." 
"Well?" 

"It was printed 'stork market.' " 
"Let it go. The public will think 

you meant it." — Cleveland Plain 

Dealer. 

4» 4» 4» 
Kaiser and the Scene-shifter 

A story is told in Berlin newspapers 
which places the Kaiser in a some- 
what curious light. A few days ago 
he visited a theater, and strolling be- 
hind the curtain became liberal of ad- 
vice to the manager, actors, and even 
scene-shifter, who listened in awed 
silence. Presently the Emperor 
lighted a cigar, puffing as he talked. 
On both sides of him were flimsy 
draperies, and on the floor heaps o'f 
paper. One of the scene-shifters 
stepped forward and pointed politely 
to a printed notice: "no smoking al- 
lowed." For a moment the Kaiser 
flushed, then, smiling, he put out his 
cigar, remarking as he did so: "Thank 
you, friend. It would be bad busi- 
ness if your Emperor taught you to 
disobey the law." 



The officers' mess was discussing 
rifle shooting. 

"I'll bet any one here," said one 
young lieutenant, "that I can fire 
twenty shots at two hundred yards 
and call each shot correctly, without 
waiting for the marker. I'll stake a 
box of cigars that I can." 

"Done!" cried a major. 

The whole mess was on hand early 
next morning to see the experiment 
tried. 

The lieutenant fired. 

"Miss,", he calmly announced. ■ 

A second shot. 

"Miss," he repeated. 

A third shot. 

"Miss." 

"Here, there! Hold on!" protected 
the major. "What are you trying to 
do? You're not shooting for the tar- 
get at all." 

"Of course not," admitted the lieu- 
tenant. "I'm firing for those cigars." 
And he got them. — Everybody's 
Magazine. 

* + '+ 

Russia's Anti-Hissing Law 

Russia is ruled by rigorous laws. 
The irony and humor o'f some of 
them come home to the foreign on- 
looker, while of course the Russians 
feel only the whip hand. The latest 
victim of an anti-kissing in public 
law is a famous and all too im- 
petuous Russian actress, Mile. Tre- 
poff, who actually had the temerity 
to kiss her mother in a tramcar. 

One would have thought even a 
magistrate or judge, or whoever ad- 
ministers cases of lawbreaking of that 



kind in Russia, would be melted by 
the beautiful picture of the reunion of/ 
a mother and daughter celebrated by 
a chaste salute, but Russians under- 
stand no jokes, says the Lady's Pic- 
torial; the fine of ten rubles (28s. 6d.) 
for a kiss in public conveyances, such 
as railways and tramcars, was vigor- 
ously enforced. 

A kiss in the street is penalized to 
the extent of seven rubles (19s. 10d.), 
and a declaration^ love sent by post- 
card, if anybody is brazen faced 
enough to do such a thing, is punished 
to the extent of five rubles (14s. 2d.). 

* * * 

A Bitter Fill 

Milly — And how does your brother 
take married life? 

Tilly — He takes it according to di- 
rections. His mother-in-law lives 
with them. — Illustrated Bits. 



He "Won 

Aunt Ann had come back on a visit. 

"Don't you keep any cats now, 
Bessie?" she asked. 

"No, auntie," said her little niece. 
"We haven't had a cat in the house 
since you went away." — (Chicago Trib- 
une. 



Didn't Mean It, Perhaps 

Captain of Signallers — G — G — G, 
what the deuce does the fellow mean? 
There's no word with three G's run- 
ning. 

Corporal — Reg pardon, sir, but Sig- 
naller Higgins he stutters! — Punch. 




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PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



15 



Jew* in Greater New Yorh 

i I he 

this m 

• 

'A the 

ater Sevi 

iw, Poland, ci mains 

the third 1 le\\>: 

klyn which 

I i'. being til in the 

1 Inly within the last fifteen years 

I1UI11- 

there 
wish name 
in the Brooklyn directory 

re .ir t - more Jews in Greater 
New Vork than in the Eur 

, Berlin, Vilna, Lem- 
Vmsterdam, and London all put 
ther. Ten per cent., in fact, of 
all the Jews in the world reside with- 
in the boundarie I New 
York. 

Dr. Joseph \ 
cently died in San Francisco, stated 
that in the whole of France there 
were only one-tenth as many Jew- as 
in Greater New York, and that 
er New York contained twenty 
times as mans' Jews as were to be 
found in the whole of Italy. If there 
are 1,061,282 of them in Greater Xew 
York, as Attorney Katz affirms, this 
would be fifteen time- more Jews 
than Syria and Palestine contain, and 
twenty-five times more than the en- 
tire population of Jerusalem, 
t * * 
Divorces, the Kamily fliller 
The census bureau has just made 
it- report on the marriages of the 
la-l twenty years. There have been 
nearly a million divorces, the aver- 
agi being one for every twelve mar- 
In some states the average 
i'.iter; in others less. Divorce 
increased in Massachusetts rather 
less than in most stmt- Neverthe- 
less, tve have gained seventeen di- 
ces for every 100,000 inhabitants. 
But, taking the country as a whole, 
divorces are increasing three limes as 
fast as the population. These are 
terrible facts Hiey strike at the 
very foundation of our national life. 
I he disruption of the family is a body 
blow at the mosl cherished of our in- 
stitute in - 

+ * + 

Limited Understanding 

"II does seem strange," remarked 
the part) who seemed to be thinking 
aloud. 

"What seems strange?" queried the 
innocent bystander, 

"Thai after getting a man into hot 
water a woman can't understand why 
he should boil over," plained the 
ni ' y thinker — Chicago Nev 



A Candid Critic 
Mr 

in Idaho. 

. and 

up, he casually inquii 
in: "Win. i- this author 

,h driver Up in the cattle 

you think of 

:ure President's 

"Well." 

dealer. "I've often thought I'd like 
t that author and tell him that 
if he'd stuck to running ranches, 

not tried to w ■ . he'd have 

heap bigger figure at hi- Hole, 
and been a bigger man." 

+ + + 

The Laziest Man 
1 day Bishi tp 1 ng ol I mdon 
ii d a parishoner who had married 
,i man who enjoj nl the reputation of 

1 i iesl man in the EaSI 

"Well. Mrs, Brown," be a-id, "I 
v i mr husfband is proving a go id 
provider." "Yes, sir, thauk yi iu, sir," 
-he replied, "he's provided me with 
three new places to work at since we 
w re married." 

■fr * + 
The Doctor and the Nurse 

"Ah, nurse," said the flippant young 
doctor io the old. grim-appearing 
nurse at the patient's door, "has the 
i aiient'- fever dropped since 1 was 
here yesterday?" 

"Yes, decidedly." 

"H'm, that's encouraging! And the 
oain?" 

"She hasn't am'." 

"Come, that's great! And the 
ci mgh?" 

"She doesn't cough at all now." 

'Well, you and 1 are to be congrat- 
ulated, nurse. My medicine litis taken 
effect, then?" 

"No doubt, sir." 

"Well," concluded the young doc- 
lor, inwardly calling down maledic- 
tions on the heads of all grim old 
nurses such as she, "there's hardh 
any need of my calling- here again, 
then?" 

"None whatever. The patient's 
lead." 

* * + 

At the Fair 

"We have here a series of dolls 

representing all states in life," said the 

fair vendor of toys at the charity 

bazar. "Now this one represents the 

e idea as a happy wife." 

"That doll ain't a good one to rep- 
n -.ni a happy "vife," said the vinegar- 
faced woman, pausing near. 

"Why not?" asked the surprised at- 
tendant. 

"Because she can't -hut her eves." — 
Baltimore American. 

.j. <{• * 

Eas- 

"Man will eventually go by rail 
from the Atlantic to the Pacific in 
two day-." 

"I once did ii iu five hours and 
then kicked about the slow time." 

"Where, pray, did this happen?" 

"In Panama." — Louisville "ourier- 
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Vol. VI. Mo. 6. 



Los JIngeles, California, February 6, 1909- 



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and right in human affairs — political, secular, 
commercial and industrial; and in its columns 
will always maintain an unprejudiced and im- 
partial attitude in its discussion of all subjects 
of universal or local interest. 

GEORGE BAKER ANDERSON. Editor 

COMMENT 



OFF WITH THE OLD! 



HAD ni. 1 the people of California become 
hardened to the biennial spectacle of Sacra- 
mento, an incident occurring last week 
would have had an astounding effect. The 
event to which we refer was the public hear- 
ing of the Walker-Otis Anti-Racetrack 
Gambling Hill Thursday evening in the 
senate chamber. The personnel of this com- 
mittee in itself should have been sufficient 
to warrant the conclusion well in advance 
that the bill would not be recommended 
favorably for passage ; and the hearing was 
regarded by the majority of people, and 
justly, as a formality which the committee 
was compelled to adopt by force of public 
sentiment, but which, as a matter of fact, 
would have no influence whatever upon its 
course in the matter. 

What was this spectacle? We hardly 
know how to characterize it. whether as 
farce, comedy or tragedy. 

Two features thereof should be perpetu- 
ated in the history of machine politics in 
California. Two features should be borne 
in mind, constantly, by the best citizenship 
of the state. Two features should be given 
a conspicuous place in the mental storehouse 
of everv voter of California. Here they are 



. \l>ner Weed, chairman of the commit 
sitting calmly in his seat, raising no hand or 

voice in protest or rebuke, heedless oi the 
commonest rules of courtesy, permitted 

"Tom" Williams, chief of the racetrack 

gamblers on the Pacific coast, grossly to in- 
sult not only one citizen who. upon Wil- 
liam's own imitation, asked him questions 
pertaining to the issue, but grossly and 
wantonly to heap abuse, vilification and 
superlative insult upon the entire body of 
clergy in America, excluding from his ar- 
raignment the Jewish Rabbi and the Ro 
man Catholic priest. Crimes unmentionable 
were attributed to these men of the cloth — 
crimes so low, he declared, that even he, 
"Tom" Williams, would not specify because 
of the presence of ladies in the senate cham- 
ber. And then, the most unthinkable and 
intolerable act of all. knowing the contents 
of tile document he was about to submit, it 
having been described in the course of Wil- 
liam's remarks, and knowing also that the 
information it contained was absolutely ir- 
revelant and impertinent, having no bearing 
upon the question under discussion than a 
paper on the declesion of the north pole or 
the navigation of a battleship. Weed grace- 
fully permitted this document to become a 
part of the record of this hearing! 

'["his act in itself was sufficient to damn 
eternally the course of the Senate Committee 
on Public Morals on this question — for no 
member had the decency to' protest against 
the reception of so utterly foreign a docu- 
ment as an attack upon Christian ministers 
at a hearing on the subject of racetrack 
gambling, bookmaking and poolselling. 

( me other feature of this gathering, in 
many respects the most remarkable and even 
the most sensational in the history of poli- 
tics in California, was the course of Frank 
W. Leavitt, himself one of the chief bene- 
ficiaries of the Emeryville racetrack. The 
writer has attended many public hearings 
on important measures before legislative 
committees in various states, but never has 
he witnessed or heard of such a proceeding 
as that evidently sanctioned by the com- 
mittee when it permitted Senator Leavitt to 
act as prompter of the witnesses against the 
bill. A legislative committee, we take it, is 
an impartial body, to a certain extent, a 
judicial committee. It is presumed to be a 
body appointed by one house or the other 
nf the legislature for the purpose of investi- 
gating as fully as may lie necessarv into am- 
question coming before it for consideration, 
that it may report the result of such investi- 



gation to the appointing authority. Instead 
of operating along this line, the committee 
sat supinely by. obviously 1>\ prearrange- 

ment, and permitted one of its members, 
Leavitt, t" assume the attitude of attorney 

for the racetrack touts and gamblers. 

It is beyond belief that such action as that 
would pass by without a roar of protest 0:1 
the pari of the people in almost any other 
slate in the Union ; but Californians have 
become so hardened to the mendacity and 
arrogance of the Southern Pacific railroad 
machine and other interests wholly or partlv 
under its direction and patronage — at least, 
encouraged by or affiliated with it — that the 
action of Leavitt and the committee in this 
respect has been taken as a matter of course. 

What an indescribable shame is it to the 
great state of California that one of the 
most important committees of the principal 
house of the legislature should descend to 
such unworthy and intolerably disgraceful 
tactics as those to which we have referred ! 
But, thank God, there is little prospect that 
an incident of this nature will occur in legis- 
lative halls of this state after the year 1909. 
A new order of things is arising and the 
Leavitts and the Weeds and their ilk will 
have no place therein. 

♦ + ♦ 

LAW BY THE PEOPLE 



UNTIL this lime the chief measure be- 
fore the State Legislature has been directed 
at the racetrack gamblers in California. Now 
that the success of the Walker-Otis bill has 
been assured, it is time that the attention of 
the legislature should be directed toward 
the next important piece of legislation de- 
sired by the people. 

In the opinion of the Pacific Outlook, the 
most important proposal now before the 
legislature — yes, the most important ever 
before the legislature — is the constitutional 
amendment providing for direct legislation, 
or the Initiative, introduced into the senate 
by Mr. Black and into the assembly by Mr. 
Drew. We say that this is the most im- 
portant piece of legislation and we believe 
that statement is susceptible of complete 
proof. Let us see. 

Let us suppose, for instance, that the legis- 
lature had failed to enact into law the race- 
track gambling bill. We have no doubt 
that if a pool of the voters of California 
should be taken at this time, it would show 
that nine out of ten citizens favor a drastic 
law prohibiting racetrack gambling in anv 
form. This is the way the people feel. But 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



the people, unfortunately, are not the legis- 
lators. The majority of the members of the 
legislature would vote without further dis- 
cussion for such a measure as that which 
has been consuming the time and attention 
of that body since the opening- of the ses- 
sion, were they not fearful of the adoption 
of severe punitive measure by the imitation 
bosses (we say "imitation" bosses because 
of the fact that the past month has proven 
conclusively that the real bosses in Califor- 
nia are the people), but, amazing as it may 
appear, it has been only after the hardest 
fight, the heaviest pressure, and, in some 
cases, unspoken but in some way expressed 
threat of political disaster, that the safety of 
the bill has been insured. 

Now, what would happen if the people 
themselves had in their hands the power to 
initiate legislation — in other words, to pass 
a law which the legislature itself refused to 
pass? Suppose that the present legislature 
had turned down the racetrack bill but would 
give to the people the Initiative. Does any- 
body question the assertion that the first 
measure which the people themselves would 
insist upon taking to the polls would be this 
very racetrack gambling bill? Does any- 
body question the assertion that the majority 
in favor of that bill would be the greatest 
majority ever rolled up for any measure 
submitted to the people of California? 

"The rights of the people are safe with 
the people." This is the motto adopted by 
the Direct Legislation League of California, 
which drafted and is supporting the consti- 
tutional amendments introduced by Senator 
Black and Mr. Drew. Every member of 
the legislature must go on record on this 
measure before adjournment of this session 
of the legislature. The Pacific Outlook 
makes the prediction that few, if any, of 
those members who oppose this amendment 
will be returned to the legislature. If any 
member decline to assent to the proposition 
that the rights of the people are safe with 
the people, he probably will be compelled 
to' admit, after the next election, that the 
people do not believe that the rights of the 
people are safe with a legislator who has no 
confidence in his own constituents. 
* * * 
THE PEOPLE'S "LOBBY" 



THERE may be some who will accuse 
the Pacific Outlook of partiality if it under- 
takes to discuss, even briefly, the merits of the 
controversy between a certain clique in the 
assembly of our honorable state legislature 
and the People's Legislative Bureau, which, 
through the activities of a large number of 
friendly newspapers, has become better 
known throughout the state under the name 
of the People's Lobby. 

We say that some may suspect this paper 
of partiality in the matter, because of the 
fact that the active head of the People's 
Lobby happens to be the editor of the Pa- 
cific Outlook. It should be hardly, neces- 



sary, therefore, for the Pacific Outlook to 
explain that it has been with considerable 
hesitancy that this paper has touched upon 
the matter in any way whatever. 

Since the establishment of the People'? 
Lobby, four issues of this paper have been 
published with no reference to that institu- 
tion or its work. But inasmuch as a mis- 
apprehension seems to exist in some quar- 
ters on account of the unfriendly attitude of 
a Los Angeles daily newspaper having some 
circulation, we presume, among the intelli- 
gent readers of this paper, we believe that 
the time has come for us to make a brief 
statement of the purposes of this bureau,, 
and the work thus far accomplished. 

The idea of the People's Lobby as 
it has been called, had its inception more 
than a year ago. It is supported by a 
large number of citizens of California, many 
of whom are known from one end of the 
state to the other as advocates of good gov- 
ernment and of clean, practical politics. It 
happens that it was organized under the 
auspices of members of the Direct Legisla- 
tion League of California, which is responsi- 
ble for the constitutional amendment pro- 
posing- to place the Initiative in the hands 
of the people. The People's Lobby, how- 
ever, is not lobbying for this measure nor 
for any other measure. Its work has been, 
and will continue to be, chiefly one of pub- 
licity. It aims to collect all the information 
it can in regard to the attitude of members 
of the legislature on important matters com- 
ing before that body ; to make a permanent 
record of their votes on important measures 
for the benefit of the whole people ; to pub- 
lish these records in a weekly bulletin which 
it has called the Legislative Record ; to pre- 
pare for those daily and weekly newspapers 
of the state which desire them letters de- 
scriptive of the progress of events in Sacra- 
mento; but the most important feature of 
its work, in our judgment, is the tabulation, 
in convenient form, of the vote of the mem- 
bers on matters vitally affecting the welfare 
of the state. 

Inasmuch as this weekly bulletin is being- 
placed in the hands of practically all the 
newspapers, civic organizations and public 
libraries of the state, its utility cannot be 
questioned. Many a man will be grateful to 
the People's Lobby for this compilation be- 
cause his record will be put up in such con- 
venient form as to be readily accessible to 
his constituents ; and we fear that a few men 
will be lacking gratitude because the Peo- 
ple's Lobby has imprinted their records in- 
delibly in the political annals of the state. 

The recent stir in the assembly over the 
action of the secretarjr of this bureau in 
asking certain members if they would be 
willing to give their reasons for their ab- 
sence when a poll was being taken upon an 
important issue was wholly unwarranted. 
At no time has there been any disposition 
on the part of the bureau to put any member 
of the legislature "in a hole." But a guilty 



conscience needs no accuser and in all prob- 
ability some of the members who were so 
touchy because of the inquisitiveness of the 
People's Lobby were fearful that their affili- 
ations with hitherto dominant political ele- 
ments inimical to the welfare of the state 
will be given too much attention. 

The men whose action are above reproach 
most assuredly have nothing to fear from 
the People's Lobby. Men whose actions are 
not above reproach surely have everything 
to fear from the outcome of the publicity 

insured by this institution. 
* + * 

CHILE CON CARNE 



By Autogenesis 
No Difference. — At dinner one day Dr. 
Whately, the Archbishop of Dublin, sat near 
a young aide-de-camp, and in the course of 
the meal the latter asked his grace : "Do 
you know the difference between an Arch- 
bishop and an ass?" The Archbishop was 
too taken aback to reply, and seeing his hesi- 
tation, the aide-de-camp continued : "One 
wears a cross on his mitre, the other wears 
it on his back." Dr. Whately looked the 
man over with the utmost gravity, and with- 
out relaxing a muscle of his face he pro- 
pounded another conundrum. "Do you 
know," he said, "the difference between an 
aide-de-camp and an ass?" "No, I do not," 
replied the officer, beginning to feel a little 
uncomfortable. "Neither do I, sir," thun- 
dered his grace, and the aide-de-camp col- 
lapsed. 



A Dead Elephant. — George Wombwell 
was a most enterprising showman, well 
known in the North of England. On one 
occasion he had decided not to take his men- 
aaerie to a certain fair in the north of En- 
gland, which he had always attended. His 
rival in the business heard of this, and made 
haste with his collection to the fair, thinking- 
he would have the place to himself. Womb- 
well instantly packed up and proceeded 
there. Unfortunately his elephant died 
during the night, and the showman was at 
his wits' end. His rival, too, took advan- 
tage of his predicament, and bodly adver- 
tised "that he would have the only live 
elephant in the fair." Wombwell at once 
set to work. He procured some dozens of 
yards of calico, on which he had printed in 
targe letters at frequent intervals, "The 
only dead elephant in Europe. Come in 
and see it." The calico he then attached 
right around his booth. So novel was the 
adertisement that it drew the whole fair to 
his show ; and Wombwell found that a dead 
elephant paid better than a living one. 

Dogberry, a Philosopher. — The Kaiser 
has a habit, bv no means popular with his 
officers, of making remarks of an outspoken 
and personal nature on the margins of the 
documents laid before him. The docu- 
ments in the Imperial archives arc accessi- 
ble to those whom they may concern. The 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



rtain prominent official was 
try summed up in the uncomplimentary 
-. "W hat an ass !" Sharing Dogberr) 's 
dislike to being termed an a>s. the man be- 
hl tliti intercession of his Majesty's 
private secretary, who. in turn, tactfully 
represented to the Emperor that, the re- 
mark being placed on record in the archives, 
the official would go down to posterity as 
an ass. "( >h. yes," replied the Kaiser, "I 
quite forgot that." An talcing a pen he 
substituted for the offending words: "\\ hal 
a philosopher!" 



Hymn or Anthem. — Two sailors met one 
day, and one of them asked the other, 
"Where have von been today, Bill?" "To 
church," was the reply. "What did you 
hear in church, Bill?" "Oh, anthems." 
"What i> an anthem?" was the next ques- 
tion. "Oh," replied Bill, "if I said 'Give 

me that spade.' that would be a hymn: but 
if I said: 'Give me that spade. Alleluia! 

Amen! Alleluia! Amen!' that would be an 
anthem." 



"Breeks." — The caddie of the old-fash- 
ioned sort was a firm believer in the equality 
of man on the golf links. He was not im- 
pertinent : he was merely outspoken. And 
his humor was native and unconscious and 
entirely innocent of all attempt at "smart- 
ness." A caddie who had contributed large- 
ly to the humor of the links was Sandy 
Smith, of North Berwick. What is perhaps 
the "classic" golf story centers round his 
name. The Lord Justice Clerk of Scotland. 
Lord Kings burg, while playing at North 
Berwick, attracted the attention of Sandy's 
employer who asked who that big, distin- 
guished-looking man was. "Div' ve no 
ken him?" cried Sandy. "That's Lord 
Kingsburg. Him and me's great frien's. 
Them's his breeks I've got on." More than 
likely this was the caddie, who, on being 
asked his name, replied: "Ma maiden 
name's Sandy, but they ca' me 'breeks.' " 



"Big Crawford." — The death of Henry 
Crawford, of North Berwick, better known 
as "Rig Crawford," robs the now very short 
roll of notable caddies of its most historic 
figure. There was little chance of losing 
Crawford in the crowd, for he stood over 
six feet. Tn his young days he had served 
in the Crimea, and laterly sold ginger-beer 
at the ninth hole at North Berwick. He had 
a most intimate knowledge of the game, and 
Ben Sayers, senior, whom he invariably ac- 
companied on all important matches, had 
the highest opinion of his judgment. He 
also carried regularly for Mr. A. J. Balfour 
at North Berwick. Crawford had a re- 
markable personality, and, while he had no 
lack of friends, he allowed nobody to pre- 
sume on his friendship. He was no re- 
specter of persons, and at a big- champion- 
ship meeting there was nobody like him at 
maintaining order. His voice, which was 



a- big ,i- In- b ly, could cover the course 
wth its stentorian shout. "Stan' hack there. 
wull ye!" But he had a kindly heart, 
and a generous one. More stories an 

about him than about perhaps anv olhei 
caddie. \\ hen old Willie Park was playing 

a match against old Tom Morris, Crawford 
caddied for the former. Describing the 

match he .-aid. "We won, rich! enough. 

Wullie was gey Faur through wi' it. but I 

had a bottle in ma pouch and ever) noo and 
than I wild gie him a bit sOOp. He wud spil 

it ott. but it ilid him a poo'er o' guid. An' 
we won by one up." 



Madame Aino Malmberg. — A very inter- 
esting personality is Madame Aino Malm- 
berg, the lady win. accompanies Dr. Hull in 
on her political mission to England. She 
has won distinction in her native country of 
no mean kind. She has made her name as 
a Dovelist, and has, besides having trans- 
lated Mr. Rudyard Kipling's works into 
Finnish, been engaged in teaching- at the 
High School for Women in Helsingfors. 
Madame Malmberg has also played an ac- 
tive part in the "women's freedom" crusade 
and in the year 1907 was sentenced to sev- 
eral days' imprisonment at St. Petersburg, 
where her political ideals are, of course, by 
no means welcome ones. She is a lady of 
distinctly portly but engaging presence, and 
has a bright, animated face that augurs well 
for a platform success. She is deeply in 
smypathy with the woman movement and 
its aims in England, and is there to give 
it her cordial moral support, though she 
cannot aspire to parliamentary honors. 
The Finnish Parliament is, by the way, said 
to work admirably, and will, no doubt, be 
regarded as a model when the suffragettes 
take their coveted seats in the Lower 
House ! 

+ + + 
Did Tailed Savages- Exist? 

With what kind of tails were our English 
ancestors provided? The fact that the at- 
tribution of tails to Englishmen was a com- 
mon international insult in the middle a°-es, 
somewhat like the epithet "frog eating" ap- 
nlied to Frenchmen in more modern times, 
has been a standing puzzle to historians. 
The Latin word candati — men with tails — 
was in such common use at one time as al- 
most to be a synonym of "Englishmen." 

In a description of the national character- 
istics of the various students at the Univer- 
sity of Paris Jacques de Vitry, a French 
writer of the thirteenth century, says that 
the French were noted for their haughty- 
bearing, the English as deep drinkers and as 
having tails. Some explain these passages 
as referring to the tails or heels of the Eng- 
lish shoes, which were very long; others as 
due to the wearing of the hair in queues, 
while still others think that a play upon 
words is intended, the word "coward" being 
connected with the Latin word for tail. To 
say that a medieval Englishman was "tailed" 



was, therefore, a polite way of charging him 

with o iwardice. 

\ w liter in the British Medical Journal, how- 
ever, has a newer explanation, which he be- 
lieves is th< correct one. In an early life of 

St. Augustine of ( 'antcrburv it is related that 
English fishermen ran after the Latin mis- 

sionaries and attached fishes' tails to their 

- as an insult. This story, the writer 

Says, was popular on the continent in the 
middle ages, and romancers added that 
heaven avenged the insult by causing the 
grandchildren of these fishermen to be born 
with tails. Hence the French characteriza- 
tion of Englishmen in general as "tailed." 

Whichever explanation may be right, 
there is no doubt that the epithet was fixed 
in the popular mind by the current belief 
that certain savage races of tailed men ex- 
isted in various remote parts of the world. 

Stenography's Patron Saint 

"One of the greatest of modern benefac- 
tors to commercial life." So the late Sir 
Isaac Pitman was once described, and the 
eulogy was well deserved. Shorthand to- 
day stands as one of the most valuable as- 
sets of business life, and there are hundreds 
of thousands of young men and women 
throughout the world who, at the present 
time, owe their position and prosperity in 
life to the man who* invented phonography, 
and thus opened up for them a vast field of 
employment. 

To them the story of "The Life of Sir 
Isaac Pitman," told by Alfred Baker, and 
published by the firm which Sir Isaac 
founded years ago at Amen Corner, should 
prove of special interest and value. It tells 
an absorbing story of the invention of short- 
hand, and how for nearly twenty years Sir 
Isaac worked at his famous system, by night 
as well as by day. During these years he 
labored from six in the morning until ten at 
night, spending all his profit except a bare 
living wage in making phonography one of 
the most perfect systems of shorthand ever 
invented. 

Isaac Pitman was always a strenuous 
worker. When he started life, at a very 
early age, as a clerk in a cloth factory, he 
found time for systematic study, although 
the hours were from six in the morning un- 
til six at night. He and his brother Tacob 
rose at four each morning, and devoted 
nearly two hours to their books. They then 
left home to begin the duties of the dav, 
and in the evening gave one or two more 
hours to study. 

When he was twelve years of age Pitman 
commenced a system of memory training, 
and in his morning walks committed to 
memory the first fourteen chapters of Pro- 
verbs. He would not undertake a fresh 
chapter until he had repeated the preceding 
one without hesitation. Then at sixteen he 
carefully read through Walker's Dictionary, 
with the double object of extending- his 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



knowledge of words and of correcting' his 
errors in orthoepy. 

Here is another example of his amazing- 
working- powers. When he was twenty- 
two years of age, Pitman came across Bag- 
ster's Comprehensive Bible and discovered 
some fifteen inaccuracies in the references. 
Forthwith he wrote to that publisher: 

"I have made it my custom for two or 
three years in my morning- and evening' read- 
ing of Scripture to refer to every parallel 
place, in some measure appreciating- the 
value of the lilan. If you would like to place 
a copy of your Bible under my care I would 
give you the benefit of the corrections and 
mistakes which I might discover." 

.There were 500,000 references in this 
Bible, and the self-imposed task occupied 
him three years. But though he refused any 
monetary reward, he had the satisfaction of 
finding' an error on every page and a friend- 
ly publisher who helped him later when he 
wanted to publish his shorthand books. 

' It was about this time that young Pitman 
■tried to win a thousand-dollar prize which 
-was' offered by the Government, at the time 
when penny postag-e became possible, for a 
suggestion for the best method of collecting 
the pence for prepaid letters. He "sub- 
mitted to the Lords of the Treasury a pro- 
posal for penny postage stamps, printed 
from engraved plates- in sheets containing 
240, which could be used for affixing to let- 
ters, and as remittance for small amounts, 
and further recommended — and this was the 
unlucky stroke of economy that proved his 
undoing — that the stamps should be used 
for sealing the letter or envelope. The in- 
convenience of cancelling the stamp, when 
affixed at the back of the letter, gave the 
much-coveted prize to another competitor, 
who repeated Pitman's idea, but with the 
suggestion that the stamps be affixed on the 
face of- the letter, at the upper right-hand 
corner, as is the convenient practice today. 
"Probably few men of his generation so 
consistently lived the simple life as Isaac 
Pitman," writes Air. Baker. "His dietary 
was limited to three moderate meals per day 
from the fruits of the earth ; of alcoholic 
liquors he never partook, and until late in 
life it was not his custom even to drink tea ; 
he did not smoke, and had a profound an- 
tipathy to the use of tobacco by others. At 
the public luncheons and banquets which 
he attended he never departed from his 
simple vegetarian dietary— -a fact over which 
the gourmands were apt to chortle. 

"When the Lord Mayor of London enter- 
tained the International Shorthand Congress 
to luncheon at the Mansion House, Isaac 
Pitman's vegetarianism — he partook of a 
potato and a glass of water — attracted the 
attention of his lordship's chaplain, who 
wrote an impromptu Latin epigram," which, 
translated, read as follows: 

"He 'refuses wine, and eats only vege- 
tables; many angles are to be found in his 



mind, but when he writes the words flow 
and every angle disappears." 

* * * 

Are Men Gro-wing Smaller? 

A French statistician who has been study- 
ing the military and other records with a. 
view of determining- the heig'ht of men at 
different periods has reached some wonder- 
ful results. 

He has not only solved some perplexing 
problems in regard to the past of the human 
race, but is also enabled to calculate its fu- 
ture and to determine the exact period when 
man will disappear from the earth. 

The recorded facts extend over nearly 
three centuries. 

It is found that in 1610 the average height 
of man in Europe was 1.75 metres, or say 
5 ft. 9 in. In 1790 it was 5 ft. 6 in. In 1820 
it was 5 ft. 5 in. and a fraction. At the pres- 
ent time it is 5 ft. 3^4 hi. It is easy to de- 
duce from these figures a rate of regular and 
gradual decline in human stature, and then 
apply this, working backward and forward, 
to the past and to the future. By this cal- 
culation it is determined that the stature oi 
the first men attained the surprising aver- 
age of 16 ft. 9 in. 

Truly there were giants on the earth in 
those days. The race had alredy deterior- 
ated in the days of Og, and Goliath was a 
quite degenerate offspring of the giants. 
Coming down to later time, we find that at 
the beginning of our era the average height 
of man was 9 ft., and in the time of Charle- 
magne it was 8 ft. 8 in. But the most aston- 
ishing result of this scientific study comes 
from the application of the same inexorable 
law of diminution to the future. The cal- 
culation shows that by the year 4000 A. D. 
the stature of the average man will be re- 
duced to 15 in. At that epoch there will be 
only Lilliputians on the earth. And the con- 
clusion of the learned statistician is irresis- 
tible : that "the end of the world will cer- 
tainly arrive, for the inhabitants will have 
become so small that they will finally dis- 
appear" — "finish by disappearing," as the 
French idiom expresses it — "from the ter- 
restrial globe." 

$ <£• ■£ 

"&/>e Biggest Barometer 

A huge oil barometer has been constructed 
in the city of Faenza, Italy, as a monument 
to its distinguished citizen, Torricelli, the 
inventor of the barometer, the tercentenary 
of whose birth is celebrated this year. The 
liquid column in suoh a barometer stands 
normally at about 37 feet, and its fluctuations 
are read in feet, while those of the ordinary 
mercury barometer are in inches. This is 
due, of course, to the fact that as oil is much 
lighter than mercury it requires a much 
higher column to balance the pressure of 
the atmosphere. 

It was at first intended to use water as the 
liquid, in which case the column would have 
stood normally at about 32 feet; but this 



plan was abandoned, owing to the ease of 
evaporation. Glycerine was next tried, but 
the normal height of the column was only 
27 feet, and it was desirable to have it much 
higher. Olive oil was finally chosen, and is 
quite satisfactory. 

The tube, which is of iron, except at the 
top, where the height of the column must be 
observed, is supported by a monumental pil- 
lar of stone. This is doubtless the largest 
barometer that ever has been constructed, 
although it had some famous rivals even 
during the lifetime of Torricelli. 

Pascal, a French philosopher, made baro- 
meters of different liquids, including one of 
mixed wine and water, in Paris. Zophar 
Mills of New York set up a glycerine baro- 
meter in his house in 1887, and several water 
barometers have been built, of which the 
most notable was probably that set up in the 
tower of St. Jacques, an Paris, by M. 
Jaubert in 1890. 

The olive oil barometer of Faenza will 
continue to hold the record of size until some 
one succeeds in using a still lighter fluid, in 
which case the height of the barometric col- 
umn will, of course, be greater. 

$ $ £■ 

-A.n Eleven-foot Beard 

Valentine Tapley, of Frankford, Mo., has 
perhaps the. longest beard on record, 11 ft. 
in length. Mr. Tapley stands 6 ft., and his 
beard is long enough to reach his entire 
length and lie 5 ft. 7 in. on the floor. He 
has not trimmed his beard since the Civil 
War. 

Mr. Tapley lives on a farm near Frank- 






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PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



■.Mi as the "Kingdom of 
urnl countr) 
says he hasn't done anything since the 
the war l>ut pay taxes and vote 

Mr. Tapley ma) be called eccentric. He 
very little i<>r money and display, pre- 
ferring his quiel farm life to that of i li « 
of the curious. He has refused large offers 
with show- and t< «ur America and for- 
eign count • 

He wears hi- beard rolled up and under 
his shirt bosom, wrapped in a fine -iik cloth 
* + + 

Hasthe Solar System bhrunh? 

Prof. T. J. J. Sic director of the naval ob- 
servatory at Marc Island, advances the fol 
lowing theory of the formation of the solar 

-v -tern : 

He denies that the planets were ever de- 
tached from tlu- sun when that globe w is 

expanded into a nebula tilling the planet u\ 
orbits and submits mathematical calcula- 
tions to show that all these masses have 
captured. ( Iriginally the system was 
a spiral nebula of much larger dimensions 
than at present, formed by the automatic 
coiling up under mutual gravitation of two 
or more streams of cosmical dust, which met 
in such a way as to produce a whirling mo- 
tion about a center or vortex. As the neb- 
ula coiled up under its own mutual gravi- 
tation the spirals were gradually drawn 
nearer together, and all the nuclei formed 
in these coils revoked in eliptical paths of 
large eccentricit) . 

These original nuclei in the coilinfj 
streams were the beginning of the planets, 
which became larger by gathering up more 
cosmical dust, while at the same time their 
orbits were reduced in size and rounded up 
under the secular action of the resisting 



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medium again--, which these bodies re- 
voked. I'hc resisting medium is the true 
secret of the roundness of the orbits of the 
planet- and satelliti 

I'hc early perfect circularitv of the-. 
bits has always excited the wonder of the 

greatest mathematicians. This nebulous 
resistance has greatly diminished tin 

and eccentricit) of the original orbit-, -o 
that our solar -• -tern was in the hcginuiii" 
much larger than it is known to In- today. 
"If Neptune were the outermost planet." he 
said, "the orbit would not be SO round, for 
this circularity of the orbit indicates that 
Neptune revoked For a long time against 
great resistance, and therefore the nebula at 
that distance was dense enough to havi 
forded matter for several other planet- be- 
yond." 

+ * + 
Abnormal Twilight 

Twilight, which is normally <\uq to the re- 
fraction of the sun's light by the atmo- 
sphere, is occasionally modified by other 
natural causes. Rosy glows in the west af- 
ter sunset are reported to be particularly 



common in the vicinity of Bordeaux, France. 

I'l'.e-e are not the usual sunset glows 
appear in the sky -).- degree- above tin 
and ,ot supposed to l.e dm- to reflection 
high clouds too thin to be seen in ordinary 
light. The same invisible cloud- ni.iv also 

cause abnormal prolongation of twilight, as 

on the firs! dav of last Jul) in tin- sam, ri 
gion, where a watch could b( ad up 

to four minutes to 10 p. m., whereas on the 

following night it could be read onl) till a 

quarter past 9, a difference of 41 minutes. 

Owing io the presence of the thin clouds 
above described, these long twilights are of 
use to astronomers as an indication that the 
night will not be favorable for astronomic il 
i bservatii in. 



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PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



HIT OR MISS 

Since the great success of the com- 
bined efforts of the L. A. Symphony 
and the Woman's Orchestra at the 
Examiner benefit there has been a 
general call for a joint concert by 
these organizations in the near future. 
It is a good idea. The March Cos- 
mopolitan has an article called "The 
Grand Orchestra in America," by 
Charles Edward Russell. After speak- 
ing of the symphony orchestras in 
America he reverts to Los Angeles 
and says: '"Los Angeles is distin- 
guished among these cities because it 
not only maintains a regular sym- 
phony orchestra of men players, but 
an excellent symphony orchestra com- 
posed entirely of women, with fifty- 
five members, which has given sea- 
sons of concerts every year since 1892. 
All the orchestral instruments are 
represented, including oboes, horns, 
and tympani, and at each concert a 
symphony is performed. The conduc- 
tor is Mr. Harley Hamilton, the or- 
ganizer of this unique enterprise. I 
have never heard it play, but very 
complimentary things are said of its 
work, and of the art-zeal and de- 
votion of its members. They played 
Grieg Concerto twice in one season 
— once with Adela Verne, and once 
with Teresa Carreno. Probably no 
better testimony of their proficiency 
is needed, but I may mention that 
after the performance Carreno, who 
is an exacting artist, gave them fer- 
vent praise. The concert master is 
Miss Edna Foy, who seems to toe a 
musician of very unusual capacity." 



lime. S. Tedeschi, an Italian woman 
of brilliant attainments, has been vis- 
iting Los Angeles recently. She feels 
great interest in her countrymen, who 
have established themselvs in the new 
world. In speaking of the impression 
which has gone abroad that most Ital- 
ians return eventually to Italy, Mime. 
Tedeschi claims that this applies only 
to Italians who try to live on the 
Atlantic seaboard. When Italians 
come to the Pacific coast they come 
to stay, as they do not suffer here 
from tuberculosis, as many of them do 
in the more rigorous climate of the 
east. The Italians improve in material 
conditions after being in the United 
States for several years but they lose 
something of the art of happy living. 
Social instincts in this country do not 
seem to be as stirring as in the older 
lands. Having more comforts we are 
perhaps less dependent on each other 
for social interests. Mme. Tedeschi 
is on her way to join her husband in 
Buenos Ayres. 



interpretation, realizing to the full its 
possibilities. Indeed, she is said to 
have far outplayed the composer him- 
self when he played the same work 
in this country not so very long ago. 
All of which is very wonderful for a 
girl of her years. 



A new pianist has just arrived in' 
New York! This time a young girl, 
only seventeen years old, Germaine 
Arnaud, by name. She has just come 
from the French capitol and has 
played two concerts with the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra and has been re- 
engaged for a third. Her playing of 
the Saint-Saens Concerto was declar- 
ed to be a truly artistic performance. 
Not only did she conquer easily .the 
almost insuperable difficulties of this 
concerto but she also gave a splendid 



At the last meeting of the commit- 
tee called by the Chamber of Com- 
merce to discuss the holding of a 
spring music festival, it was the con- 
census of opinion that it was now too 
late to do anything for this spring, 
since all the clubs have their work 
planned out for the rest of the year. 
Has anyone any suggestions? 

The Nowland-Hunter Trio concert 
on Monday night will toe in a decided- 
ly minor key, their program contain 1 
ing the A minor trio of Cecile Chami- 
nade, the D minor sonata of Niels 
Gade and the IC minor trio of Arthur 
Foote. 



It is rumored that Mr. Hugh Gib- 
son, who left Los Angeles not long 
ago to serve in the diplomatic corps 
in 'Honduras, will shortly be trans- 
ferred to Persia. Mr. Borg accompa- 
nied Mr. Gibson to Central America 
and letters from him describe the con- 
ditions in the country as being often 
rather trying. 



Prof. Ed. B. 'Clapp, of Berkeley, 
is coming south on February 23 to 
lecture in "behalf of the Southwest 
Museum in their rooms in the Ham- 
burger Building. He will speak on 
"New Light on Greek Painting." Prol. 
Clapp is one of the highest authori- 
ties in the United States upon the 
Greek language, literature and art. 
Just now when Greek dacing is the 
talk of the hour, a word upon Greek- 
may not be amiss. 



Mr. ICotourn is a new recruit to the 
Painter's Club. He paints street 
scenes, one of which he displayed at 
the monthly meeting of the club 
last Tuesday. Mr. W. Wendt, who 
has been exhibiting some of his pic- 
tures in Chicago, is expected home in 
the course of a few days. He sold 
four of his pictures in Chicago. 



Mrs. J. A. Jahn has recently begun 
portraits in pastel of the child of Mrs. 
Welcome and the son of Mrs. J. E. 
Fishburn. Later she expects to be- 
gin oils of both Mr. and Mrs. Fish- 
burn. 



Mr. Jean Mannheim, whose paint- 
ings have aroused so much interest 
during the last ten days, will be pres- 
ent at Mrs. John W. Mitchell's on 
Sunday at her usual informal recep- 
tion. 



Mme. Langdorf will give an extra 
concert this (Saturday) afternoon at 
Simpson Auditorium. 



Mr. J. E. MicBurney will give an 
exhibition of his pictures in Steckels' 
gallery, beginning February 15. 



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PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



::: REMINISCENCES OF LINCOLN::: 



WITH 
Lincoln centci 

iriny 
I lioni h.iv. 
duced ■ arc worth] 

these 

peculiarly interesting. Thi ■ 

"1 incoln and t linel", 

> hittenden, and a nc« 

ol "Reminiscences "i Abraham 

in by Distinguished Men of Hi- 

Time", collected and edited by the 

Vllen Thorndike Rice, a former 

le North American Review. 

Mr. Chittenden was register of the 

treasury from 1861 to 1865 and a per- 

friend of Lincoln. He therefore 

one having authority, and 

with justice, for he bore an important 

share in the episode lie relates. 

It was on a dark September morn- 
ing in 1861, he informs us, that he 
»a- waited on at his Washington ol 
..rty of soldiers. They be- 
d to the Third Vermont 
num. then stationed at the Chain 
Bridge. some three mil.- above 
getown. One of their number, 
a youth of twenty-one. had fallen 
asleep at his pOSI a- sentinel. A 
hardy boy. not as yet inured to mili- 
tary life, he had found it impossible 
to keep awake for two nigh-ts in suc- 
n. He had been found by the 
relief sound asieep. had been eon 
1 by a court martial and sen- 
tenced to be shot. 

With tears in their eyes, his com- 
plcaded with Mr. Chittenden to 
n-c his influence and save the boy's 
life. 

lie'- as good a boy as there is in 
the army," said their leader, "and lie 
is not to blame." Scott had never 
before been up all night in his life, 
lie had been "all beat out" by his first 
experience. The second night he had 
succumbed to sheer physical exhaus- 
tion. 

Mr. Chittenden's heart was touched. 
He determined to put young Scott in 
personal touch with President Lin- 
coln By using all his influence he 
succeeded. 

This is how Scott himself told the 
-lory of the interview: 

"The President was the kindest 
man 1 had ever seen. 1 knew him at 
once by a Lincoln medal I had long 
worn, I was scared at first, for 1 had 
never before talked with a great man, 
lint Mr. Lincoln was so easy with 
me. so gentle, that I soon forgot my 
fright. lie asked me all about the 
people at home, the neighbors, the 
farm and where I went to school, and 
who my schoolmates were. Then he 
asked me about mother, and 'how she 
looked, and I was glad I could take 
her photograph from my bosom and 
shmv it to him. He said how thank- 
ful I ought to be that my mother still 
lived, and ihow, if he was in my place, 



he would try to make her a proud 
mother and never cause her a sorrow 
or a tear 1 cannot remember it all. 
but every Word was so kind. 

"He had -aid nothing that 

dreadful next morning. I thought it 
must be that he »;i. 90 kind hi 
that he didn't like to .-peak of it. Hut 
why did be saj so much about my 
mother, and ray not causing- her a 
sorrow or a tear, when I knew 

1 must die the next morning? Bui i 
supposed that wa- something that 
would have 

1 determined to brace up and tell him 
that I did not feel a bit guilty, and 
ask him wouldn't he fix it so that the 
firing party would not he from our 
regiment! That was going to be the 
-1 of all — to die by the hands of 
my comrades, 

"Just as 1 was going to ask him 
this favor he stood up, and he says to 
me: 'My boy, stand up here and look 
me in the face.' 1 did as he bade me. 
'My boy,' he said, 'you are not going 
to be shot tomorrow. I believe you 
when you tell me that you could not 
keep awake. 1 am going to trust you 
and send you back to your regiment. 
But 1 have 'been put to a great deal 
of trouble on your account. I have 
had to come up here from Washing- 
ton, when I have got a great deal to 
do, and wdiat 1 want to know is, How 
are you going to pay my bill?' 

"There was a big lump in my 
throat. I could scarcely speak. 1 
had expected to die, you see, and had 
kind of got used to thinking that way. 
To have it all changed in a minute' 
But I got it crowded down and man- 
aged to say: 

"'1 am grateful, Mr. Lincoln. I 
hope I am as grateful as ever a man 
can be to you for saving my life. But 
it comes upon me sudden and unex- 
pected like. I didn't lay out for it at 
all. But there is some way for me 
to pay you, and I will find it out af- 
ter a little. There is the bounty in 
the savings bank. I guess we could 
borrow some money on the mortgage 
of the farm. There was my pay, 
which was something, and if he would 
wait until pay day I was sure the 
boys would help, so I thought we 
could make it up if it wasn't more 
than five or six hundred dollars.' 
'But it is a great deal more than that,' 
he said. Then I said I didn't just see 
how, but I was sure I would find some 
way — if I lived. 

"Then Mr. Lincoln put his hands on 
my shoulders and looked into my 
face a- if he was sorry, and said: 'My 
boy. my bill is a very large one. Your 
friends cannot pay it, nor your boun- 
ty, nor the farm, nor all your com- 
rades! There is only one man in all 
the world who can pay it, and his 
name is William Scott! If from this 
day William Scott does his duty, so 
lli:il. if I was there when he comes to 



die. he can look me in the face as he 
now, aiid say, I have kept my 
promise, and 1 have done my duty as 
a soldier, then my debt will be paid. 
Will you make that promise and try 
ii . " 

and did keep ln- 
promi si trned the reputa- 

tion of being the bravest man in his 
regiment, the faithfullest and the kind- 
est. I i anj mar ■■■■ ere nei ded for the 
most exposed service, Scott was al- 
ways eager to be called upon. If any 
Other man were in trouble, Scott was 
his good Samaritan. If any soldier 
were sick, Scott was his willing nurse, 
lie was ready to volunteer for any- 
extra service or labor. Nevertheless 
he steadily refused promotion, saying 
that he had done nothing to deserve 
it. 

The end came in March, 1862, near 
Vorktown. The federal forces were 
on one side of the James River, the 
Confederate on the other. General Mc- 
Clcllan had ordered General Smith to 
assault and capture the works on the 
south bank. The (Confederates, how- 
ever, were too. strongly intrenched. 
They drove their assailants back 
across the river. Scott was almost 
the first to reach the south bank, the 
first in the rifle pits and the last to 
retreat. He was carrying one of his 
wounded comrades across the stream 
when the fire of the enemy was con- 
centrated upon him. He staggered 
with his living burden to the shore 
and fell. 

"He was shot all to pieces," said an 
eye witness. "We carried him back 
out of the line of fire and laid him on 
the grass to die. But his strength was 
great, and such a powerful man was 
hard to kill." They carried him to a 
cot in « nearby tent. Just at daylight 
the word was passed that Scott 
wanted to see all the boys. They went 
into his tent and stood around his cot. 
His face was bright and his voice 
cheerful. 

" 'Boys,' he said, T will never see 
another battle. I supposed this would 
be my last. I haven't nutoh to say. 
You all know wdiat you can tell them 
at home about me. I have tried to 
do the right thing. 1 am almost cer- 
tain you will all say that.' Then, while 
his strength was failing, his life ebb- 
ing away, and we looked to see his 
voice sink into a whisper, his face 
lighted up and his voice came out 
natural and clear as he said: 'If any 
of you ever have the chance I wish 
you would tell President Lincoln that 
I have never forgotten the kind words 
he said to me at the Chain Bridge; 
that I have tried to be a good soldier 
and true to the flag; that I should 
'have paid my whole debt to him if I 
had lived, and that now, when I know 
that I am dying, I think of his kind 
face and thank him again, because he 
gave me the chance to fall like a sol- 



i- battli .ui.i ii. .i like a coward 

by the hands of my comrade.-.'" 

Then he closed Ins eyes, crossed his 

hands on his breast, and that was all. 

i I new edition of Reminiscences 

i in. recollection ... lawyei 

i he circuit with Lincoln in llli- 

""i and heard Fr In- lip- the story 

..i his life and listened to his tales 
1.. lore I'm fit n aj side taverns, 

descriptions of his early political cam- 
paigns by men who listened to his 
.speech.,- .Hid vivid pictures of his per- 
sonality sketched by friends, members 
of his administration, high officers ot 
the Union army and others who were 
brought into close contact with Lin- 
coln the man and saw him in every 
aspect of his many-sided character. 

"He was melancholy without be- 
ing morbid," says Mr. Rice, "a lead- 
ing characteristic of men of genuine 
humor, and it was this sense of humor 
that often enabled him to endure the 
most cruel strokes, that called for his 
sense of pity and cast a gloom over 
his official life. On these occasions 
he would relieve himself by compar- 
ing trifles with great things and great 
things with trifles. No story was too 
trivial or even too coarse for his pur- 
pose provided that it aptly illustrated 
his ideas or served Ills policy." 

To this peculiar tendency of mind 
we undoubtedly owe the many stories 
and quaint sayings wihich lend a 
strange and uncommon interest to 
every recollection of Lincoln. 

As an illustration of the peculiar ra- 
pidity with which he would pass from 
one side of his nature to the other 
Mr. Rice cites a story for which ihe is 
indebted to Governor Curtin, of 
Pennsylvania. 

Summoned from the gory battle- 
field of, Fredericksburg to the White 
House, Lincoln plied him with ques- 
tion after question. 

"Mr. President," said the Governor, 
"it was not a battle; it was a 
butchery," 

As Curtin described one harrowing 
scene after another Lincoln reached 
a state of nervous excitement that 
bordered upon insanity. 

Finally, as the Governor was pre- 
paring to leave, he grasped the Presi- 
dent's hand and said: "Mr. President, 
I am deeply touched by your sorrow 
and at the distress I have caused you. 
I have only answered your questions. 
No doubt my impressions have been 
colored by the sufferings I have seen. 
I trust matters will look brighter 
when the official reports come in. I 
would give all I possess to know 
how to rescue you from this terrible 
war." 

Lincoln's whole aspect suddenly 
changed and he relieved his mind by- 
telling a story. 

"This reminds me, Governor," he 
"of an old farmer out in Illi- 
nois that I used to know. He took it 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



into his head to go into hog raising. 
He sent out to Europe and imported 
the finest breed of hogs he could buy. 
The rjrize hog was put in a pen, and 
the farmer's two mischievous boys, 
James and John, were told to be sure 
not to let him out. But James, the 
worst of the two, let the brute out 
next day. The hog went straight for 
the boys and drove John up a tree. 
Then the hog went for the seat of 
James's trousers, and the only way 
the boy could save himself was by 
holding on to the hog's tail. The 
hog would not give up his hunt nor 
the boy his hold! After they had 
made a good many circles around the 
tree the boy's courage began to 
give out, and he shouted to his 
brother, T say, John, come down, 
quick, and help m,e let this hog go!' 
Now, Governor, that is exactly my 
case. I wish some one would come 
and help me let this hog go!" 
* * * 
FORTHCOMING EVENTS 



(Feb. 6 to Feb. 13) 
Theatres Next Week 

Auditorium — "Little Red Riding 
Hood". 

Belasco — "A Stranger in New 
York". 

Burbank — "Faust". 

Grand — "The Girl from Paris". 

Majestic — "Babes in Toyland". 

'Mason— "The Red Mill". 
Exhibitions 

Blanchard Hall — Jean Mannheim, 
Paintings. 

Meetings and Lectures 

Today (Saturday, Feb. 6) — 6:46 a.' 
m. Sunrise. 

11:15 p. m. City Club. 

2:30 p. m. "Duty of College Wom- 
en", Mrs. M. W. Park, Gamut Audi- 
torium. 

3 p. m. Frieda Langendorff Recital, 
Simpson Auditorium. 

7:30 p. m. Playground No. 1, Violet 
street, "Care of Body", Prof. Terman. 

7:30 p. m. Playground No. 2, Echo 
Park, "Fossil Life on Pacific Coast". 
Prof. J. Z. Gilbert. 

8 p. m. Playground No. 3, St. John 
street, Musical, Vernon orchestra, 
Rev. W. A. Brown, director. 

8 p. m. Russian concert, Bethlehem 
Institution, Vignes street. 

8 p. m. "Twelfth Night", Occiden- 
tal College students. 

Sunday, Feb. 7.-2:30 p. m. "Catho- 
licism and Modernism", Ed. Adams 
ICantrell, Mammoth Hall. 

3 p. m. "Brains", Dr. H. S. Bradlej', 
Temple Auditorium. 

3 p. m. Opera Recital, "The Nibe- 
lung", B. G. Kingsley, Blanchard Hall. 

8 p. m. "Evolutions of Ideas of 
God", Chas. T. Sprading, Liberal 
Club, Mammoth Hall. 

8:15 p. m. "London", Prof. Baum- 
gardt, .Symphony Hall. 

Monday, Feb. 8. — 9 a. m. Board of 
Public Works. 

9:30 a. m. Board of Supervisors. 

10 'a. m. Finance Committee. 

10:30 a. m. "Montaigne and Bran- 
tome", Prof. H. Alliot. Ruskin Art 
Rooms. 

10:45 a. m. "Wireless Telegraphy",' 
Prof. Twining, Normal School. 



2:30 p. m. "Spain", Prof. B. F. 
Baumgardt, Ebell Club. 

3:30 p. m. Water Commission, 440 
S. Hill street. 

6 p. m. Architectural Club Dinner. 

7:30 p. m. Board of Education, Se- 
curity Bldg. 

7:30 p. m. Colegrove Board -of 
Trade, Cole's Hall. 

8 p. m. "Solar Cyclones and Mag- 
netic Fields", Dr. Geo. E. Hale, 
Throop Institute, Pasadena. 

8 p. m. Lecture, 'Dr. H. S. Bradley, 
Y. M. C. A. 

8 p. m. "Shakespeare's Wand and 
Sceptre," Dr. H. B. Sprague, Y. W. C. 
A., Hill street. 

8 p. m. Reading, Mrs. M. M. Grigg, 
Y. W. C. A. 

8:15 p. m. Nowland-Hunter Trio, 
Symphony Hall. 

S p. m. "Tom Moore", a play by 
graduating class, Polytechnic High 
School. 

Tuesday, Feb. 9.-9:30 Board of 
Supervisors. 

10 a. m. Highland Park Ebell Club, 
Travel Talks, Mrs. Housh and Dr. 
Ruth Wood, Masonic Hall. 

12 m. Woman's Press Club lunch- 
eon, Y. W. C. A. 

1:30 p. m. City Council, Los An- 
geles. 

2 p. m. Lyric Club rehearsal, Sym- 
phony Hall. 

2:30 p. m. Police Commission. 

3 p. m. Woman's Orchestra re- 
hearsal, Blanchard Hall 

4:30 p. m. Civil Service Commis- 
sion. 

8 p. m. Orpheus Club rehearsal, 
Gamut Club. 

8 p. m. "Tom Moore", play by stu- 
dents, Polytechnic High School. 

Wednesday, Feb. 10. — 10 a. m. "Ren- 
aissance Furniture", Mrs. Bradley and 
Mrs. Gibbs, Ruskin Art Club. 

10:30 a. m. "American Music", Mrs. 
Welsh, Eibell Club. 

10:30 a. m. Park Commission. 

2 p. m. and 8 p m. "Strongheart", 
a play by senior class, L. A. High 
School. 

3 p. m. Board of Directors, Cham- 
ber of Commerce. 

3 p. m. Woman's Club, Holly- 
wood. 

7 p. m. Board of Trustees, Holly- 
wood. 

8 p. m. Class exercises. Polytechnic 
High School. 

Thursday, Feb. 11. — Bond Election, 
Pasadena. 

10:30 a. m. Fire Commission. 

2 p. m. Lincoln Centenary, pre- 
sentation of bronze tablet and address 
by R. J. Burdette, Normal School. 

8 p. m. Commencement exercises. 
Polytechnic High School. 

8:15 p. m. Lott-Krauss concert, 
Simpson Auditorium. 

Friday, Feb. 12.— Lincoln's Birth- 
day. 

10 a. m. Supply Committee. 

10:30 a. m. "Abraham Lincoln," Mrs. 
McCan, Mrs. Noel and Mrs. Foster, 
Friday Morning Club. 

2 p m. Board of Public Works. 

3 p. m. "Imperial Sculpttire of 
Rome", Prof. H. Alliot, University of 
Southern California. 



4:30 p. m. Housing Commission. 

8 p. m. Address to City Teachers, 
Dr. E. C. Moore, Polytechnic High 
School. 

Saturday, Feb. 13.-12:15 p. m. City 
Club. 

5:35 p. m. Sunset. 



Father: "It's singular that whenever 
I want you to marry a man you ob- 
ject, and whenever I do not want you 
to marry one you straightway insist 
on it." 

Daughter: "Yes; and whenever we 
are agreed the man objects." 




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PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



AMUSEMENTS 



"The Spoil, rs" 

nsivc 
nee than t li.it which fill- the Bnr- 

.in. 1 I \riluir — a melodrama, 

in truth, with the usual situation! 
character", in ... There 

ther, played b) 
Mr Mcstayer in a sombrero and cor- 
ilh a diamond glittering in 
;, id red til re the 

Documents without which no 
isibly could be con 
led The laid in f:ir 

Maska rlic "Land of Purpli 1 >r- 
-." wlu-rc no questions are asked 



inn. .cent 

attired, when -he blew in from Da« 
she had just stepped out ol 
.i band-box. Miss Hall played Helen 
ster, in search of her long li isl 
brother, in an incredibly -mart shrimp 
pink princess which must have 
a sensation up there in the cold coun- 
try. The scene in the dance hall in 
Act III. when hell was a popping, 
was made noisily realistic by rag-time 
music, pistol-shots and a lively mob. 
Lovers of melodrama mii-i liavi 

! t<. hear such ..1.1 familiar lines 
as these: "Marry you? No — a I 
anil time-, no!" ami "So— you defy 
me, eh!" Byron Beaslej was the 




m • 








Ai.an and Jans in "Babes in Toyland" atthe Majestic 



"There's never a law of God or man 
run- ii. irth >>f 53." 

John Burton's quaint, loquacious old 
Joe Dextry is a delightful character- 
ization. He tells inimitably, between 
puffs at his pipe, thai story about a 
steady and exclusive three years 1 diet 
of pork and beans. David Edwin in 
a tan-colored wig and a drooping mus- 
tache, does a good piece ol' work as 
tlie district attorney of Nome. Henry 
Stockbridge, as Slap Jack Simms, who 
considers lynching the king of out- 
door sports, had a make-up which con- 
vulsed the house every time he came 
on tlie stage Lovell Taylor as Cher- 
ry, an out-and-out bad one, with a 



most villainous villain of the piece, 
and his fight with the hero. Desmond, 
in the last act made people rise in 
their scats and hold their breath. 
'I here's no doubt aibout it; the au- 
dience liked "The Spoilers" immense- 
ly. 

Florence Roberts at the Majestic 
The "House of Bondage," Seymour 

Obermer's absorbing and painful play, 
in which Florence Roberts is starring 
under John Tort's management, at 
the Majestic this week, is based upon 
i lie injustice of English divorce laws, 
which provide that a man may obi. .in 
a divorce from his wife for infidelity 



a divorce, must prove not only inn- 
hut physical crueltj as well. 
The plot i- a deftly tangled skein, the 

people live ill a rotten world and talk 

illy, cleverly and flippantly about 

thing- once held sacred The play 

li ips a quid ion of in- 

tensely dramatic movi 

steadily and coherently to a climax 

Arthur Forresl give- an moll 
and convincing presentation of the 
faithless husband, win. smilinglj ad 
mil- that he i- "a devilish had lot," 
unwilling or unable to live up to the 



ideal- of In- "infernally 
hut genuinely in love with another 
ii who understands him and 
whom he can understand. ThurloM 

in such 
an unctuous and elocutionary style 
thai our constantl emii d one 

-elf thai Bertrand i- not a provin 
cial preacher, bul a celebrated London 
eon. Mi- Hi i er failure t< i realize 
ih, author's intei i i< m, seriously mars 
the entire production. Ann Waning 
ion makes the guilty love of the 
Di liess of Banff seem almost admir- 
able by the fervor and naturalness of 



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charge of Captain Robert A. 
Gibbs. 

The school has athletic field 
where boys are taught sports 
and military drill. 

William Himrod, graduate of 
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mile runner of Pacific coast, is 
in charge of boys' play and 
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Home Phone 21202 
Sanset South 3539 



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buildings are well adapted to a 
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upper balconies and beautiful 
grounds, set out to semi-tropical 
shrubbery. Miss Emma E. Page 
and Miss Delia M. Page, prin- 
cipals of these schools, are from 
Hiram College, Ohio, and both 
are Normal graduates. Miss 
Clara J. Armstrong, principal of 
the high school department, is 
a graduate of Oswego State 
Normal School. New York, a 
teacher whose exceptional abil- 
ity and experience along general 
educational lines is well known 
and established. 

Girls here are taught vocal 
and instrumental music, drawing 
and painting, .physical culture, 
elocution; these in addition to 
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10 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



her acting. Miss Roberts has the role 
of the unhappy wife, whose married 
life has been one long humiliation, anct 
who is unable legally to release her- 
self from her unfaithful husband — 
since he has not beaten her as yet! 
According to English law, it seems, 
if a man beats his wife that is cruelty; 
but infidelity is merely human nature. 
Miss Roberts plays the part well — 
with subtlety and reserve. Her re- 
semblance to Mrs. Fiske is more 
marked than ever. But Miss Roberts 
is unable to hold the sympathy of the 
audience because she puts too much 
mentality and too little heart into her 
interpretation. 

The "Hiouse of Bondage" is one of 
the few plays we have had this win- 
ter which sustained the interest 
throughout and provided discussion 
between the acts. It makes people 
think. 



acter," as the saying goes, and a 
friendly sort of person to encounter, 
even if it is only in the mimic world. 
The play is well worth seeing for the 
first time and may be reviewed with 
profit. 



"Mrs. Wiggs" 
The company that has been playing 
at the Mason this week is an excep- 



ted Riding Hood" 

"Little Red Riding Hood" is a great 
improvement over iCinderella in many 
ways. The company hangs together 
better and a good deal of pains has 
been taken with the costuming. There 
is nothing like the distressing vul- 
garity of the sisters last week, and 
although the piece is far-fetched it 
is carefully produced. In fact it is 
too correct. It may be called me- 
chanically perfect but it certainly 
lacks in fairy fancy, in make-believe 
poetry. These plays are presented 
with the object of stimulating the im- 
agination of young children, which is 
an admirable object, but it does seem 
as if a little more elfin quality might 
have be-en infused into "Red Riding 
Hood." Furthermore both this week 




Marion Craig 

tionally good one. Each role was well 
filled and the actors played with that 
ease which comes from long practice 
in the same characters. Mrs. 
Wiggs is a wholesome, kind-hearted 
soul, chuck full of common sense, 
and possessed of the saving grace of 
humor. Blanche Chapman played the 
part of Mrs. Wiggs and Helen Low- 
ell was very droll as Miss Hazy. Her 
facial expression was exceedingly 
funny, calling forth repeatedly ripples 
of laughter. Mr. Stubbins was played 
by John F. Webber. He was success- 
ful in giving the tipsey scene without 
overdoing it. This is a play which 
has been before the public for a num- 
ber of seasons and one which is likely 
to remain popular for many moons 
to come. "Mrs. Wiggs" is a "char- 



Wentworth 

and last these fairy productions lacked 
in light. The final ballet this week is 
given in a light less full than it might 
be, and the result is slightly depress- 
ing. One feels the weight of the piece 
rather than its gossamer qualities. It 
is a credit to the management, how- 
ever, that out of much amateur ma- 
terial they have been able to evolve 
so good a company. And if they find 
enough encouragement to continue 
these plays they may impart more 
dream stuff into them. 

DON. 



giving the usual matinees on Wedes- 
day and Saturday and a special mati- 
nee on Lincoln's birthday, Friday. 

'ffiabes in Toyland" is a musical 
extravaganza of a high class and 
is the joint work of Glen McDon- 
ough, w'ho wrote the book and lyrics 
and Victor Herbert, who composed 
the music. Such a combination could 
not fail to produce a pleasing show. 
This is Mr. Donough's most preten- 
tious effort and he has supplied a 
book that is out of the usual and 
above the ordinary and the production 
is one of the most beautiful and taste- 
ful offered in a long time. 



"Faust" 

None of the stage classics afford 
wider opportunity for the display of 
modern stage ingenuity and crafts- 
manship than Goethe's immortal 
drama of "Faust," which is announced 
for revival at the Burbank theatre next 
week, beginning with a matinee per- 
formance tomorrow (Sunday) after- 
noon. For the past fortnight the elec- 
tricians and scene painters of the 
Burbank force have been hard at work 
upon this production. New effects 
have been devised for use in the fa- 
mous Brocken scene, showing the 
revel of demons. An artistic stage 
picture has been designed for the 
apotheosis, and elsewhere results have 
been attained, as evidenced in a full- 
scenic rehearsal held last Friday, 
which assures a remarkably fine pro- 
duction. 

However, "Faust" does not rely upon 
scenery alone for its popularity. The 
legend of Dr. Faustus is almost as old 
as stage literature. It is extant in 
every tongue and among every peo- 
ple. In its modern form the drama 
is based upon Goethe's tremendous 
work; but its genesis is lost in an- 
tiquity. 



"Babes in Toyland" 
For the first time in Los Angeles 
"Babes in Toyland" will appear at 
the Majestic Theatre next week, open- 
ing on Sunday with a matinee, and 



"The Red Mill" 

"The Red Mill," late of the 
Knickerbocker Theatre, New York- 
City, where it held forth for an en- 
tire year, with engagements of three 
months each in Chicago and Boston, 
will be presented at the Mason 
Opera Hiouse, Monday next for a 
week's engagement, with a special 
matinee Lincoln's birthday, Friday. 

This muical comedy, the joiny work 
of Henry Blossom and Victor Her- 
bert, and presented by Charles Dil- 
lingham's admirable company, proved 
the fourth consecutive success in 
which these clever comic opera build- 
ers have collaborated. The field of 
action of "The Red Mill," is laid in 
Holland. The first scene, an exter- 
ior, shows the red mill of the story 
at the edge of the little village in Hol- 
land. The second scene, an interior, 
gives us a look at the home of a well- 
to-do burgomaster. All of the peo- 
ple of the story are Hollanders, with 
the exception of two heroes who are 
New Yorkers and are stranded in the 
lowlands. Their adventures make up 
the main comic complications of the 
piece, including the sensational escape 
from the windmill on the revolving 
blades. 

The story is simple: Con Kidd'er 
and Kid Connor are two Americans 



stranded at a small Dutch inn. They 
have come to the end of their finan- 
cial resources and are in debt for a 
week's board. They are about to 
make their escape by means of a 
blanket from an upstairs window When 
they are detected by the burgomaster 
and only saved from imprisonment 
when they offer to work out their in- 
debtedness. Kidder, who professes to 




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PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



11 



what of a linguist, is made 
inter;' be inn ail'! 

Kidder I ml know)- 

nch, and when 
fronted tiy an irate French coantess, 
not understand English, his 
attcm ire laugh- 

able. 

♦ + + 

MUSIC 

Mme. Langendorff Concert 
True art means simplicity. Why do 
gel this fact? 
Mme Langendorff*: most pleasing 

work Tuesday evening last at Simp- 
Auditorium was in the songs. 
She, in spite of herself, had to act and 

- ie seemed to 
at time> that she was not singing in 
a heavy opera, but on the concert 
This singer has some tine 
qualities in her tone production and 
doubt, a finished artist in heavy 
German opera. Her program was not 
■- s i c a I as the I.os Angeles musi- 
cal public is accustomed to expect 
from an artist of her standing. While 
some of the numbers were well se- 
lected, a few of the songs were rather 
commonplace and unworthy of a 
place on the program of such a cele- 
brity. Why sing the Samson and 
'Delila aria in German when the 
French words are so very beautiful? 
Mrs. llennion Robinson always in- 
spires the audience with her musi- 
cian ly accompaniment. 

' MARIE ALICE RIORDAX. 

Sessions's Recital 
There is always a question as to 
whether orchestral music should be 
played upon the organ and if it is 
played as to just how far the original 
orchestration should guide the organ- 
ist in his registration. The Krebs 
Fugue in G minor is the sort of music 
heard to good advantage on the organ 
and Air. Sessions played it really well. 
The Guilmant Chorus in D was also 
a joy to hear — a grand finale to a 
good programme. Mr. Miller sang 
two arias from the Hymn of Praise, 
"Sing Ye Praise" and "Sorrows of 
Death", in his usual good style. Mr. 
Miller in producing his beautiful tones 
sometimes sacrifices the distinctness 
of his enunciation. 

G. B. 



Lott-Krauss Chamber (Concert 
Thursday, Feb. 11 

Quartette, C. minor ....Max Bruch 

Andante, Allegro ma non troppo 

Adagio 

Scherzo. Allegro Molto 

Molto Vivace 
Songs Waldo F. Chase 

Silent Safety 

Der Seelenkranke 

The Butterfly 

Meeresheimweh 

Fur Dich 
Quartette, B-La-F (To Mr. Belaieff) 

Sostenuto, Allegro 

Rimsky-Korsakow 

Scherzo Liadow 

Serenata alia Spagnolo. . .Borodina 

Finale Glazounow 

Quintette, A Major Op. 81. .. .Dvorak 

Allegro, ma non troppo 

Andante con moto Dumka 



I'nriam 
Finale, AM 

Mr- Mr. 

Dalhousic Young of London the 

allowing him to take her 
place at the piano in the Quintette. 

Kingsley's Opera Recital 

Last Sunday afternoon Mr. Kings 
tve his fourth I'pera recital "The 
King ol the Nilulungcn", instead of 
"Faust" a- advertised. lie first told 
the stories of the lour operas, illus- 
trating with the motives of I'm 
Cerent characters and idea-, then 
showed some very interesting colored 
pictures, including the more famous 
interpreters of V ["he attend- 

ance was much smaller than the 
worth of the recital warranted and ap- 
parently the only disappointment was 
felt by a little girl who asked. 
"Where's Cinderella'" 

"Parsifal" on next Sunday aftcr- 

i n should bring a packed house. 

+ * + 
Marion C. Wentworth, Reader 

Mrs. Marion Craig Wentworth is to 
visit Eos Angeles in March. She is a 
reader of unusual ability and not of 
the ordinary type. Here art is vivid 
and spiritual and extracts from each 
subtle phrase its inate and delicate 
meaning. She is willing to eliminate 
herself and by doing so all of her 
power is directed tow r ard illuminating 
the play which she is, for the mo- 
ment, interpreting. While speaking 
the magnetism of her presence is felt 
hut it is not an insistent element in 
her work. 

She will give "Mona Vanna" at 
Cumnock Hall, March 9, at three 
o'clock, to be followed March 11 by 
"Capt. Bressbound's Confession", by 
Bernard Shaw, On the sixteenth at 
the same place Mrs. Wentworth will 
give a play of her own, called "The 
Flower Shop", of which she says, "I 
want women to be free, and the 
theme of the play is the economic 
independence of women." 

While in Southern California Mrs. 
Wentworth will stop with her sisters 
in Pasadena. Miss Margaret Bell 
Craig has just finished a new studio 
in East 'Colorado street which will be 
ready for occupation before Mrs. 
Wentworth arrives. In Pasadena this 
gifted artist will give at the Shake- 
speare Club House three readings. 
"The Servant in the House", by 
tCharles Rami Kennedy, on the even- 
ing of March 5; "Adrienne" and 
"Barbc Bleue'. by Maurice Maeter- 
lick, March 12, and "The Sunken 
Bell", by Gerhart Hauptmann, March 
18. Tickets may be secured from 
Miss Alice Craig, 55 North Euclid 
street, Pasadena. The Pasadena read- 
ings will be at eight o'clock. Mrs, 
Wentworth will also appear before the 
Friday Morning Club. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Oje Baumg'ardt Lecture 
The Baumgardt lecture course 
started off auspiciously with a splen- 
did house. Mr. Baumgardt is sn well 
known here that nothing new can be 
said of him. His pictures were very 
beautiful indeed, the coloring ex- 



quisite The fines! : 

came from people who there 

and who declared Naples was just so, 

For his next lecture. London, he 
has secured some rare photographs 
which he will show for the first tunc 
Sunday night. We may be sure that 
old historic London town will be 

shown in it- full glory. 
+ + + 

LITERARY NOTES 



By Perez Field 

F. II. Cheetham is the author of 
"Louis Napoleon ami the Genesis of 
the Second Empire" (John Lane). It 

i- a life of the Emperor Napoleon 111 

to the time of hi- election to tiie presi- 
dency of the French Republic. Na- 
poleon III was so much hated that 
the centenary of his birth last April 
passed unheeded. His misfortunes 
made justice to him almost impossible. 
In the present volume Thomas Hardy, 
in a postscript, relates the following 
anecdote of the youthful days of the 
young prince: 

When the Rev. William Barnes, the 
Dbrset poet, was a schoolmaster in 
Dorchester he had as usher a certain 
Mr. Hann, a fair and rather choleric 
young man from the Vale of Black- 
moor. It was during the year that 
Louis Napoleon, afterwards the Em- 
peror Napoleon III, was residing in 
London; and at this time he paid a 
visit to the Darners, who then lived 
at Carne House, near the town. On 
Sundays, after service, it was the cus- 
tom of the burghers of Dorchester to 
promenade in "The Walks," as the 
boulevards are called, that then, as 
now, encircle the older part of the 
town; and on one fine Sunday after- 
noon Barnes and his usher, Hann. 
promenaded with the rest. In the 
stream of people moving in the oppo- 
site direction was a party of gay 
strollers from Carne House, which 
included, among others, Louis Na- 
poleon. The latter, in a sort of freak, 
just as. he was passing the aforesaid 



Mr. Hann, put his walking cam 
tween llann's I 

that the latter staggered 

fell, which caused laughter anion 

other promenadi 3 (who 

told the story t e) said thai the 

next thine of which he wa 

was of having Hann'- coal to 

into hi- arms bj hi- furious u hi i 
and of seeing I tann in hi- shirt -I. 
•pi ing in a pugilistii attitude in front 
"i Louis Napoleon and call upon him 

to defend himself before he was laid 
l'i "ii i hi gi a\ el, Tin gaiety around 
turned to consternation; Louis Na- 
poleon, wdio realized by this inn, 
that he had mistaken his man. apolo- 
gized profusely, and declared thai the 
intrusion of the can between llann's 
legs had been a pure accident I though 
Mr Rames said that he had seen 
without doubt that it was wilfully 
done). Hann, by degrees, cooled 
down under the politeness of the gen- 
tleman (whom he did not know), re- 
sumed his coat, and there the matter 
ended, to the great relief of the ner- 
vous ladies who were crowded near 
with their Prayerbooks and Bibles, and 
the disappointment of the boys and 
the less genteel of the townsmen. 



Mr. C D. MacKellar has told some 
queer stories of travel in South 
America in a book which he has just 
brought out. Here is one of them; 

Don Ludovico Soderstrom told me 
a story of Anibato, which occurs to 
me here. Many years before this he 
and a friend were at the Hotel Guyas, 
and after they had left, and had jour- 
neyed sixty miles, the friend sudden- 
ly discovered he had left all his 
money in a bag behind him. It had 
been under the pillow in his bed. and 
he had forgotten it. Of course, it was 
useless to think of ever recovering it. 
A month later he was back at Ani- 
bato, had the same room, and dis- 
covered the bag of money still under 
the pillow. The bed had never been 
touched since he left it! 

Prof. Saintbury in his introduction 



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12 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



to "Esmond" in the new Oxford edi- 
tion of Thackery, says: 

For, though there may not 'be much 
humor of the potato throwing sort in 
"Esmond", it will, perhaps, be found 
that in no book of Thackery's or of 
any one else's, is that deeper and 
lighter humor which takes all life for 
its province — which is the humor of 
humanity — more absolutely •pervading. 
And it may be found likewise, at least 
'by some, that in no book is there to 
be found such a constant intertwist 
of the passion which, in all human- 
ity's higher representatives, goes 
with humor hand in hand — a loving 
yet a mutually critical pair. Of the ex- 
traordinarily difficult form of auto- 
biography I do not know such an- 
other masterly presentment; nor is it 
very difficult to recognize the means 
by which this mastery is attained, 
though heaven knows it is not easy 
to understand the skill with which 
they are applied. The success is, in 
fact, the result of that curious 
"doubleness" amounting here, in fact, 
to something like triplicity — which 
distinguishes Thackery's attitude and 
handling. Thus Henry Esmond, who 
is, on the whole, I should say, the 
most like him of all his characters 
(though, of course, "romanced" a lit- 
tle), is himself and. "the other fellow," 
and also, as it were, human criticism 
of both. 



Doing anything for the fun of do- 
ing it is always better than doing 
something because you have to do it. 
The spirit of the attack is shown in 
the results.* This applies to writing 
as well as to other things. An au- 
thor who keeps all of his bread and 
cheese at the bottom of his ink well .is 
wont to find his writing fluid turgid. 
John Oxen discloses the right feeling 
in this note. 

"I took to writing of a night as an 
alterative (please do not let your 
proofreader make it alternative!) to 
the dull grind of business life, and I 
wrote for the sheer pleasure of escape 
into a new world of my own inven- 
tion, where I could, to some extent 
at all events, have things a little bit 
my own way. I' was not writing for 
bread and cheese, but for the pleasure 
of writing." 

George Gissing knew the bitterness 
of forced writing. He said in warn- 
ing: 

"With a lifetime of dread experi- 
ence behind me, I say that he who en- 
courages any young man or woman 
to look for his living to 'literature' 
commits no less than a crime." 

Miss Betham-Edwards, whose long 
residence in France has helped to 
make her an authority on French 
manners, says, in the course of an 
appreciative review of Mme. Wad- 
dington's book" 'Chateau and Country 
Life in France": 

In an interpretation quite apart 
from our own, a Frenchman's home, 
be it chateau, country house or cot- 
tage, is his castle. No golden key un- 
locks these ancestral precincts. One 
and all, in a certain sense, are as in- 
accessible as Monte Cristo's grotto. 
The open sesame is never a matter of 



money. In other words, while among 
ourselves only royal palaces and ducal 
seats are encircled with a Chinese 
wall, in France no one, irrespective 
of his circumstances, ever lets or lends 
his dwelling house. 

"Let a home to strangers, allow 
other folks to use our furniture and 
belongings!" said a French housewife 
to me the other day. "Such a course 
appears incredible!" The explana- 
tion of the matter is perhaps this: As 
the late Edmond Domolins pointed 
out, an Englishman is the best pos- 
sible machine ever invented for spend- 
ing money, a Frenchman the worst. 
Thus, as in England most folks live 
up to their incomes and most French 
folks far below it, here even princely 
mansions are left furnished every clay; 
across the water no such device for 
making up for financial deficits is 
needed. To get inside a French 
chateau, or, indeed, inside a French 
home, as a mere visitor, is equally 
difficult. As Pierre de Coulevain 
points out in his popular book, "L'lle 
Inconnue," "Mile, la France, should 
she open her house to you, would feel 
obliged to open her heart also, and 
the key of that she keeps more jeal- 
ously than is generally ibelieved." 



Another droll story that still lin- 
gers in my memory was of Lincoln 
attending a meeting of the Board of 
Trustees of the Illinois Lunatic Asy- 
lum near Springfield. The long hall 
being rather chilly, he thought it 
would be well to wear his hat. As he 
passed along, a little lunatic darted 
out from a door and confronting him 
exclaimed: "Sir, I am amazed that 
you should presume to wear your hat 
in the presence of Christopher Colum- 
ibus!" "I beg your pardon. Mr. Co- 
lumbus," replied Mr. Lincoln, remov- 
ing his hat and proceeding to the 
meeting. Returning half an hour 
later, having forgotten the incident, 
and wearing his hat as before, he was 
again accosted by the little man, .who 
drawing himself up, said in severe 
tones: "Sir, I am astounded that you 
should dare to wear your hat in the 
presence of General Washington!" 
"Pray excuse me, General," and Mr. 
Lincoln took off his high hat. "'but it 
seems to me that less than an hour 
ago you said you were Christopher 
IColumbus." "Oh yes, that is quite 
correct; but that was by another 
mother!" — J. G. Wilson, in Putnam's 
for Februarv. 



In Putnam's for this month the fol- 
lowing story is told: 

Something led Mr. Lincoln one 
evening to mention the fact that David 
Tod. the war Governor of Ohio, who 
declined his invitation to succeed 
Chase as Secretary of the Treasury, 
had occasion to visit Washington in 
1863. on government business. Dur- 
ing an interview the President re- 
marked: "You are perhaps aware; 
Governor, that my wife is a member 
of the Todd family of Kentucky, and 
they all spell their name with two 
d's. How is it that you use but one?" 
"Mr. President, God spells his namei 
with one d, and one is enough for the 
Governor of Ohio." 



New Books at the Public Library 

Life in the Open, by Charles Fred- 
erick Holder (Putnams, 1906 — No. 
799:89), is an impression of outdoor 
life and sport in Southern California. 
The author says the "hunting grounds 
of Southern (California are staged 
with unwonted effects — lofty moun- 
tains, pallid deserts, seas of turquoise 
abounding in countless game fishes", 
where the hunter's days may 'be filled 
out with aesthetic as well as practical 
experiences. 

Castles and Chateaux of Old Tour- 
aine, by Francis 'Milton (Page, 1906 — 
No. 914-4:50), gives a pleasant and 
rambling account of the well known 
castles on the Loire, with a number 
of drawings, etc. 

Leonardo Da Vinci's Note-Books, 
arranged by Edward MicCurdy (Scrib- 
ner, 1906— No. 854-29:V 77). The 
compiler and translator of these notes 
says in his preface: "My intention has 
been to present Leonardo as a writer, 
and to include in this work all pass- 
ages from the note-books of philoso- 
phical, artistic or literary interest." 

Mind in the Making, by Edgar 
James Swift (Scribner's, 1908-^No. 
150:90), treats of the psychology of 
learning, the racial brain, and crim- 
inal tendencies of boys. The chapters 
are reprints of articles which have ap- 
peared in various magazines. 

The Negro Races, by Jerome Dowd 
(Macmillan. 1907— No. 572-960:2), is' a 
sociological study of the Negritos, the 
Nigritians and the Fellatahs of cen- 
tral Sudan. He divides the life of 
these people in the banana zone, the 
millet zone, the cattle zone, and the 
camel zone. 

English Poems, edited iby Walter C. 
Bronson (U. of Chicago, 190S — No. 
821-08 :45A ), is intended especially for 
the use of college classes. There are 
two volumes, 1660-1800 and one for 
the nineteenth century. 

Lords and Lovers contains three 
plays by Olive Tilford Dargan (Scrib- 
ner, 1906— No. 812-49:0' 21-1;, of 
which one affords the title to this 
book, the remaining two being "The 
Shepherd" and "The Siege". 

Health and the Inner Life, by Hor- 
atio W. Dresser ( Putnam's. 1906— No. 
615-851 ;2), is a study of spiritual heal- 
ing theories, with an account of the 
life and teachings of P. P. Quimby. 

"The Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, 
by J. Ernest Phythian (Warne, No. R 
759-2:5), is one of Newne's art liter- 
ary series containing a number of ex- 
cellent illustrations which constitute 
the value of the book. 

Some of the pitfalls of building may 
be avoided by consulting the two fol- 
lowing books: Building a Home, by 
H. W. Desmond (Baker, 1908— No. 
728:24), and Rumford Fireplaces, by 
'C. Curtis Gillespie (Comstock, 1906 — 
No. 697-1:2). 

Rural School Agriculture, by Chas. 
W. Davis (Judd, 1907— No. 630-7:7). 
is a text .book for schools. 

A Christmas Greeting, by Marie 
Corelli (Dodd, Mead,. 1902— No. 823- 
89:C 79ib), contains a score of essays 
held to the page by a distressing green 
margin. 

Plane Surveying, by John Clayton 
Tracy (Wiley, 1908— No. 526-9:23), is 



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PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



13 



Abraham Lincoln, bj H 

! Iwin MiMasters Stan- 
ton 

Lincoln in the Telegraph Office, b) 

.* .* .* jf J* J> 



illec- 
- 

War 

• k when we arc c< lebi 
Lincoln's birth 
William Howard Taft. b) I 
King Davi - \ i 923 

731:27), i- in apparently hurriedly 
written sketch of the life of oui 
lenl issued for campaign 



.* 



o» 



Famous Actors and Arttistts 



\- critic, 

and dramatist. Comyns Carr, of Lon- 
don, has met many people and seen 
much of the lives oi men famo 

art. literature, and the theatrical 
Among hi- personal friends 
be has numbered nun like Whistler. 
ihn Millais, Rossetti, Burne- 
Jones, Irving, and Toole, concerning 
whom he tells many charming an 1 
Characteristic stories in his entertain- 
ing reminiscence.-. "Some Eminem 
Victi irians". 

There is an amusing anecdote, for 

instance, which tells how Sir Edward 

Burne-Jones tricked his doctor. This 

i-i told Mr. Carr that he 

had been to see his doctor, who had 

liim closely as to his habit - 

>mi -her 

"'How many cigars do you smoke 
in a day"'' he had inquired of his pa- 
to which Burne-Jones had care- 
lessly replied: 'Oh, I think about six.' 
'Well,' replied his adviser, 'for the 
present you had better limit yourself 
to three.' And. in detailing the in- 
to me afterwards, Burne-Jones 
d, with a chuckle: 'You know, my 
dear Carr, I never did smoke more 
I hree.' " 

There i- an amusing giimpse, too, of 
Rossetti, illustrating his outspoken, 
trenchant criticism of fellow-artist-. 
\t a time when people were "Turner 
mad." Mr. Carr sat beside Rossetti 
one afternoon while the latter worked. 
Presently "the late Mr. Victor Tebbs 
in fresh from an exhibition o 1 
old masters at Burlington House, and 
full of enthusiasm for a picture by 
Turner, which be insisted that Ross- 
etti must speedily go and see 'What 
is it called?' asked Rossetti. 'Girls 
Surprised While Bathing,' replied 
I el, lis. 'Umph!' returned Rossetti. 
'Yes, I should think devilish surprised 
to see what Turner had made of 
hem.' " 

Equally amusing is this quaint pic- 
ture of Rosseti's ahsent-mind>edness 
;il table: 

"On one occasion he was so entire- 
ly oblivious of tlie contents of the 
dish before him that, wishing to prove 
it- value a- a specimen of Oriental 
porcelain, be turned it over to ex- 
amine the marks on it-, back, and all 
Unconsciously deposited the turbot on 
tin table-cloth." 

Mr, iCarr recalls the charm of 
Whistler a- a host, and bow he found 
the brilliancy of the artist's conversa 
lion ample compensation For the 
meagreness of the menu in the days 



lisllcr's shifting financial fo: 

tunes. Whistler often invited friend: 

to breakfast with him when he lived 

tn Isea, and laughingly ti ild M • 

Carr on one occasi >n that his fish 

only tradesman who 

■ >uld afford to deal with him. 

"Bui I remember meeting." con- 
tinued .Mr. Carr. "during .me of the 
periods of narrow resources, a for- 
eign painter, who at one lime had felt 
himself greatly favored by an invita- 
tion I" Cheyiie Walk. 

"I asked him if he hail seen any- 
thing nf Whistler lately, to which he 
replied, 'Ah, no; not now so much. 
Me ask me a leetle while ago to 
breakfarst. and I go. My cab fare two 
shilling, "arf-crown. 1 arrive. very 
nice. Gold h-h in bowl, ver' pretty. 
But breakfarsts — one egg. one. toast, 
no more. Ah. no! My cab fare, two 
shilling, 'arf-crown. For me no 
more!' " 

Apparently one of the most candid 
critics of Millais was himself, judging 
from the following incident which oc- 
curred when Mr. Carr was associated 
with him at the Grosvenor Gallery. 
As the painter was walking round an 
exhibition of his own works, he re- 
marked: 

" 'You know, tCarr, as I look at 
these things there are some of them 
which seem to say to me, "Millais, 
you're a fine painter," and this is one' 
— pointing as he spoke to the beautiful 
picture before us — 'and there are 
other-.' be added, his tones suddenly 
changing from triumph to dejection, 
'that tell me just as plainly. "Millais. 
you're a vulgar fellow!" Oh, but 
there you are!' be cried, as though 
anticipating my polite protest. 'If 
you don't believe me, look at that,' 
and he pointed to a picture 1 need 
not now name, but which he looked 
at with unfeigned resentment and dis- 
gust." 

A curious fact is mentioned in con- 
nection with Mr. Samuel Carter Hall, 
the well-known art journalist, who at 
oik- time wrote regularly for '.he "Ail 
Journal." Hall was a quaint and curi- 
iHK figure of the time, and was sup- 
posed to be the model upon which 
Dickens based his superb creation or 
Mr. Pecksniff, "and." says Mr. Carr. 
"there were points in his character 
which readily lent themselves for ex- 
ploitation at the hands of -itch a mas- 
i ei- i -i' humi e 

Hall had a "confident faith in the 
reality of messages from another 
world." The spirits helped him in his 



writing, he tvowed Indeed, he must 
ly journalist « ho 

>poken, literally. with the 
if .lllgel- 

"Oh the-, occasions," he -aid. when 
I h.ne written something which I 
have deemed I" be particularly in- 
spired, I have often turned round to 
the Spirit whom I knew to he at my 
-ide. and have -aid. "Thank you. my 

deai sir; thank \ 

Mr Carr tell- a capital story of the 
late Sir Henry Irving'- meeting \\ 
I-'.. Henley, who had been criticisil 

_ii.it man'- acting unfavorably 
Irving was waiting his chance, and. 
turning the talk in the desired direc- 
tion, suddenly fixed Henley with his 
glittering , 

"I notice." be said, "that you do iml 
approve of my conception of Macbeth. 
Tell me now. for I should be inter- 
5ted to bear it, how you would play 
Macbeth if you were called upon to 
1 resent the character. What is your 
conception ?" 

Thus faced with the necessity of 
creation, the critic was absolutely 
speechless ! 

Mere is another story of Sir Henry 
which, although it may have been 
heard before, is well worth retelling. 

"It was while Irving was rehearsing 
'Becket' that he told me a story of 
Tennyson that has both a pathetic and 
humorous significance. In the earlier 
days, when 'The Cup' was in prepara- 
tion, he had been to see Tennyson in 
the Isle of Wight to discuss his- ideas 
for its presentation. After dinner, as 
he told me( the dessert and the wine 
were set out upon a separate table, 
and when they were seated the poet 
asked Irving if he would like a glass 
of port. 

" *Y r es, 1 like a glass of port," re- 
plied the actor. 

"Upon which Tennyson, taking him 
at his word, poured him out a glass 
of port and, all unconsciously, finished 
the remainder of the bottle himself. 

"Next morning the actor had lo 
leave early, and had therefore taken 
leave of his host overnight. But he 
bad scarcely awakened when he saw 



I'vllli; -on sitting at . 
hi- bl 

' 'How ate you this morning, Irv- 
ing?' he inquired, anxiously 

"Voj well indeed." wa- llis 
replj 

\r. you?' came the 

with just a tinge of doubt in 

"lull drank a l< I 
la-t nighl 

"That was Tennyson's wa. of re- 
penting aitei a bottle hi port I" 
+ + + 
Art's Progress 

"Vim have represented • upid « ith 
a revolver*" -aid an editor to his 
black-and-white artist. "Isn't it cus- 
tomary !•» arm the god of love with 
i bov, and arrow s?" 

"It has been the custom," replied 
the artist; "but even art nui-l keep 
up with the tinier." 

+ * * 
15he Dream 

He listened intently. It was his 
wife and her mother talking. 

"No, my dear." the latter was -.ly- 
ing. "I must go tomorrow. I do not 
believe in a mother-in-law making 
long visits. But, before I go, I want 
to tell you what a treasure I think you 
have gained in your husband. Hi: 
seems to me to be near perfection. 
Are you sure, however, that you are 
not too strict with him? Do not be 
quick to chide him when he stays out 
late. Men need a little latitude, you 
know — say, two or three times a 
week." 

The man stirred uneasily in his 
sleep. It seemed so real; but, alas! it 
was a dream. 



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14 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



WHicH Are Happier? 

With few exceptions modern novelj 
end just where they should begin. 
Between cover and cover they com- 
prise two or three years of amorous 
vicissitude. Then the longed-for 
opportunity arrives at last, the fateful 
word is spoken, hero and heroine fall 
on each other's necks, and the reader 
is left to surmise that they live hap- 
pily ever after. Whether the novel 
type of hero and heroine do or could 
live happily ever after is perhaps a 
question. They conduct themselves 
so amazingly different from the nor- 
mal type of man and maid that people 
who have gained their knowledge of 
the world in the school of experience 
may be pardoned a d'outjt. 

The love affairs of life are by no 
means ordered as in novels. How 
many men. and women now married 
can say that they made or received 
the sort of formal proposal which 
forms the grand passion scene of the 
novelists? Very few, probably. In 
general, what happens is this. Two 
young people are introduced, or "get 
to know each other." Finding special 
and peculiar, pleasure in each other's 
company, they seek opportunities for 
meeting more often. The pleasur- 
able acquaintance ripens into love. 
Each idealizes the other in some way; 
each finds in the other an affinity. 
They have many happy walks alone 
by sunlight and moonlight. They kiss 
when they meet and they kiss when 
they part, often risking a cold by 
lingering over-long at the front door 
or the garden gate, for, as Juliet says, 
"parting is such sweet sorrow." They 
promise lip to lip and eyes to eyes a 
thousand contradictory things, and be- 
lieve them all. 

Not a doubt ever comes into their 
minds that when they marry they will 
sit and hold hands, and bill and coo, 
and gaze longingly and lovingly into 
each other's eyes for long hours as 
tirelessly as they do now in. the dear 
sweet present. Truth to tell, the mod- 
ern novelists are right. They will 
never be quite as happy as they are 
now. There are few married people 
who would, not give much for the 
power to recall the days of their court- 
ship, with their blissful tenderness 
and "linked sweetness long drawn 
out." Those days linger in their 
hearts and minds as' a fragrant mem- 
ory. They may still be happy, or 
they may be not; but even when they 
are happy — and despite those who 
sneer at marriage there are many, 
many thousands of married men and 
women who are — they are happy in a 
different way. For when people 
marry they change subtly, gradually 
towards each other. Or perhaps it is 
that t'hey do not change at all. Per- 
haps they merely get found out. The 
ideal of courtship gradually fades 
away in the hard test of the real. 
Marriage discovers us for what we , 
are. Courtship discovers in us only 
what we may think we are. 

This is the reason the novelists 
close the chapters of their romance 
with that last passionate scene in 
which the hero folds the maid of his 
choice and yearning to his wildly 



beating heart. When and if it occurs 
as they depict, there is only one mo- 
ment in a lifetime when it is possible, 
and for a lifetime it must last. Tak- 
ing the average, people are less happy, 
or at least least differently happy, 
married than single. If the ecstacy 
of courtship were to last through all 
the years, how happy married people 
would be. One wonders sometimes 
whether in the greater number of 
cases those who are the happiest in 
courtship make the best and the most 
of married life. Wretched marriages 
frequently follow romantic court- 
ships; the happiest often follow mat- 
ter-of-fact courtships. Romantic peo- 
ple are usually the first to show their 
disappointment with realities; matter- 
of-fact ones often make the happiest 
husbands and wives. They expect less 
of happiness in marriage than others 
do, and for this reason, perhaps, they 
get more out of it by making allow- 
ances. 

+ ♦ ♦ 
TShe Doctor's Dilemma 

Isaac Goldstein had for some time 
been suffering from a rather com- 
plicated disease, of which none of the 
local doctors had been able to cure 
him. He was advised by a friend to 
consult one Dr. Heavycharge, who 
was a specialist in this disease. At 
the same time Isaac was told that the 
doctor's fee was rather a heavy one — 
$20 for the first visit, and $3 for each 
subsequent visit. 

"Vot?" cried Isaac, aghast, "twenty 
tollars for de first visit? I vill die 
first." 

However, he felt so ill on Christ- 
mas Day that he directed his steps 
toward Dr. Heavycharge's, and 
knocked at the door. 

On the doctor making his appear- 
ance, Isaac jumped to his feet, ex- 
claiming: 

™Goot morning, doctor! Here ve 
are again! Here ve are again!" 
* * + 

For Artistic Effect 

People who have no acquaintance 
with an art are inevitafoly ignorant of 
its practical demands, says an Eng- 
lish paper. They are apt to think ; t 
very easy to sit down and "write a 
little story," or paint a little picture 
out of the most ordinary material, not 
considering that the faculty of judi- 
cious selection is as necessary to an 
artist as his facile use of pen or brush. 
Mr. Frith offered large rewards for 
suggestions, and thus was often the 
recipient of strange advice. One day 
a stranger called 1 upon him, and, after 
some preliminary skirmishing in re- 
gard to the price of his valuable sug- 
gestion, said: 

"It's a review in Hyde Park." 

"I am afraid," said the artist, "that 
there is no novelty in that. It lias 
been done pretty often in the illus- 
trated papers and In pictures." 

As the man was evidently sincere 
in his belief that he had discovered 
a treasure, the artist endeavored to 
enlighten, him in regard 1 to the essen- 
tial points of a subject. 

"There must be a main incident of 
dramatic force, and secondary ones of 
interest," said he. "How could these 



be evolved from troops manoeuvring-, 
and a crowd looking on?" 

"Ah," said the discoverer, "I've 
thought of that! I should have in 
front — what you call the foreground, 
ain't it? — a man, selling ginger-beer. 
You must make him just opening a 
bottle; the heer must be very much 
up, and so the cork flies into a wom- 
an's eye, and then " 

"That's enough. I don't think your 
subject would suit me." 

"Well, but wait a bit, sir. Just you 
think, now; there might be a fat wom- 
an paying three-pence for a stand, and 
the stand breaks down, and she wants 
the money back, and " 

And the zealous discoverer of this 
remarkable subject could never under- 
stand why it was not adopted. 

* * * 

At the Hatching 
It chanced that the poet was out 
mooning around for material at the 
time of the first postal delivery. Thus 
it happened, that, instead of the let- 
ter itself, he found the slip bearing 
the intelligence that a registered let- 
ter awaited him at the postoffice upon 
his return. As he gazed upon the slip 
a frown of thought gathered upon his 
forehead. "I wonder what the dickens 
it is?" he muttered. 

Then a smile broke suddenly over 
his face. "By Shakespeare," he cried, 
"I'll bet my poem has won the 'Whirl 
of Fate' competition! And the first 
prize, too! They wouldn't send a 
cheque in a registered letter if it were 
■for anything smaller." 

As a riotous celebration of his 



happy success, he cast his pipe aside 
and lit one of his cherished cigars. 
"Let's see," he said, as he sank 
luxuriously back in his chair, revelling 
in the aromatic smoke, "$500! Mary 
shall have that sealskin she's been 
yearning for all these years; and I'll 
get a whole new suit all at once, and 
an overcoat. We'll go for a splendid 
tour. I must have a new typewriter 
in place of this worn-out old thing. 
And I'll get a bike. 'Miary needs a lot 
of new clothes, and, by Tom Hood, 
I'll get a dozen new shirts and collars 
and cuffs, so's to be stocked up at 
once, and an extra pair of shoes. 
•Then I'll lay in a store of 1,000 cigars 
— good ones — and 5 lbs. of tobacco 
and a dozen lead-pencils. And Mary 
shall have a cool fifty to do with just 
as she likes. Oh, isn't this a wind- 
fall? I must write and get her home 
from mother's right off." 

Just as he seized his pen there was 
a ring at the front door. A glance at 
the clock told him that it was already 
time for the second delivery. 

"Come in, come in, and have a 
drink, old fellow," cried the poet, 
flinging wide open the. door and at- 
tempting to shake hands with the 
postman. 

"Registered letter, sir. Sign here 
and there," responded that official, 
stolidly, thrusting his book into the 
poet's outstretched hand. 

With trembling fingers the poet 
dashed off his signature and ripped 
open the letter. A fragment of cloth 
first met his eager gaze, and then he 
read : 




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PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



15 



- hten- 
d time thinking 

+ + + 

A Scene in 1920 

m your name." 
"Oh, lh.it «.i~ I." -,iii! Il 

•toil early this morning, but I 
[red my miml. and wanl to 

. i W ■• 

+ * + 
Redhaired Scotchmen 
• wag has declared that it - 
the he dy's temper which im- 

the roil hue to his locks. This 

tion, however, has hoop indig- 
nantly repudiated, and the explana- 
tion offered that the - there 
are something like 2J4.I X '1 ) red-l 

men <"r 5 per cent. of the total 
population) in Caledonia today 
simply because auburn hair is a racial 
feature, ju-t as we find a predomi- 
nance of Id. mdes in Germanj 
Sweden and brunettes in Italy. 

Scientists seem to give no lucid ex- 
planation of these peculiarities of na- 
tional characteristics, beyond connect- 
ing different colored hair with differ- 

tored -kin-, says Tit-Bits. What- 
ever the real explanation might be, 
however, it would seem that, the 
further north one goes in Scotland. 

nore red-haired natives are to be 

North of the Grampians red- 

rairod Scot- are almost as numerous 

as the petals on the heather, while. 

ind alack! there is a distinct ex- 
if red-haired inmates in the 
lunatic asylums of the North-East of 
Scotland. 

Not that it is suggested for one 
moment that auburn locks are a sign 
of insanity. But, patriotic Scotsman 
though 'he is. J. F. Tocher, of Peter- 
head, in his address on "Col. a- Char- 

>," at the recent annual congress 
Of the Educational Institute of Seot- 
land, was obliged to point out this 
melancholy fact. If, however, there 
is no special connection between in- 
sanity and red ihair, then, of course, 
there must be a greater proportion of 
red-haired Scots among the popula- 
tion of the North of Scotland than 
elsewhere throughout the country. 

"She Discovery of Hard> 

It was while learning architecture 
that Thomas Hardy, the Wessex 
novelist, whom the inhabitants of 
Dorchester have paid the compliment 
of dramatizing and producing one of 
his best-known works, "The Trumpet- 
Major," began to write in his spare 
time. "Desperate Remedies" was the 
first result of his literary efforts, but 
though it found a publisher it achieved 



r the 

strolling bj 

I noon, and 
Stopped to have a look at the ■' 
Rummaging in the l>"\ he came upon 

." and. at 

l by the name, he bought i' 

reading it he saw that Thi 

Hard] nius I le sought him 

im a commission to write 

ry in the "Cornhill", and "Far 

From the Maddening Crowd" was the 

result. 

+ + + 

Particular 

The agent for a cemetery company 
icpatiating <>n the g 1 points of 

a certain lot. Presently the pro 
tive purchaser interrupted with the 
enumeration of several prominent 

families owning property there. 

"Is this lol near their.--" she asked. 

The agent admitted thai it was 
quite a distance off. 

"Then." said the woman, "1 don't 
want it. I'd rather pay more and gel 
mi a good neighborhood " 

The agent collapsed. 

"Has it come to the point," he -aid, 
"where people consider their next- 
door neighbors even in a graveyard?" 

"By All Means!" Said Papa 

"Yes, sir," said the pale, youthful 
suitor; "I have come t'o ask you for 
your daughter's hand. She is fair as 
lilies, sweet as honeysuckle, tender as 
a violet, charming " 

"Is that Mary you are talking 
about?" asked papa. 

"Yes, sir. It is a mere formality, I 
know, this asking for your daughter's) 
hand; hut we thought it would be 
pleasing to you if it were observed." 

Mary's papa stiffened. 

"And may I inquire," he asked, 
"who suggested that asking my con- 
sent to Mary's marriage was a mere 
formality?" 

"You may, sir," replied the young 
man, simply. "It was Mary's mother." 

V T V 

Sufficient Reason 

The old gentleman who was always 
declaring that boys were not what 
they used to be stopped in front of 
the smart child. 

"Well, Buddy," greeted the old gen- 
tleman, "how are you today?' 

"Wry well, sir," responded the 
smart child, shyly. 

"And do you ever think what you 
tire going to do when you are a great 
big man?" 

"N — no, sir." 

"Ah, I knew it. Children are so 
shiftless these times. And why don't 
you give it any thougiht?" 

"B — because I am a little girl, sir." 

+ + <• 
Gracious 

Judge: "You claim Mr. Coffin as a 
particular friend of yours?" 

Mrs. Killboys: "Yes, your honor; 
he buried two of my husbands." 



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PACIFIC 



statf- * 




Vol. VI. Mo. 7. 



Los Jlngeles, California, February 13, 1909- 



IO d nts $2.00 a Year 



Published Every Saturday 

Lissner Building. Los Angeles, California, by the 

PACIFIC OUTLOOK COMPANY 

Subscription price $2.00 a year in advance. 

Single copies 10 cents at all news stands. 

NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERS— The Pacific Out- 
look is mailed to subscribers through the Los 
Angeles Post Office every Friday, and should 
be delivered in every part of the city by Satur- 
day's post. If for any reason it should be de- 
layed, or be delivered in poor condition, sub- 
scribers will confer a favor upon the publishers 
by giving them immediate notice. 

Entered at second-clan matter April 5, 1907, at the postoflice at 
Loa Angeles. California, under the act of Congress of March {,1879. 

The Editor of the Pacific Outlook cannot guarantee to return 
manuicripta .hough he will endeavor to do to if stamps for that purpose 
■ re incloied with them. If your manuscript is valuable, leeep a copy of it. 



THE PACIFIC OUTLOOK'S POLICY 

The Pacific Outlook desires to state unequivo- 
cally that it is not the organ of any creed, sect, 
political party, organization, corporation or per- 
son, but is absolutely tree and untrammelled in 
its associations. 

It stands unqualifiedly, and without fear, for 
that which it believes to be true, clean, honest 
and right in human affairs — political, secular. 
commercial and industrial; and in its columns 
will always maintain an unprejudiced and im- 
partial attitude in its discussion of all subjects 
of universal or local interest. 

GEORGE BAKER ANDERSON, Editor 

COMMENT 



CALIFORNIA'S LITANY 



"FROM the wiles and crafts of Grove L. 
Johnson and George C. Perkins, two of the 
most blatant demagogues in our beloved 
slate, good Lord deliver us." 

If California were to adopt a Litany, this 
petition ought to have the first and last 
place therein. Listen to Johnson : 

"If Mr. Speaker simply says that the 
President wants this or the Governor wants 
certain action, it will cut no ice with me, 
as 1 feel I know as much about the Japanese 
question in California as they do, and more, 
too. The bills are perfectly constitutional. 
They are wanted by the people, and I be- 
lieve that the eastern people, if they under- 
stood the situation, would heartily indorse 
the bills." 

And this from President Roosevelt: 

"I am astounded at Perkins's conduct. 
He has for the last seven years done what- 
ever he could to hamper us in the upbuild- 
ing of the navy, and has acted against the 
real advocates of the navy. Yet now he 
advises a policy of wanton insult." 

If California go any further in the direc- 
tion of making a national ass of itself, it will 
be because it follows the lead of two such 
demagogues as Grove L. Johnson and 
George C. Perkins. Perkins and Flint, sent 
to Washington represent the State of Cali- 
fornia, have done what they could, accord- 
ing to Joseph L. Bristow, to discourage and 
prevent the establishment of a government 
line of steamships froun the Isthmus of 
Panama to Pacific ports of the United States 



that there might he some competition with 
the transcontinental railroads. This has 
been had enough, hut now. to cap the cli- 
max of Perkins's vicious career as a repre- 
sentative of California', comes his wanton 
effort to disturb the peaceful relations be- 
tween the United States and Japan — to pre- 
cipitate war, perhapi — after a seven years' 
campaign against the policy of building up 
an American navy. How proud the mem- 
bers of tin- State Legislature must be over 
their action in sending this man to the Con- 
gress for another six years! 

But in Johnson's case, of course, it is 
different. Johnson, he knows more about 
this Japanese case than anybody else. We 
have his word for it. He has confessed that 
he does. 

"From the wiles and crafts of 
most blatant demag'ogues in our 
state, good Lord deliver us." 
♦ ♦ ♦ 
JUST LOOK AT THIS 



the two 
beloved 



Los Angeles originally owned its own 
water system, which years ago was leased 
to private interests. In February, 1902, the 
city resumed control of its water system 
under the terms of the lease. Since 1902, 
in addition to paying out of its water rents 
the accruing principal and interest of the 
bonds for the repurchase of the water works, 
the city has built the entire water system, 
has purchased additional sources of water 
supoly, and has extended its water mains to 
meet the demands of a two hundred per cent 
growth in population. While it was occom- 
plishing these results it reduced water rates 
to consumers one-half, and placed the cost 
of water to its inhabitants at a figure only a 
little more than one-third of what the resi- 
dents of San Francisco pay — and it still has 
left a profit of over $700,000, which it is 
anphdng to the cost of the new Owens 
River water supply. It has expended since 
1902 nearly $4,000,000 out of its legitimate 
profits, reinvesting these profit.s for the 
benefit of the people. Such figures give 
some idea of the profits in water. They ex- 
plain the inner consciousness of the organ- 
ized campaign against municipal ownership 
in several cities. The results in Los An- 
geles have been achieved largely by guard- 
ing the administration of the water system 
against the intrusion of the political spoils- 
man. — Collier's Weekly. 
* * * 

A GLORIOUS EXAMPLE 



BY THE adoption of those amendments 
to its City Charter relative to direct nomina- 
nation and the selection of city councilmen 
at large instead of by wards, Los Angeles 
has taken a position well in advance of any 
other city of her size in America. A promi- 
nent lawyer of a northern city said the 
other day, referring to the result of last 
week's election : 

"Yes, it is true that Los Angeles has 
taken the lead among the big American 
cities, but you must not expect the example 



you have se1 to he followed, for the present 

at least, by my city. The reason: The 
reason is that the quality of citizenship in 
Los Angeles is. on the average, \va\ above 
that of most other cities in California. As 
a matter of fact. I presume that few people 
who are acquainted with the facts will have 
the hardihood to deny that the citizenship 
of Lis Angeles leads that of the whole 
country. While you may hardly expect us 
to fi How in your footsteps just now, you 
may tell your people, when the opportunity 
presents itself, that you have caused us to 
sit up and pay attention. You certainty 
have set the rest of the country a glorious 
example. Many cities willVant to wait and 
see how the Los Angeles idea is going to 
work out — what the outcome will be, say, 
three or four years from now. But in my 
own mind, and a great many intelligent men 
with whom I have talked recently agree 
with me in this, there is no question that 
your new scheme of government, with pos- 
sibly a few minor modifications, is the best 
whose adoption could have been expected 
at this stage of public thought." 

While there is much of truth in what this 
gentleman has said, we think he has hardly 
correctly gauged public sentiment through- 
out the state. There is every evidence that 
the people of California, as a class, are de- 
sirous of nominating their own candidates 
for public office. What has been accom- 
plished in this direction in Los Angeles can 
be accomplished in practically every citv in 
the state. San Francisco may be the last 
to adopt this plan, but, after normal condi- 
tions shall have been restored there, we 
look to see her boss-ridden political con- 
vention relegated to oblivion. 

Already thoughtful and influential men in 
other cities in California are beginning to 
agitate locally the question of abolition of 
the ward heeler and the ward boss as a 
factor in municipal government. Many of 
these doubtless feel like the gentleman 
whom we have quoted — that before inaug- 
rating steps toward the abolition of the ward 
system, they would like to see the pratical 
results following the adoption of the system 
by Los Angeles. 

It is therefore "up to" Los Angeles to be 
on her good behavior, — to continue to set 
a shining example for her sister cities in 
California. If, as a result of the first elec- 
tion under the new system, the stamp of 
men elected to legislate for this city shall 
not be materially better than those repre- 
senting certain wards at the present time, 
every city in the state will be justified in 
pointing the finger of ridicule toward us, 
and the ward boss need not he condemned 
for sneering: 

"I told you so." 

+ * * 
ITS POTENTIALITIES 



THERE IS small room for doubt a 
the outcome of the Recall election to be 
held in this city within the next two months 
and the official who has disgraced the fair 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



name of the city from one ocean to another 
will be relegated to a position where he can 
do no further harm. 

The election of Arthur C. Harper to the 
mayorality was brought about as a result 
of one of the most utterly despicable tricks 
ever resorted to by a coterie of machine 
politicians aided by a newspaper which 
turned traitor to the cause of the people at 
the eleventh hour. The responsibility for 
Harper as mayor, therefore, falls upon the 
Southern Pacific bosses of Los Angeles and 
their newspaper servant. It is now up to 
the people to become responsible for the 
election of a mayor whose administration 
will reflect as great a degree of credit upon 
the city as the administration now about to 
be terminated has reflected discredit. 

It is not probable that many citizens of 
Los Angeles realize the intense interest 
which is being exhibited in all parts of the 
United States over our Recall election. It 
is not strange that the situation here should 
have such widespread and profound interest, 
for nothing like it has ever before occurred 
in the history of the United States, — no, 
not even in the history of the world. It is 
logically to be expected that the man chos- 
en to suceed the deposed and disgraced ex- 
ecutive will occupy an extraordinarily con- 
spicuous position before the public eye, for 
he will be an anomaly. It is well under- 
stood that such an organization as the Mu- 
nicipal League and those associated with it 
in this most extraordinary political under- 
taking would not propose to place before the 
people for this chief office within the gift of 
a city any except the best available man in 
the city. 

What a high compliment it is, therefore, 
to be even so much as thought of or con- 
sidered for one moment as a man qualified 
thus to honor and be honored by a city of 
three hundred thousand people ! 

In spite of the fact that many of the lead- 
ing public men of California have had their 
eyes upon recent crises in state affairs as 
evidenced by the situation in Sacramento, 
we must not overlook the fact — and it is a 
fact — that Los Angeles has shared promi- 
nence, at least equally with Sacramento, as 
a point of great political interest. 

It may be that the man elected to succeed 
Harper will be besought to accept the next 
Republican nomination for the governorship 
of this state. Hardly had the name of W. 
D. Stephens been mentioned before men 
in other parts of the state, keenly alive to 
the possibilities arising out of the Los An- 
geles situation, predicted that Mr. Ste- 
phens's nomination for the governorship in 
the event of his acceptance and election 
would be inevitable. 

We direct attention to these facts, not for 
the purpose of booming any particular per- 
son as a gubernatorial possibility, but to 
show that the Recall is already recognized 
as an instrument of tremendous potentiali- 
ties. It does not require a man of the 
keenest and most far-reaching discernment 
to see the point. 

* * + 
NOT VERY 



ticians in Sacramento — Leavitt, Wolfe, Por- 
ter, our own Leeds and others of the same 
stamp. Such "performers" have no use for 
a direct primary that means anything. The 
sort of primary they want, and apparently 
are determined to get, is one that will please 
"dear Walter." 

It seems to us that the result of the recent 
charter election in Los Angeles ought to 
mean something to those members of the 
legislature representing this city at Sacra- 
mento. A word to the wise does not al- 
ways prove sufficient. Let us hope, how- 
ever, that in this particular instance it will. 
* ♦ * 
ABOUT "MY RECORD" 



A Washington dispatch, dated February 
7, referring to President Roosevelt's tele- 
gram to Governor Gillett, expresses amaze- 
ment at Senator Perkins's attitude on the 
Japanese question, saying: 

"Senator Perkins denied that he was an 
enemy seeking to thwart the progress of 
the navy, and declared that he would rely 
upon his record in the Senate in support of 
this contention." 

That Senator Perkins is a demagogue has 
been proven times without number. No 
further evidence to this end is really needed. 
But if it were, it would be found in his 
whine about "my record." 

Senator Perkins and Grove L. Johnson, 
of Sacramento, are twins, so far as "my rec- 
ord" is concerned. Johnson nearly always 
votes right. His "record," to the casual ob- 
server depending upon the printed journal 
of legislative proceedings, appears a good 
one. But the fact is that on many measures 
vitally affecting the welfare of the state at 
large, Johnson has been arrayed upon the 
wrong- side ; but he votes right when he 
finds that his efforts have proven unavailing. 

The people of California see through 
Johnson, and it now begins to look as if 
they were able to see through Perkins. As 
a matter of fact, the people have seen 
through Perkins for a long time. Perkins 
was not elected to the United States Senate 
by the people last month. He was elected 
by the Legislature. Wben the people are 
privileged to select their own candidate for 
United State.s Senator, there will be no fur- 
ther reference to "my record" by such men 
as Perkins. 

* * * 

TO THE PEACE SOCIETIES 



IT IS a foregone conclusion that Califor- 
nia is not to have a direct primary — that is 
to say. not so very direct — unless there is 
formed at once a coalition between those 
Democrats and independent Republicans in 
the legislature, more particularly in the sen- 
ate, who favor the kind of direct primary 
which the people of the state want. 

All the tricks known to political diabolism 
are being resorted to by the machine poli-- 



The Japanese are a sensitive, proud, and 
warlike race. The avoiding of war with 
Japan will be the most important foreign 
problem of the United States for ten years 
to come. We can guarantee peace by two 
things : maintaining a navy sufficiently large 
to insure a second thought after every im- 
pulse and provocation to fight, such as will 
undoubtedly arise ; and, even more import- 
ant, treating Japanese at all times with 
studied courtesy. The recent speeches and 
resolutions in the California Legislature — 
to segregate the Japanese in "ghettos," to 
prohibit them from holding land or becom- 
ing directors in corporations, to segregate 
their children in the public schools — these 
insults misfit more safely be put upon any 
other nation which has citizens living in 
America. And these actions, however they 
misfit have been pardoned a few years ago, 
in the light of a threatened influx of coolies, 
are now uncalled for. Through the recent 
understanding of the Federal Government 
with Japan, and the sincere efforts of the 
Japanese Government to carry out that 



agreement in good faith, the Japanese prob- 
lem on the Pacific Coast is settling itself. 
During the six months just past 2,074 Japa- 
nese came to the United States and 3,181 
went away — the Japanese population here 
was diminished by 1,107. For the Califor- 
nia resolutions there is no explanation but 
reckless demagoguery. — Collier's Weekly. 
* * * 

THE CREDIT 



ALREADY at least a score of daily news- 
papers in California have assumed the entire 
credit for the introduction and passage of 
the Walker-Otis Anti-Racetrack Gambling 
Bill. When Senator Wolfe arose in the 
Senate during the discussion of the meas- 
ure Thursday and said, "We are about to see 
newspaper legislation enacted here," he 
started something. And where that some- 
thing is going to stop no man wotteth. 

Hardly had the echo of the astute machine 
Senator's plaint died away before the edi- 
tors of two or three of this score of selt- 
conscious makers of history opened the 
windows of their sanctums, jumped upon 
their desks, clogged a few steps, and yelled 
at the top of their typographical lungs : "I 
"done it !" 

To those familiar with the magnificent 
campaign inaugurated by Earll H. Webb, a 
small daily newspaper in Berkeley, and the 
Los Angeles Express, with barely 1 a few 
days intervening, such nonsense as this from 
the San Francisco Bulletin causes a dull, 
sickening throb in one's medulla oblongata. 
Here it is : 

"For six months preceding the session of 
the Legislature the Bulletin ALONE car- 
ried on the fight. Other newspapers were 
either openly engaged in defense of the race- 
track, or they were silent and afraid." 

As if this were not enough to produce a 
tremendous seismic disturbance upon the 
mind of the state, if the figure will be per- 
mitted, listen to this from the Calkins ex- 
Calhoun Sacramento Union: 

"It was a great victory for the LTnion and 
Calkins chain of newspapers, and Republi- 
cans will appreciate it, especially, for the so- 
called 'reformers,' who had intended to 
make the racetrack fight a rallying point 
in the next campaign, even to the extent of 
handing over the state to the Democrats, 
have been foiled. * * * The Calkins 
newspapers are straight out Republican 
papers, and it must not be forgotten, nor will 
it be, that "the Republican majority voted for 
the Walker-Otis bill and that without that 
vote and support it could not have passed. 
The Republican party is the party of reform, 
and always will be." 

The Pacific Outlook is not seeking to lay 
the foundations for a challenge to mortal 
combat, either with the sword or the might- 
ier pen, with any other paper. It only re- 
grets that the supply of conceit appears to 
have been cornered by two valiant editors. 

It were a waste of words to recite the his- 
tory of the fight against the gambling hells 
maintained at Emeryville and Arcadia. 
There is probably not a man or woman in 
the state, who has paid any attention what- 
ever to the campaign, who does not under- 
stand that from its earliest stages prac-; 
tically every paper in California, excepting 
those suspected of having been bribed by 
highly-paid advertising, and two or three 
of the boot-licking machine organs, have 
stood shoulder to shoulder with one another 
under the leadership of the forces responsi- 
ble for the organization of the California 
Anti-Racetrack Gambling League. If any 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



ilKtllll 

ndcnt 
ami tl 

♦ ♦ + 

THE POWER OF THE PRESS 

HENRY M. \\ illis, of Redlands, 
member of th< senate, representing 

the thirtieth district, which includes the 
counties of San Bernardino and Inyo. It 
i> mi that he intends to remove to 

les and here continue his profes- 
sion. The people of thi- city, therefpre, 
naturally will take some interest in the po- 
litical record "t' Senator Willis. 

Senator Willis avowedly is no respecter 
of the press. He hates newspapers. He 
fears newspapers. Of course, he does 
exactly confess that he hates and fears the 
ccasion he treat- lightl) . 

even fantastically, with ridicule, the press in 

general, and particularly those papers which 
dared to commit the crime of Use 

majeste against the exalted personality of 
Henry M. Willis. 

That is .to say. he once did. But Henry 
M. Willis gives indications <'\ a change of 
attitude toward the press. A month ago, 
the pre-- — why, who cares for the news- 
papers, anyway? lint almost any clay dur- 
ing the past week or two Senator Willis 
might have been seen seated at his desk in 
the Senate Chamber at Sacramento, poring 
diligently over masses of newspaper clip- 
s, each hounded on the north by a blue 
pencil mark and a light yellow tag that re- 
sembles the emblem of a well-known clip- 
ping bureau in thi- state. 

Senator Willis is reported to have con- 
fided to one or two of his friends in the. 
Senate that the newspapers of his district 
have been "roasting" him, and all at once 
he has discovered that he doesn't like it, this 
"roasting." He doesn't like criticism — es- 
pecially newspaper criticism. He doesn't 
like his "record" discussed outside of Seat 
No. 7 in the Senate Chamber, which seat is 
occupied by Henry M. Willis. 

Great indeed is the power of the press 
when it will convert to a recognition of its 
influence so gigantic a figure in state affairs 
as Henry M. Willis, State Senator from the 
thirtieth district of the great State of Cali- 
fornia ! 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

ETHICS OF THE BAR 



AT A recent meeting of the New York 
State Bar Association, Francis Lynde Stet- 
son, a noted American attorney, made some 
remarks that are commendable as an ear- 
nest restatement of the facts which are too 
frequently overlooked but which are of gen- 
uine importance to the legal profession and 
the cause of justice and to the general wel- 
fare of tile public. 

Mr. Stetson suggested that the man who 
enters the legal profession chiefly for the 
purpose of making money selects a pour me- 
dium for the attainment of that end. While 
some lawyers do make much money ami a 
few amass fortunes, their class is few in 
number when contrasted with the remainder 
of the profession. The average lawyer is 
rewarded by smaller pecuniary returns than 
he would receive were he to devote an equal 
amount of study, time and labor to almost 
any other class of work-. We say the aver- 
age lawyer, and the word average ought to 
he understood. This is due very largely to 
the overcrowding of the legal profession. 
It is also due. in part, to the lack of money- 



making opportunities in practical legal prac- 
tice. 

In discussing this subject the New York 
Tribune -a\ - : 

All this i- t" be said on the supposition ili.n 
the lawyer is entirely honest and The 

ssion, "i course, affords considerable 
(unities for illicit gains, and tin- temptation !•> 
seek these is always present, and i- peculiarly 
strong who enter the profession solely 

or chiefly for tin- sake ..i making money. Thai 
i- the serious feature of the case. If a ni.ni be- 
comes a lawyer and cannot make a good living 
at tin- l>ar. In- alone i- the sufferer. I'm if, be- 
cause of thai failure t" secure a satisfactory 
income by legitimate means or because of greed 
for greater gains, lu- resorts t" dishonorable or 
practices, the whole community is con 
cerned. The administration of law and justice is 
\ itiated. 

This latter consideration makes welcome every 

such admonition as that of Mr. Stetson. It also 
makes it incumbent upon- every law school to 
insist upon such standards of scholarship ami 
character as will discourage overcrowding of the 

profession, anil will, so far as possible, exclude 
from it unworthy candidates. Every graduate of 
a law school should be made to feel, so far as 
faithful instruction can do it. that as a lawyer he 
is, in fact, an officer of the court, sworn to seek 
the enforcement of impartial justice, and that for 
him to seek pecuniary gains beyond legitimate 
compensation for honest services would be as 
reprehensible as for the judge on the bench to 
accept special remuneration above his lawful 
salary. 

With all of which we are reasonably 
agreeable. It is a deplorable fact, neverthe- 
less, that many lawyers who, in their own 
home communities, have attained positions 
of some prominence and have secured at 
least a modicum of popular respect, deviate 
somewhat from the straight and narrow 
path when they enter politics. 

The lawyer in politics frequently finds an 
avenue to pecuniary or other gain which 
will not present itself if he attends strictly 
to his legal practice. We have in the State 
Legislature a few specimens — and fortu- 
nately very few — of this type of lawyer. 
There ought to be a way by which the Bar 
Association may reprove and, if need be, 
punish those of its numbers who, as law- 
makers, disgrace their calling by adopting 
questionable methods. This is a subject 
worthy of serious consideration. We are 
not intending to treat it lightly. The legal 
profession will do itself proud and take a 
step toward a still more exalted position if 
it will devise some 'means wdiereby it can be 
freed of lawyers who sell their services as 
legislators as well as lawyers. 
* * * 
FISHING FOR FACTS 



For some time there have been rumors in 
Sacramento that all is not precisely as it 
should be with the Board of Fish Commis- 
sioners of California, commonly known as 
the Fish and Game Commission. The 
board's long and apparently unnecessary 
delay in transmitting its annual report has 
aroused suspicion. The political code de- 
clares : 

All officers, boards of officers, commissioners, 
trustees, regents and directors, required by law 
to make reports to the governor or legsilature, 
except the controller of state, must send the 
original draft of such reports to the governor 
before the fifteenth day of September, in the year 
eighteen hundred and ninety-two, and in every 
second year thereafter. * * * The governor 
shall, upon receipt of such reports, submit the 
same to the -late board of examiners, who shall 
order such a number of said renorts. or part or 
pans of each report, printed, as in their judgment 
will meel tin- requirements of law. 

The report of the Hoard of Fish Com- 
missioners has not yet been transmitted to 
the Governor, it is said. At any rate, it 



has not been printed ami copies thereol dis- 
tributed according to law. The delay, as 
we have sa cited suspicion. Harsh 

thin-- arc being -aid about the state Capi- 
tol about the r : i-h Commissioners. 

It has been hinted that the funds placed at 
the dispo-al of this body have not been used 
w it'll >\\\c regard 1m the welfare of the whole 
-late. Some have been unkind enough to 

i irculatii in t< > a rum< ir that an ii 
gatioti may show that somebody connected 
directlj or indirectly with the commission, 
of winch George Stone is president, litis per- 
mitted that body to participate, directly or 
indirectly, perhaps perniciously, in partisan 

pi ililieal undertakings. 

The Hoard of Fish Commissioners should 
insist that a full anil searching investigation 
be made, now that one ha- been demanded. 
Especially should that body deem an inves- 
tigation desirable and welcome such ;m in- 
quiry, now that Senator Wolfe of San 
Francisco, reputed to be a close personal 
friend of Commissioner Stone, has intro- 
duced a bill establishing a "state board of 
fish and game commissioners," which bill 
raises the salaries of commissioners from 
nothing to three thousand dollars per an- 
n-ttm. Technically the commission pros- 
posed will be a new body; but just what is 
intended by the law may be surmised by a 
perusal of section ten of the bill, which pro- 
vides that the new commission "shall suc- 
ceed the fish commissioners of the state in 
office, and they shall, upon qualifying, take 
over all property belonging to the state 
which is now under the control of the said 
fish commissioners." 

Before the fish commission, the fish and 
game commission to be or the political 
friends of the existing body or its official 
head may reasonably hope for the enact- 
ment of the Wolfe bill, they must take some 
step toward preparing to satisfy the natural 
and proper curiosity of many people of 
California relative to the inner workings of 
the existing commission. 

* * * 

ONE WAY 



JUDGE Ben B. Lindsey, judge of the 
Juvenile Court of Denver, asserts that if the 
women of Colorado had not the right to 
vote, and had not asserted that right at the 
recent election in the city, the professional 
gamblers, the saloonkeepers, the politicians 
and the public service corporations would 
have made short work of the Juvenile Court. 
He declares that it has been the women of 
this country who have brought about legis- 
lation for children. 

"It is the big business men, some of 
whom contribute to sending boys and girls 
away on a summer outing, who rob them 
by robbing the city through public fran- 
chises." says Judge Lindsey. "And these 
conditions prevail everywhere. We can 
make no real fight for the children except 
by fighting corruption in politics. The 
child's cry is a cry- for justice. We would 
never have been opposed in Denver if we 
had not fought political corruption. And 
we must fight the public dive keepers and 
the public gamblers, who are responsible for 
the hundreds of thousands wdio are hurled 
into our court every year." 

In discussing the development of the ju- 
venile court legislation Judge Lindse] 
the first juvenile court was established in 
New York and the next one in Boston. But 
it remained for Colorado and Illinois, he 
said, to put on the statute books in 1890 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



that a child could be corrected without be- 
ing charged with a criminal offense. He 
added: 

One of the courts in Pennsylvania declared that 
law unconstitutional; they said that it was class 
legislation, but, to the credit of Pennsylvania, 
that decision has been reversed. 

The next great step was the passing of a law in 
Colorado declaring that all persons should be le- 
gally responsible for the moral welfare of the 
children. Careless parents were held responsible 
for the moral life of their children. The laws are 
not designed to usurp the function of the home, 
but to help the parent in the discharge of his 
duty. 

The greatest dangers are brutality on the part 
of parents and guardians — for you lose control 
over the child when he hates you — and leniency, 
for the boy who mistakes your kindness says 
you are dead easy and he has only contempt for 
you. And you lose control over him' who has 
contempt for you. The boy who gets fair treat- 
ment knows that he is getting justice and he is 
loyal. 

During the seven years of my experience as a 
juvenile judge I have sent thousands of boys to 
: reformatory institutions, giving them tickets and 
sending them away unattended on long journeys, 
and I have never lost a prisoner. During that 
time the police have lost five prisoners, who got 
away. 

Our boys know that the state is fighting for 
them, and not against them. We are not senti- 
mental, neither do we advocate vengeance. In 
the fight for the children there is no justice with- 
out love. 

The true way to permanent reform un- 
doubtedly lies in the proper education of 
the youth of the land. Who will question 
the 'beneficence of. juvenile court work? 
Who will dispute the statement that such 
work also being done in Denver by Judge 
Lindsey and in Los Angeles by Judge Wil- 
bur makes a few better citizens in the ris- 
ing generation? 

Nasty nickelodorous shows, the hideous 
examples sometimes set by city officials, the 
promotion to high and most responsible 
posts of public trust of men who are willing 
to sell out their city, the martyrdom of the 
Woolwines — such things as these, in any 
city, if permitted to pass without popular 
rebuke, do not tend to encourage the in- 
herently weak among our youth to higher 
things. A city, like an individual, must reap 
as it sows. Just now Los Angeles is sowing 
good seed in administering richly deserved 
rebukes to recreant officials. Let us hope 
that the harvest will include a visible salu- 
tary effect upon the younger generation. 
Then shall we co-operate in a practical way 
with the courts which are striving to help 
children to help themselves. 
* + * 
WHAT DOES HE WANT? 



FOR MONTHS prior to the beginning of 
his trial Patrick Calhoun, who secured a 
franchise for an overhead trolley system in 
San Francisco through bribery, loudly de- 
clared that all he wanted was "justice." 
''Withhold judgment,'' he pleaded, "until 
my trial. I have nothing, to conceal." 
These were not the exact words he used, 
but they mean the same thing. 

Patrick Calhoun has never wanted justice. 
From the initiation of the proceedings up 
to the present moment every device known 
to tricky lawyers has been resorted to that 
he might be saved from the penitentiary. A 
few days ago Edward N. Sewall, a promi- 
nent insurance -man and one of the most 
honorable citizens of San Francisco, drawn 
on the Calhoun jury, was challenged by 
counsel for the accused briber, for the ex- 
istence of a state of mind that disqualified 
him. Mr. Sewall made it very apparent that 
he could render a verdict in accordance with 
the evidence, that he believed in fair play, 



that he wanted to see justice done; but he 
was excused. 

Patrick is not seeking justice. He is 
seeking acquittal, regardless of his inno- 
cence or guilt. No other interpretation of 
the course of his attorneys is possible. 

* * * 

CHILE CON CARNE 



By Autogenesis 
How Richard Strauss Composes. — Dr. 

Strauss' method of composing his music dif- 
fers greatly from that of most musicians. 
His best ideas, come to him not when he is 
alone, but when he is in a room full of peo- 
ple and during the hum of conversation. 
Suddenly he will leave the chatting throng, 
and retiring into a corner of the apartment, 
he will take out his notebook and jot down 
some imperishable themes, returning short- 
ly afterwards to his friends, and resuming 
the talk as though such a thing as music 
never existed in the world. A great deal 
of his work, too, is done while he is out 
walking- in the woods, and also when he is 
traveling by train, or seated enjoying .a 
meal in a restaurant. Beyond his music, his 
pursuits are few, probably his favorite way 
of spending the time being in card-playing, 
and in leading the "simple life" in his beau- 
tiful villa in the Bavarian Alps. 



Reyex and the Waves of the Sea. — A musi- 
cian who had composed a funeral march on 
the death of Gounod submitted it to.Reyer 
for his judgment. "It isn't bad," was the 
verdict. "But it would have been better if 
you had died and Gounod had written the 
march !" It is difficult to imagine anything 
more crushing than this ; but Reyer, though 
a little brusque, and sometimes a victim to 
his desire to say smart things, was kind and 
considerate at heart, and was very popular 
everywhere. When he was young he an- 
nounced — but did not publish — a work en- 
titled "On the Influence of Fish-tails on the 
Waves of the Sea." 



Thought on the Links. — The following 
story has been associated with the name of 
Mr. Oscar Asche. He began a round rather 
badly, but at length got in a really fine clean 
shot. Turning to his caddie, a dour Scotch 
youth, he said: "Now, then, I'm not the 
worst player you've carried for, am I ?" 
There was no reply. Later on, a long putt 
was successfully holed, and Mr. Asche cried 
again: "What did I tell you? I'm not the 
worst player you've carried for, am I ?" 
There was a long pause. Then the caddie 
replied: "Man, I'm just thinkin' !" 



History of Greece for Three Pence. — Prin- 
cipal Fairbairn of Mansfield College, Ox- 
ford, whose resignation is to take effect at 
Easter, comes of a family who has given' 
Dissenters twelve ministers in two genera- 
tions. A miller's son, born just over seventy 
years ago on the other side of the Tweed, 
he found his first congregation among 
farmers and miners at Bathgate, West Loth- 
ian. In those days, it is said of him, he rose 
every morning at half-past five for the pur- 
pose of study. He had a consuming passion 
for reading. His first book he found one 
afternoon while walking along Princess 
Street, Edinburgh. In an area below the 
street an auction was' taking place. The 
auctioneer was holding up a copy of Robert- 
son's "History of Greece," but there was no 
demand for it, and the auctioneer's eager- 
ness to sell prompted Andrew Fairbairn to 



offer the whole of his capital, which amount- 
ed to three-pence. When the book was 
knocked down to him, young Fairbairn ran 
up the street and did not stop running till 
he was home again. He read the book 
through, and he has been reading and writ- 
ing books ever since. 



A Methodist Mass. — Like so many of his 
countrmen, Dr. Fairbairn has a fund of dry 
humor. In a speech once he told how a gen- 
tleman of the "voluntarily unemployed" 
class approached his house. "Is his rivirence 
in ?" The maid, who had opened the door, 
smiled at this designation of her master, and 
replied, "Yes, he is in, but very busy. What 
is the message?" "Tell him I'm a Scotch- 
man and a Presbyterian an' I'd like a little 
assistance." "You have come to the wrong 
place," said the maid; "My master is Irish 
and a Methodist." "Glory be!" ejaculated 
the unabashed Irishman. "Sure, me mother 
was Irish an' her father was a Methodist. 
That's where I get a bit of the brogue, an' 
as for me Methodist grand-father, he was 
a great hand for attendin' mass in that 
church." 



Baden-Powell as an Actor. — Lieut.-Gen- 
eral Baden-Powell possesses histrionic abili- 
ties which would put to the blush those of 
many a professional actor. Once, when quar- 
tered at Aldershot, a man, anxious to draw 
the General's attention to some gun, always 
waylaid him on his afternoon walk. This 
happened so often that the General one day 
disguised himself as a navvy previous to go- 
ing out for his usual walk. On his way back 
he encountered the man. 'Slouching his 
shoulders and assuming a ferocious expres- 
sion he strolled up to him. "Are you the 
chap wot's lookin' for Baden-Powell?" he 
asked. "For if you are he has sent me out 



~«^*F- 4 *^ 



So.Bhoadvjiy <f &£SgS?pr> i So.Hlu. Street 
A. FUSENOT CO. 

New Wash Goods 



(£ 



UR assortment of Spring tub fabrics 
is unsurpassed in the city in points of 



Beauty 

Newness 

Extensiveness 



A special feature of the new line is the 
showing of 

BELGIAN HOP SACKING 

All pure linen, 46 in. wide, at $1.00 yard. 

This fabric is the latest New York craze 
for the construction of long coat suits that 
launder. The material is coarse and heavy 
but has a rich and lustrous finish. The 
colors are ultra fashionable and include: 
Beige, Cuir, Lilac, Ceil Delft, Vieux Rose, 
etc. 

Ask to see them. 






PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



im." He was 
never again disturbed in ins afternoon walk. 

An Athletic Actor — Mr !•'. K. Benson is 
^t athletic "i all Ei i 

•it-day actors, ami had he tn >t made a 
name for himself as an exponent of Shake- 

c, lie might have shone as a leading 
crick- a rival of Harry Vardnn. 

Then rj told to the effect that one 

day a certain young university man thought 
he would like tn go "ii the stage, and ap- 

hed Mr. Benson for an engagement, 
"Yes," sand the actor-manager, "Urn. let 
me see, do you play cricket-' "Yes." "FootJ 
ball?" "Yes," "Hockey or golf?" "A lit- 
tle' "Swim at all?" "Yes, I've done some 
swimming." "< Hi. yes, I think 1 can give 
i eement." The would-be his- 
trion was delighted, ami was just about to 
go, when Mr. Benson called him back. "By 
tlie way," he asked, "have you ever done 
any acting.?" This was the t'irM allusion he 
had made to the candidate's fitness for his 

prospective work, and. although this story 
may he exaggerated, it is certain that Mr. 
Besi n encourages manly games among' the 
members of his company, and to become a 
"Bensonian" is equivalent to becoming a 
better man physically all round 

Two "Rugbys". — Mr. Benson's love of 
athletics once led to an amusing little mis- 
take. While he was on tour some time ago, 
he sent a telegram to a certain young actor 
in London whom he wanted to play the part 
i if "Rugby" in "The Merry Wives of Wind- 
sor." Accordingly, he wired as follows: 
"Can you play Rugby? If so, come at 
once." Before long the reply came back : 
"Arrive at 4 p. m. Played half-back for 
Stratford." 



The Kaiser on the Phone. — The German 
Emperor has his own way of using the tele-' 
phone. Despite mistakes caused by the 
Kaiser's refusal to name himself at the open- 
ing of his conversation, he invariably intro- 
duces his telephone orders merely with the 
words, "I command that," and so forth. As 
soon as the chief of department hears these 
words he motions that his subordinate must 
at once leave the room. The significance 
of this arrangement is supposed to be that 
the chief is having something like an audi- 
ence with his Majesty, and that it would be 
presumptuous for a person not summoned 
to hear the Imperial voice to occupy the 
room into which its tones are conveyed. At 
the end of the conversation the Emperor 
walks away without saying "good-bye," and 
the chief with whom he has conversed must 
listen for five or six minutes afterwards to 
make sure that orders have been completed. 
Then he calls back his assistants, and the 
usual etiquette is resumed. 



"John" or "Meyer". — A woman created a 
panic in the Star Theatre, New York, a cou- 
ple of Sundays ago, by shouting "Meyer". 
She is not the first person to have a similar 
experience by a too free use of famil" 
names. Some years ago a man banged fur- 
iously against a locked door in one of the 
upper corridors of a hotel at Sharon Springs, 
and shouted "Meyer! Meyer!" It was a 
warm Sunday afternoon and most of the 
guests were in their rooms, many of them 
napping. Immediately there was a great 
commotion in the house and panic-stricken, 
scantily dressed people rushed through the 
halls and down the stairways. When the 
cause of the alarm was ascertained the pro- 
prietor told the man who had shouted that 



if he wished !•• remain in the hotel he W 

have to call his small boj John while his 

\i>it lasted, and "John" the boy remained 
to tie of the season's end. 

+ + + 

BoiH Blooded 

An Englishman fond of boasting of his 
ancestry : in From hi- pocket and. 

v* ..* J« Jt 



pointing to the head engraved on it. said: 
"My great-great-grandfather was made a 

lord li\ the king whose picture you si 

this shilling." 
"\\ 1: idi nee !" said his \ an I i 

companion, who ai mice produced another 
"My great great-grandfather was 

made an angel bj the Indian whose picture 
you see on this cent." — Pick-Me-1 p 



-•* 



o» 



Still More Added to the "Heaped up Measure" 




A Picturesque Corner of Riverside's Famous Hostelry 
Glenwood Mission Inn, Riverside. 
Sometimes a city makes or adds to its in- 
stitution — New York has its Statue of Lib- 
erty. More frequently the institution makes 
the city 



-Gi,enwood Mission Inn 



. We have in mind Riverside, Cali- 
fornia. Riverside has its naval oranges, 
snow capped peaks and abundant natural 
scenery, the grandeur of which is not usu- 
ally seen elsewhere in the world. But all 
this considered, how would Riverside appear 
to the traveler without its Glenwood Mis- 
sion Inn ? What other institution or condi- 
tion than the Mission Inn has done more to 
bring Riverside fame and add to its name for 
hospitality and a "Bide-a-wee" yearly for 
thousands of tourists and strangers from 
over all the world? 

And the Inn without Frank A. Miller's 
association with it? Thoughts make men 
and men make institutions and institutions 
add to cities' usefulness. But a man has'got 
to think right before he really begins to ac- 
complish anything worth while. And Frank 
A. Miller began to think right some years 
since. He thought of a tavern that would 
nestle in the midst of Riverside's famous 



orange groves and the chief corner stone of 
Miller's hostelry was to be comfort, good 
cheer and plenty of wholesomeness. 

We think Miller builded better than he 
knew. 

Today Glenwood Mission Inn is an insti- 
tution that is throughout the world known 
for its simple elegance, enduring hospitality 
and picturesque beauty. There is a charm 
about the Glenwood that gets into our mind 
and it roots out those thoughts of anxiety, 
' care and inharmony that so many of us want 
to be rid of. 

" 'Tis sweet to be remembered". The 
Glenwood guest soon knows what that state- 
ment means. The divinely bestowed bless- 
ing of remembering pervades the Glenwood 
atmosphere. ( ilenwood attendants realize 
that men and women are likewise individu- 
als and that individual tastes differ. And 
the Glen wood's guest's tastes and desires 
are remembered. The sojourner at the 
Glenwood is served and attended in a man- 
ner that cannot fail to make him look out 
upon a better and a happier world. 

It is a rare pleasure to visit Riverside and 
its Glenwood Mission Inn. 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



FORTHCOMING EVENTS 

Feb. 13 to Feb. 20 

Theatres Next Week 
Auditorium — "Ali Baba". 
Belasco — "A Texas Steer". 
Burbank — "A Temperance Town". 
Grand — "The Ameer". 
Majestic — "Rip Van Winkle". 
Mason — "The Master Power". 

Exhibitions 
Southwest Museum, 2 to 4 p. m. 
Hamburger Building. 

Blanchard Hall, Women Painters' 
Exhibit. 

Meetings and Lectures 
Today, Saturday, Feb. 13. 6:30 a. m., 
12:15 p. m. City Club. 
7:30 p. m. Club Jubilee, Y. W. C. 
A., Hill street. 

7:30 p. m. Playground No. 1, 
"Milk". Illustrated lecture, Dr. Geo. 
H. Kress, Violet street. 

7:30 p. m. Playground No. 2. 
Echo Park, "Evolution of American 
Life", Prof. T. G. Knoles of U. S. C. 
8 p. m. Commencement Exer- 

cises, L. A. High school. 

S p. m. Playground No. 3, St. 
Johns street, "Old Glory, the World 
Around", Mrs. G. Adams Fisher. 
Sunday, Feb. 14 
2:30 p. m. "The Breakdown of 
Protestantism", Ed. Adams Cantrell, 
Mammoth Hall. 

Opera Recital, "Faust", B. G 
Kingsley. 

8:00 p. m. "Labor Movement in 
England", Jack Woods, Liberal Club, 
Mammoth Hall. 

Monday, Feb. 15 
9:00 a. m. Board of Public Works. 
9:30 a. m. Board of Supervisors. 
10:00 a. m. Finance Committee. 
11:00 a. m. Arbor Day Committee, 
Chamber of Commerce. 

1 :U0 p. m. Ebell Club, Parliamen- 
tary Law, Mrs. J. A. Osgood. 

2:30 p. m. "How He Lied to Her 
Husband", by B. Shaw, acted by Mrs. 
Goldsmith, Mr. Southard and Mr. 
Beasley. Ebell Club. 

1 :00 p. m. to 5 p. m. School Bond 
Election, Annandale School House, 
Kagle Rock avenue. 

3:30 p. m. Water Commission, 
440 South Hill street. 

6:30 p. m. Orchestra. Rehearsal, 
Y. M. C. A., Hope slreet. 

7:00 p. m. Board of Trade, Holly- 
wood. 

7:30 p. m. Colcgrove Board 'of 
Trade, Cole's Hall. 

8:00 p. m. "Shakespeare's Religion 
and Creed", Dr. H. B. Sprague, Y. W. 
C. A., Hill street. 

8:00 p. m. "Merchant of Venice", 
Joseph de Grasse, Venice Auditorium. 

8:00 p. m. Dr. R. J. Burdette, 
"The Best Girl Ever", Y. W. C. A., 
Kill street. 

8:00 p. m. "Ladies' Night", Mr. 
Alfred Benzon, Gamut Club. 

8:00 p. m. Glee Club Rehearsal, 
Y. M. C. A., Hope street. 
Tuesday, Feb. 16 

9:30 a. m. Board of Supervisors. 

10:00 a. m. "Current Events", Mrs. 

M. M. Coman, Highland Park Ebell. 

1:30 p. m. City Council, Los An- 
geles. 

2:00 p. m. Lyric Club rehearsal, 
Symphony Hall. 

2 p. m. Ebell Club, "Dissociation 



of Consciousness", Mrs. Millard and 
Mrs. Flint. 

2:30 p. m. Police Commission. 

3:00 p. m. "The Winter Feast", a 
play. Read by Mrs. C. W. Foster, 
Friday Morning Club. 

3:00 p. m. Woman's Orchestra re- 
hearsal, Blanchard Hall. 

4:30 p. m. Civil Service Commis- 
sion. 

7 p. m. Farewell Dinner to Leo 
Valtus Youngworth, Levy's cafe. 

8:00 p. m. Orpheus Club rehear- 
sal, Gamut Club. 

8 p. m. "The Holy Land", Rev. 
F. Dowling, Altadena. 

8:30 p. m. "Bal Poudre", Good 
Shepherd Auxiliary, Kramer's Hall. 

8:00 p. m. Basket Ball Tourna- 
ment, Y. M. C. A., Hope street. 
Wednesday, Feb. 17 
10:00 a. m. "Chippendale Furni- 
ture", Mrs. A. Caldwell and Mrs. D. 
C. Barber, Ruskin Art Club. 

10:00 a. m. Hamlet, Act III., Mrs. 
Johnson, Ebell Club. 

10:30 a. m. Park Commission. 

3:00 p. m. Board of Directors, 
Chamber of Commerce. Last meeting 
of outgoing board. 

3:00 p. m. "Mrs. Ephemera and 
the Modern Drama", Mrs. G. V. 
Wright, Woman's Club of Hollywood. 

4:00 p. m. Annual Meeting, L. A. 
Chamber of Commerce. Inauguration 
of new board. Reports. 

4:00 p. m. Board of Directors, 
Southwest Museum. 

4:00 p. m. Board of Health. 

4:00 p. m. Sessions Recital, Christ 
Church. 

7:00 p. m. Board of Trustees, 
Hollywood. 

Thursday, Feb. 18 
10:00 a. m. "Dutch Landscape", 
Mrs. Barlow, Ebell Club. 

10:30 a. m. Fire Commission. 

7:30 p. m. "The Artist's Likeness 
of Christ", Prof. H. Alliot, First M. 
E. Church. 

8:00 p. m. Lecture in Russian, 
Mr. Scherbach, Bethlehem Institu- 
tion. 

8:00 p. m. Vernon Bettin, Boy 
Soprano, Y. M. C. A., Hope street. 

8:00 p. m. Concert, Immanuel 

Presbyterian Orchestra, Tenth and 
Figueroa streets. 

8:00 p. m. Annual Concert, Church 
of Our Lady of Loretto, Gamut Club. 
Friday, Feb. 19 
10:00 a. m. Supply Committee. 
10:30 a. m. "The Art of Singing", 
Mr. William Shakespeare of London, 
Friday Morning Club. 

2:00 p. m. Board of Public Works. 

4:00 p. m. Executive Committee, 
Southwest Society. 

4:30 p. m. Housing Commission. 

8:00 p. m. Reception to Y. M. C. 
A. by Y. W. C. A. on Hill street. 

8:00 p. m. "Merchant of Venice", 
Dr. H. B. Sprague, Y. M. C. A., Hope 
street. 

8:00 p. m. United Improvement 
Association, Chamber of Commerce. 

8:00 p. m. "A Scrap of Paper", by 
students of Occidental College. 
Saturday, Feb. 20 
12:15 a. m. City Club. 

5:41 p. m. Sunset. 

6:30 p. m. Severance Club, Hotel 
Westminster. 



Blanchard Hall Studio Building 

Devoted exclusively to Music, Art, Science 

Studios and '-'alls for all purposes for rent. Larg'St 
Studio building in the West. For terms and all infor- 
mation apply to F. W. BLANCH ARD, 
233 S. Broadway - - 232 S. Hill St. 
Los Angeles, California 




the last cmimb 

UUSTER^ 
^ROWN" 
READ 

COlOSAJKLlEJ 



printing... 

Rush Orders a Specialty 
Accuracy a Habit 

The Bolton Printing Co. 

220-231 Pacific Electric Building 
Phones: F-692 1 Main 52 1 3 We Never Disappoint 



Be sure to see 



THE HOLMES 
PATENT 



Disappearing Bed 

The bed that does not fold up 

Economize Floor Space, Furniture, 

Time, Labor and Money 

Display Rooms: 

671-681 Pacific Electric Bldg. 



LITTLE QUEEN BAB 

By 

DOROTHY RUSSELL LEWIS 

"Little Queen Bab is a sweet-tempered, unselfish wholesome little 
country girl who goes into the big city to visit her aunt and uncle, 
the latter a successful author, estranged from his farmer brother, 
father of Bab. How she brings the two together and spreads sun- 
shine all about her is the pretty iittle story." — The Graphic. 

"Young readers are sure to be delighted with the beautiful disposition 
of Bab, the little heroine." — Los Angeles Herald. 

"Little Queen Bab is only a snub-nosed, 12-year-old girl, but she is 
such a lovable little mite that she marches right into your heart at 
once, and stays there." — Los Angeles Express. 

"A story that ought to be in the h-nds of all children, or in the hands 
cf all parents, that they may read it to their children." — Pacific Out- 
look. 



"The story is a true inspiration for any child." 
Daintily bound in white leatherette, 35 cents. 



-Los Angeles Times. 



At AH Local Bookstores and Department Stores 



Reliability 



Is Our Watchword 



Our Pride Is to Be Known as the 
Most Reliable and Fairest Priced 



Jewelers in the City 



We invite your inspection of our DIAMONDS, 
GOLD JEWELRY, WATCHES, CLOCKS, SIL- 
VER WARE and RICH CUT GLASS. 



Brigden & Pedersen Co. 

MANUFACTURING JEWELERS 

WATCHMAKERS 

AND OPTICIANS 

507 SOUTH SPRING ST. HOTEL ALEXANDRIA 






PACIFIC OUTLOOK 




V© 



imc@~©sh 




By F. K. McCARVER 




Thi ni'.ir- 

It is only four- 
• and takes but thirty 
minutes to make the t rtj. over the 
ihortline route of the 1 os V 

electric linos. When the pro- 
ipleted the run- 
ning time to Venice will be reduced t" 
fifteen minutes. This will undoubted- 
i the best 
■ in California for all 
time to come. 

This splendid beach, appropri 
called "The Venice of America" i- 
destim to the New World 

what its venerable parent across the 
seas was to the old. Situated, as it is, 
in the center of the great crescent 
beach bordering Santa Monica Bay, 



w.is the men of this crew under the 
direction of Captain reeth, 

ii Japanese 
men on the lt>th of last 
cember. 

Plan to Extend Pier 
It is proposed to bond the citj of 
t'ark For 160,000 in the very 
near Future, to build the present pier 
1,020 feet farther into the sea. This 
will make Venice a commercial port 
ior small coast vessels and a stop- 
ping point for torpedo boats. 

1 'o protect the piling of the pleasure 
pier from a salt water insect called 
"toredo", which eats away the wood 
of the pil'ng, these big piles are to he 
■ I in cement live feet below the 
sand level to six feel above the high 
tide mark. 



There is al of i t I 

ment, ten feet wide, twenty sis 
long and fourteen feel deep in which 
several large seals an en. In 

the rear of the. exhibit department ol 
the Aquarium is a laboratory Eor the 

This room will he 
used by the students of the Universitj 
of Southern California. The Aquar- 
ium has been completely eepiipped by 
and is under the personal direction of 
Or. Charles s. Bentley, lately associ- 
ated with the Marine Biological I abo 
ratory at La Jolla, Cal. 

King of Bathing Pavilions 
The new- Plunge and Surf Bath 
House at Venice is one of the largest 
and most complete in the world. The 
structure, which is built of concrete 
blocks, is 239 feet long by 169 feet 




inevitably it will become one of the 
world's most famous watering places. 

This New World Venice is a product 
of the creative genius of Mr. Abbot 
Kinney, and, in making Veince an 
ideal city, no pains or money has 
been spared. It is substantial as well 
as beautiful. Windward avenue, the 
main thoroughfare, with its beautiful 
buildings, colonnades, arcades and 
true Venetian architecture, runs from 
the terraced steps at the edge of the 
big lake out to the entrance of the 
pier. 

The Pleasure Pier 

Walking along the avenue to the 
pleasure pier, one passes stores, ho- 
tels, offices, and the open air band 
plaza. The pleasure pier with its great 
Japanese Exposition, booths, cafes, 
great Dancing Pavilion, "Ship Hotel 
Cabrillo," beautiful Auditorium, new 
Aquarium, great breakwater, and as- 
phalt promenade, makes the Venetian 
city of America already the grandest 
amusement resort on the Pacific 
coast. 

Volunteer Life Savers 

Out on one end of the huge break- 
water, which is the only private one 
in the world, is located the largest and 

i complete life-saving station on 

the Pacific coast. The crew of this 
station is made no cf volunteers. It 



The Canals of Venice 

Life in "The Deep" 
The Aquarium, which was opened to 
the public on Sunday, January 17th, 
is not only interesting, but instruc- 
tive. As the educational element is 
the predominant factor of the man- 
agement along this line, it is their 
purpose to interest various schools in 
this new project so that the teachers 
and schools may have the benefit af- 
forded by the Museum and Aquarium. 
Besides the forty-eight tanks of salt 
water for all manner of marine life, 
this is a miniature home of the Ari- 
zona Cliff Dwellers, showing their 
home life, mode of worship, ladders 
leading to their holes in the rocks, 
their industries, and their mode of 
livelihood. Thousands of curios from 
the Cliff Dweller's regions are on dis- 
play in the museum. 

Vegetation of all kinds from the 
bottom of the sea is here displayed. 
Some of the most interesting speci- 
mens of the deep-water fish are shown 
in these tanks. In one tank are 
leopard shark, which were caught near 
the Venice breakwater. Others con- 
tain the hermit crab (Pargans); the 
rock-sculpin and kelp-fish, both per- 
fect examples of protective imitation; 
the octopus punctatus (the devil fish); 
and hundreds of other specimens of 
marine fauna. 



erves a a isit from every lovei ol 
the quaint. 
The magnificent \uditorium, loi ati .1 

on ili. pi, i . « hich « a., built in | 

I* i I'lin days, seats 3,700 peoph and 

lias a pipe organ whic i $20,000 

The entire building is a work of art. 
i lie new Moving Picture show 

building mi the pier is so constructed 
as I" make it absolutely fireproof and 
the interior electrical effects are most 
beautiful. 

Venice has a picnic pier, with a 
seating capacity for 2500 persons. 
This pier stands almost over the 
ocean and is protected from strong 
breezes, making it an ideal place to 
picnic. 

The beautiful Dancing Pavilion is 
one of the amusement centers of the 
place. This institution invites only 
the best conduct on all occasions. 

It is the largest pavilion for dancing 
on the Pacific coast and the manage- 
ment prides itself on the floor and 
music. 

The great pleasure park where the 
"midway" is located is filled with at- 
tractions of all kinds which afford 
amusement to the permanent residents 
as well as to the visitor. 

A grand electric fountain is another I 
attraction, while the biggest outdoor 
plunge in the world is a continuous 
source of amusement all the year. 



wide and contains 661 white enameled 
dressing rooms and a warm plunge 
150 feet by 100 feet on the surface. 
The tank ranges in depth from 3^ 
feet to 12 feet, and its sides and bot- 
tom are of solid cement five feet 
thick. It holds 500,000 gallons of wa- 
ter, and is emptied and refilled daily. 
In addition to the plunge bathers have 
the ocean surf, which rolls up on the 
beach just outside the pavilion. The 
capacity of this bathing institution is 
10,000 persons daily. 

Splendid Attractions 

The "Ship Cabrillo" invites atten- 
tion and excites admiration. It is one 
of the most unique cafes in the world. 
Built after the design of the old Span- 
ish vessels of the seventeenth century, j 



Fronting the Finest 
Beach on the Coast 

Hotel Decatur 



NEW MANAGEMENT 

B. SILLOWAY, Mgr. 

Modern 
European Plan 
Reasonable Rates 

OCEAN PARK, CAL. 



Phone Home 4422 

On the Lagoon Facing Wind- 
ward Ave. and Midway 

VISTA DEL LAGO 

ROOMS 



Single and En Suite 

Hat Salt Water Baths 

Moderate Prices 

M. D. Wetmore, Manager 

VENICE, CALIFORNIA 



Live at Venice 



"The Safest Beach" 



WINDWARD HOTEL 



NEWLY FURNISHED, STEAM HEAT, ELECTRIC LIGHT. 
HOT AND COLD, SALT AND FRESH WATER BATHS 

BAND CONCERTS DAILY 
Ship Cafe, Aquarium, Auditorium, Bath House Open Daily 
VENICE CALIFORNIA 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



The Ocean Front Promenade is thel 
finest in the world. Built of cement,! 
electric-lighted, and extending along! 
the beach for almost two miles withl 
the surf at high tide almost touching* 
its outer edge, it surpasses in many 
respects the much talked of walk at 
Atlantic City, on the eastern coast. 

Venice, in building to attract the 
pleasure seeker, did not overlook a 
most important asset in city life — a 
good public school. It is one of the 
features that this great resort boasts 
about, and is the pride of her resident 
citizens. | I 

Venice boasts of its tonic climate 
which does not vary over ten degrees 
throughout the year, thus enabling it 
to be "A Winter and Summer Re- 
sort." All the attractions are kept 
open the entire year. At night Venice 
has the appearance of a blaze of fire, 
being illuminated by more than 60,000 
electric light bulbs. 

Canals a Big Feature 

Above all the distinctive attrac- 
tions of Venice it is probable that the 



Ufihrubs, trees and beds of flowers, 
'making the district beautiful. 
The Villa City 

The Villa and Bungalow City is 
situated near the business center of 
Venice and is mostly built on the 
grand canal. The location . protects 
the "Villa City" from all strong winds 
but light breezes prevail here every 
minute. 

The Venice Villa City is the most 
beautiful, the largest, the most adver- 
tised and sanitary in America. There 
are over three hundred of these Villas 
and Bungalows. They are electric 
lighted and completely furnished, and 
the rental rates are exceedingly rea- 
sonable . The demand for these neat 
and charming summer homes is be- 
- coming greater each year. 

Running around the canals and 
among the residences of the canal dis- 
trict is the largest and longest minia- 
ture railroad in the world, covering a 
distance of two miles. 

I have not told you all about this 
pleasure city. It must be seen by day 



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Vbnice-on-the-Pacific 



canal system should rank foremost. 
In this pleasureable conception the 
quaint and picturesque vista familiar 
to visitors to the Adriatic may be en- 
joyed in duplicate, with the placid wa- 
ters flowing their winding course 
through flower-bordered banks, glis- 
tening under a cloudless California 
sky for an approximate distance of 
three miles. On these canals the pleas- 
ure seeker is seen riding in Venetian 
gondolas which ply their graceful path 
at the bidding of swarthy gondoliers. 
Those who prefer other means of con- 
veyance may utilize the numerous 
launches, row-boats and canoes which 
are always in readiness for the pur- 
pose at the boathouse on the lagoon. 

In the canal district are many of 
the finest residences on the beach and 
here many new homes will be erected 
this year. 

The canals are spanned by twelve 
arch bridges mad'e of cement and their 
banks are lined with thousands of 



and by night to be appreciated. I 
will take the liberty to say it is the 
"excursion point" of our great south- 
west, it has the safest beach, and is 
the grandest winter and summer re- 
sort in the United States. 
♦ ♦ • 
"Won by SHouting 
Lord Wolseley, whose health is 
causing his family and friends grave 
anxiety, was an engineer officer at 
the time of Sebastopol, and has made 
the interesting confession that they 
won some of t'heir engagements dur- 
ing the Crimean War simply through 
shouting. He had charge of the ad- 
vance sap, close to the redoubts. "I 
don't believe," Lord Wolseley has 
said, "that we had twenty-five fellows 
the last time we attacked. We were 
shouting, .shouting, shouting, and af- 
terwards I could not speak for four 
days, whilst some of the officers lost 
their voices for a week. We fired 
from behind a heap of dead bodies, 



and I told the bugler to blow his very 
loudest whilst we cheered, and so the 
enemy thought we had plenty of men 
in the rear." It was during the 
Crimea that Lord Wolseley lost the 
sight of his right eye, although it was 
in Burma, when quite a boy, that he 



received his first wound. A young 
brother subaltern who had lent a shirt 
to Wolseley just before the fight saw 
him fall, and exclaimed involuntarily, 
"There goes my one chance of linen!" 
Fortunately both shirt and wearer 
were only slightly damaged. 




Closing Out Our Pianos at Removal Sale 

You must not ignore this chance to place a fine high class piano 
in your house. The strenuous efforts we are making to effect a clean 
close-out of our pianos must appeal to everybody on the score of 
economy alone. 

All New Pianos Now 25 Per Cent. Off 

Very alluring prices on exchange pianos, as we do not care to 
remove them. Call early for nicest choice. We remove to our new 
Broadway store about February 20. 



113- 113 % SO SPRING 51 

•f* ©toe Mmik &W' 




Lissner 



l^il , 524 
?s S. Spring St. 



Fireproof 

Modern 

Central 



Desirable suites 
of from 2 to 5 
private offices 
with common 
reception room. 



A«.iH\TV.CT£.| 

* j Single Rooms as 

J Low as $12.50. 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



HIT OR MISS 

n, the 

Called 

uy. He passed through !.• 
md will return • 
luh later in the month. 



Mr Richard Krugcr ha9 ju~t 

• which he calls 
ight". This picture n 
at liis studio in the Majestic Theater 
buildi 



Mi" Goetz will entertain several 
• at Hotel Pepper next Sunday 
ing with a miscellaneous song re- 
cital 



Monday night the Gamut Club 
holds open house for the ladies. Al- 
fred Benson, Psychic, will be chief 

entertainer. 



Mr. William Shakespeare, the dis- 
tinguished singing master from Lon- 
don, has taken a house at 1256 Elden 
avenue, where he will remain for three 
months. Many students have already 
enrolled themselves among his pupils, 
thus taking advantage of this oppor- 
tunity to work under the guidance oi 
one of Europe's great instructors. 



Beginning on February 1, Dolge- 
ville. Glendale, Tropico and Alhambra 
were made branches of the Los An- 
geles postoffice. This will greatly fa- 
cilitate the delivery of mail. 



Miss Edith Wylie, who lived for a 
number of years in Hollywood, and 
who was well known there among the 
younger set. will come to the Majes- 
tic theatre on February 28 with Harry 
Beresford. She will appear in a prom- 
inent role in the play called, "Who's 
Your Friend". Miss Wylie was at 
one time a member of the Belasco 
company, where she acted in "Parsi- 
fal" and several other plays. Her re- 
turn to Los Angeles will afford pleas- 
ure to her many friends. 

Last week Dr. A. B. Sherer spoke 
before the City Club on "California 
and Japan". Having passed five years 
in the island empire he was well qual- 
ified to an address on the relation- 
ship between this state ot the govern- 
ment of the Mikardo. The figures 
which he gave seemed to favor gov- 
ernment ownership at least in the mat- 
in - of salt, camphor and tobacco. Mr. 
William R. George also spoke explain- 
ing the achievements and aims ol the 
George Junior Republic. 



sition to the democratic principles of 

ducation. It is pleasant i 
that during last week l>r E C Mo,, re 
signation of the onl> 
remaining member of a secret fra- 
ternity in the schools of Los Angeles, 
ganixations have been 
quietly hut firmly suppressed by the 
■ 1 of Education. 



Dr. J. R. Haynes left for Sacramen- 
to on Tuesday last to appear before 
the senate judiciary committee on 
Wednesday. He went on behalf of 
the Direct Legislation League to urge 
a favorable report on Senator Black's 
bill in regard to a constitutional 
amendment relating to the initiative. 

Teachers throughout the country 
have generally determined that secret 
fraternities were detrimental to the 
work in public schools. Thy are or- 



With the January number the Sierra 
Educational New- becomes the official 

organ oi the State Teachers' Ass 
lion. In an article. "A Plea for Affil- 
iation" Dr. E. C. Moore says: "The 
interests of all the teachers of the 
state are common. Our responsibility 
immon one: yet we do not work 
together. We have no common or- 
ganization, no common deliberation, 
and no common action for advancing 
the cause or the conditions to whose 
service we have dedicated our lives. 
The teachers of Northern California 
arc associated together, live or six 
hundred of them. The teachers of 
Southern California have an associa- 
tion, with a membership of about 
3,000, and the State Teachers' Asso- 
ciation numbers about 3,500 more. 
Many people, of late, have been urg- 
ing the necessity of federating these 
three great bodies of teachers. And 
federated or affiliated they must be if 
we are to serve the people of the state 
of California and the cause of educa- 
tion as we should." 



The Good Shepherd Auxiliary will 
give a "Bal Poudre" on Tuesday next, 
Feb. 16, at Kramer's Hall. The dec- 
oration of the ball room will be under 
the direction of Mrs. T. W. Phillips, 
Mrs. G. A. Bobrick, Mrs. Forve and 
Mrs. McCartney. A supper will be 
served and everything done by the 
women of the Auxiliary to make the 
entertainment an interesting one. The 
ball is under the management of Mrs. 
C. C. Desmond, Mrs. P. G. Cotter, 
Mrs. J. R. Grant, Mrs. Joseph Mes- 
mer, Mrs. A. J. Scholl, Miss Delia 
Fahcy, Mine. Ida Hancock, Mrs. L. N. 
Brunswig, Mrs. M. J. Schallert, Mrs. 
F. Schafer, Mrs. Daly, Mrs. C. L. 
Whipple, Mrs. H. W. Keller, Mrs. J. 
P. Delany, Miss Freeman, Miss M. R. 
Mullen, Miss Sussanne E. Lynch and 
Mrs. Vickery. 



The 20th annual report of the Los 
Angeles Public Library has just been 
issued, and it makes very interesting 
reading. It is not a laconic and weary- 
some report as such documents usual- 
ly are, but is full of animation and 
contains a most spirited array of sta- 
tistics. The attempts for library ex- 
tension seem admirable, especially the 
service rendered the playgrounds. 
One thousand one hundred and fifty 
worn out books have been sent the 
encampments of the Los Angeles 
acqueduct, where they have been ac- 
tively used. Dr. Lummis may well be 
proud of the showing made by the 
Public Library during the year that 
came to an end on November 30 last, 



Consulting Engineers of the Los Vn- 
geles aqueduct, is in town. Mr. 
man i* operating in the Big Horn 
Basin in the State of Wyoming and 
is here for a few weeks' vacation. He 
i- stopping with Mr. E. V. Vernon of 
Highland Park 



songs by Mr. II. \. II. Woodcock, 
the reading of the "Gettysburi 

die--" bj Mr Stanley Hale, and 
eral .nations b 



The New England Society 

em California in conjunction with the 
Civic League and the Lincoln Family 
Association held a meeting last null! 
in Simpson Auditorium to comnicmoi- 
at the 100th anniversary of the birth 
i i tncoln. The programme included 



John I afaige complained last week 

ii a reception given him in New York 

when the medal was handed him 

at that time by hi- on behalf 

of artists ami architects present, thai 
the honor came rather late. In re- 
ferring to the episode a correspondent 
writes us: "My personal acquaintance 
with the man and Ins work have long 



Gay N. Freeman of Washington. D. 
C, a mining engineer and cousin of 
John R. Freeman of the Board of 



The Misses Page 
Boarding and Day School 

Primary — Preparatory — High School 
Single Management but Separate in Location 



FOR BOYS 

137 West Adams Street 

Telephone Home 21203 

A splendid home for boys and 
also a well regulated school- 
home where the character train- 
ing of the boy is given the im- 
portance it deserves. The pro- 
verb "Train up the child in the 
way he should go; and when 
he is old he will not depart from 
it," is exemplified at this school. 
Boys here are taught manliness, 
obedience, punctuality, industry 
and learning in a way fitting 
them suitably as foundation 
stones for life's progress- Boys 
of any age after 5 years ad- 
mitted. Each boy is held to be 
an individual. Not being held 
back by class restrictions his 
progress is rapid and certain. 
Boys in addition to the regular 
school studies of our girls 
school are taught sloyd, mili- 
tary drill, vocal and instrumen- 
tal music, also the languages. 
The military department is in 
charge of Captain Robert A. 
Gibbs. 

The school has athletic field 
where boys are taught sports 
and military drill. 

William Himrod. graduate of 
Pomona College and Champion 
mile runner of Pacific coast, is 
in charge of boys' play and 
athletics. 

Call, Telephone or Write for Catalogue 

Pupils Admitted at Any Time 



FOR GIRLS 

243 West Adams Street 

Home Phone 21202 
Snnset South 3539 



Located like boys' school in one 
of most aristocratic residence 
sections of Los Angeles. The 
buildings are well adapted to a 
girls' school; wide verandas, 
upper balconies and beautiful 
grounds, set out to semi-tropical 
shrubbery. Miss Emma E. Page 
and Miss Delia M. Page, prin- 
cipals of these schools, are from 
Hiram College, Ohio, and both 
are Normal graduates. Miss 
Clara J. Armstrong, principal of 
the high school department, is 
a graduate of Oswego State 
Normal School. New York, a 
teacher whose exceptional abil- 
ity and experience along general 
educational lines is well known 
and established. 

Girls here are taught vocal 
and instrumental music, drawing 
and painting, physical culture, 
elocution; these in addition to 
regular school studies. 

Ample facilities are afforded 
for recreation and the girls' 
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PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



placed him at the head of American 
mural painters. If it was not for the 
great sacrifices of money that Lafarge 
made for Art with a large A, the mar- 
vels of American glass mosaics would 
never have been known, and this is 
only a small portion of his activities 
in the realm of the beautiful. To 
one whose fame is secure a medal 
more or less amounts to little. There 
is, to me, something sweet and grace- 
ful to have the gold medal of the 
League presented to the grand old 
man of the craft. To have this token 
handed to him by his own son and 
thus see that his work and his blood 
is twice honored at one 'TOie : s worthy 
of Florence, in its most glorious days. 
I am therefore painfully shocked by 
his acceptance of the medal and his 
attack on McKim, Mead and White. 
To thus spoil a feast of love is dis- 
courteous, petty and ungenerous. Cer- 
tainly inappropriate! The glory of 
advanced age, the test of true great- 
ness, is calmness and charity for oth- 
ers' shortcomings." 



The Kanst Art Galley is holding 
an exhibition of Indian Paintings, by 
Kate T. Cory, at 642 S. Spring street. 
Visitors interested in Indian life will 
find much to interest them there. 

An exhibition of modern paintings 
was held at lLong, Beach, before the 
Ebell Club, this week. The exhibit 
was under the direction of the Kanst 
Art Gallery, and Mr. Kanst and Har- 
vey delivered a number of lectures to 
the residents and school children. 



A Farewell Bachelor Dinner will be 
given to Leo Valtus Youngworth on 
Tuesday next at Levy's cafe. The 
committee in charge are George A. 
Fitch, G E. Nagel and M. H. Flint. 



Prof. Hector Alliot will give his in- 
teresting lecture on "The Artist's 
Likeness of Christ" at the First M. E 
church on Thursday next. The lec- 
ture is a free one and should attract a 
large audience. 

* * * 

AMUSEMENTS 



"Faust" 
In the play of "Faust" at the Bur- 
bank this week the devil made the 
most of his opportunities as he is 
said to do elsewhere, even outside of 
the theatre, as we are told. Animated 
by Byron Beasley he cut a brilliant 
figure in scarlet cloth, passing, the 
while, under the name of Mephisto. 
Strange to say this mythical imper- 
sonification of evil was received by 
the audience with enthusiasm, as for 
a familiar. His wiles were recognized, 
apparently, as pertinent and natural. 
"Faust" is well staged with pic- 
turesque scenes and agreeable cos- 
tuming. In fact, one wonders why 
women of today have not the taste 
to wear as becoming gowns as Mar- 
guerite, Lisa, and' Elsie have in this 
piece of stage craft. Each of the three 
made a charming appearance, and 
Louise Royce added to the amuse- 
ment of the drama in the scenes 
wherein she coquetted with his ma- 
jesty of the lower regions. The scene 
pn the Brocken was made glorious by 



infernal fires, actually falling on the 
shoulders of the hopping sinners 
whose woe so disquiets poor Faust. 
Indeed this popular fable is well 
worth seeing. What it lacks in sub- 
tilty it gains in panoramic effect for 
most of the coloring is soft and har- 
monious, particularly in the second 
and third acts. Miss Mary Hall made 
a tactful little speach of farewell at 
the opening performance of the week. 
Although she has been here but a 
short time, her departure from the 
Burbank will fill many theatr_ goers 
with regret, as her interpretation, of 
whatever part, has an individuality of 
her own, and an interest which leads 
to discussion. 



"A Stranger" Who Proves a Friend 

"A Stranger in New York" came to 
the Belasco this week and turned out 
to be not only a very good fellow, 
but a friend in disguise, so easily the 
minutes sped while in his company. 
Charles Hoyt was a clever playwright 
who presented life to his audiences 
in the lightest aspects and danced 
and sang his characters lightly around 
the whirligig of time. It is the purest 
fiction to call Mr. Stone a strangeT 
in Los Angeles but he assumed the 




Rip Van Winkle at the Majestic 

character of an unknown quantity 
with bonhomie, achieving a success in 
which there was nothing strange. Mr. 
De Witt Jennings as I. Collier Downe, 
played the part of a smart Alec who 
fails, very cleverly. Mr. Scott ap- 
peared in one of his skillful makeups 
and made the most of his derisive 
crys after "Topeka". Miss Oakley 
was charmingly arrayed as Hattie. 
Miss Noyes received a baker's dozen 
of bouquets on the opening night. Mr. 
Ruggles sang himself well into popu- 
lar favor. A Stranger in New York 
shows "high life" before the regrets 
begin and makes one believe for the 
time being that life after all is made 
up of cakes and ale. The final song 
by Miss Tannehill was musically the 
artistic success of the evening. 



"Babes in Toyland" 

Our theatres this week have been 
monopolized by musical comedy. A 
gorgeous extravaganza is Victor Her- 
bert's "Babes in Toyland", which is 
being presented at the 'Majestic by 
special arrangement with M. Wit- 
mark & Sens. Glen McDonough 




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11 



While 

: Mill". i»> 

ilrrc 
t and Fresh 

in infantile 
•ly capti 
he frolics, she 

- her curl — and the house i- at 
her i people in 

I that shi 
it all quite as much a~ they do. After 
■ had tin- iir-t glimpse of Gene 
inclined u< begrudge the time 
You even resent the 
tlitics "i Rodi rigo, the 
mental ruffian, and Gonzargo, hi* 
d partner, (ins Pixley, who 
plays Gonzargo, i~ a mighty funny 
fellow, even when you can't under- 
stand what he's saying. The 

ctive and novel, like 

- from favorite picture hooks. 
The chorus is lively and quaintlj cos 
turned, the lighting effects are well 



the B tighter, anil Fred 

ail to 

pop 

", which i^ 

: the inUSJl the piece 

The i When the World is 

lair" went particularly well Maurice 
jne's light lyric tenor was the 
only musical voice heard in the en 
tation of this musical com- 
i lis duet with Bertha, "B< 
You're You," was repeatedly encored. 
though, doubtless, the accompanying 
evolutions of the Kiddies .! 
credit for its success. Milton Daw- 
son, who impersonated Wilhelm, the 
funny little inn-keeper, has a quaint 
dialect and a refreshing -ruse of the 
comic; hut. on the whole, the com- 
panj was a disappointment. 

In the second ael. the specialties 

originally planned for Montgomery 

and Stone in the New York produc- 
tion, were well rendered by Wills and 
McNeil. The monkey is the star per- 
former in the organ-grinding episode. 
The Sherlock llohnes burlesque was 
dedly well done, and McNeil's 




IjEwis S. Stone op the Belasco Company 

managed. Eddie Redway is as light 
on his feet as a feather; Beth Tate, as 
Contrary Mary has moments when 
she is charming — hut Gene Ormoncfs 
Jane is charming all the time. Some- 
body ought to write a play for Gene 
in which she could play all the parts. 



Bowery tough was his best bit. Los 
Angeles is still waiting, however, for 
a high-class musical production of 
"The Red Mill." 

DON. 



"The Red Mill" at the Mason 
Because Herbert's charming music 
and Blossom's clever hook make "The 
Red Mill" one of the best things of 
its kind, the Mason has been crowded 
this week. Walter S. Wills, who 
plays Con Kidder, a traveler, "from 
America, where everybody works — 
everybody", is an amazing, amusing, 
contortionist-comedian, for whom the 
robust McNeil, as Kidd Connor, 
makes an excellent foil. Anna Mc- 
Nab, playing Tina, the bar-maid, 
dances with much agility and little 



"The Master Power" 

Only those plays are successful — 
speaking of the serious drama — 
which deal in a bold and fearless 
manner with some condition of so- 
ciety or the world of business or af- 
fairs as it is to be found at the mo- 
ment. 

We have had plays of the market, 
plays of tile half-world, plays of so- 
ciety as society, plays of American 
progress, plays of Western develop- 
ment, plays of the farm and plays of 
the city. But there is one condition 
as yet untreated among American 
dramatists of celebrity; the prescnt- 



statui of the South. 

of white- and blacks lllld 

regime of cqualit) Obviously, there 

■Id. startln. 
there which have baffled mosl novel 
nd have defied all dramatic pens 
for adequate ami at the same time 
artistic expression. 

Just -itch a play is Alfred Mien's 
"The Master Tower", which will he 
-ecu at the Ma-on I Ipcra I louse Feb 
ruary 15. Id and 17. 

Mr. Allen i- a young writer who 
leaped into national fami quite -ml 
denly last | lie winner oi 
famous "Town Topics" thousand-dol- 
lar prize foi the best Vmi i ii an 
drama. There were compi m 

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PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



judges represented a concensus of the 
foremost dramatic opinion in New 
York. The prize was unanimously 
awarded to Mr. Allen. 

At that time his play was called 
"Chivalry". But "The Master Power" 
has since been taken as a more ex- 
pressive name of the crying conditions 
of the present South that it so vivid- 
ly sets forth. No novel and no play 
of recent years contains so actual and 
strikingly grouped a picture of these 
conditions. Through it all Mr. Allen 
carries the tense thread of a throb- 
bing human story, working up his 
dramatic climaxes with the skill of a 
true craftsman of the theatre. 



The attraction at the Mason Opera 
House for the week of February 22, 
will be Clyde Fitch's latest comedy, 
"Girls", which ran for one whole year 
at Daly's Theater, New York, and 
which has been proclaimed by the 
metropolitan press to be one of the 
best comedies written in the past 
twenty years. 

"A Temperance Town" 
Oliver M.orosco of the Burbank and 
Majestic theaters has again given 
proof of his managerial acumen by 
announcing for next week's attrac- 
tion at his Main street stock house a 
big revival of Charles A. Hoyt's pop- 
ular purpose comedy, "A Temperance 
Town". This play has been present- 
ed at the Burbank twice previously, 
the last time when the Anti-Saloon 
campaign was under way. It may be 
merely a coincidence that brings it 
again to the Burbank stage when the 
city is expecting a recall elec- 
tion ill which saloons seemingly will 
provide the chief issue, and it may 
not. Of course "A Temperance 
Town" is not to be regarded serious- 
ly as an argument either for or 
against the liquor traffic, but it is 
nevertheless timely, as it presents 
several humorous aspects of that traf- 
fic as applied to a prohibition town, 
somewhere "down East". 



"Rip Van Winkle" 

Thomas Jefferson in his portrayal 
of "Rip Van Winkle" will be the at- 
traction at the Majestic theatre next 
week and he will present the play in 
a manner said to be more elaborate 
than ever given here before. Thomas 
Jefferson has already established him- 
self a favorite here on his last visit 
three years ago and he is now looked 
upon as an artist of rare ability and 
well worthy of the name he bears, 
Jefferson, a name which has stood 
for all that is best in theatricals for 
five generations. He is happily en- 
dowed by nature to succeed his great 
ancestors. 

"Rip Van Winkle" is well worthy 
of preservation to the stage. It is a 
delightful romance told in an entirely 
charming manner: its sentiment, its 
comedy and its pathos have the ring 
of sincerity notwithstanding the poet- 
ical and fanciful style of treatment 
and there is real human interest in its 
characters. That the p'lay possesses 
surpassing merits is amply proven by 
the length of time it has held the at- 
tention of the public. Even the gen- 



ius of the Jeffersons could not have 
for so long a time maintained popu- 
larity for a play that was valueless in 
itself. 

It was over fifty years ago that 
Joseph Jefferson brought out the cur- 
rent version of "Rip Van Winkle" at 
the Adephi Theater, London, but even 
that long lapse of time does not cover 
the period that "Rip" has held the 
interest of theater-goers, for Joe Jef- 
ferson's father and half brother, 
Charles Burke, together with himself, 
had played an older version long be- 
fore Dion Bouccicoult revised it for 
production. In all over sixteen thou- 
sand performances have been given of 
the play by the members of the Jef- 
ferson family, a record 'never equalled 
by any other stage production in the 
history of the drama. 



Shylock of Venice at Venice 

Mr. Joseph De Grasse and com- 
pany will give a performance of the 
"Merchant of Venice" at the Venice 
Auditorium on Monday next. Mr. 
De Grasse was for a long time a mem- 
ber of the Burbank company, where 
he was a popular favorite. Mr. De 
Grasse has made a careful study of 
the part and gives an interesting ex- 
position of the miser's character. 



Belasco Theatre Next Week 

Lewis S. Stone and the Belasco 
Theatre company will offer "A Texas 
Steer", another of Hoyt's plays, next 
week. "A Texas Steer" gives a fine 
stage exposition of American politics, 
and while other dramaticts have en- 
deavored to attract attention with 
dramas of Washington political life, 
Hoyt's achievement as represented in 
this work remains at the head of most 
such products. The role of Maverick 
Brander, the sturdy Texan who is sent 
to represent his district in Congress, 
cffers great possibilities to Mr. Stone 
to display his talents as a character 
actor. The part of Bossy, Brander's 
vivacious and lovable young daugh- 
ter, will be played by Florence Oak- 
ley. She has interpreted the part be- 
fore and should bring, to the role the 
very charming feminine traits that 
Hoyt had in mind when he wrote the 
play. The part of Fishback, the col- 
ored politician who deserts his Texas 
habitat for the purpose of securing 
the position of "Minister to Dahomy" 
will introduce James K. Applebee in a 
new line of work. Every member of 
the Belasco (Company will be seen in 
the production of "A Texas Steer" 
and .Scenic Artist Brunton promises 
a number of unusually effective and 
■beautiful stage pictures. 

Following "A Texas Steer", Mr. 
Stone and the Belasco company will 
give Captain R. C. Marhsall's comedy- 
drama, "The Second in Command". 



"The Ameer" Next 

Ferris Hartman and his merry com- 
pany of fun makers and singers will 
offer "The Ameer" the coming week, 
commencing with the matinee Sun- 
day. Frank Daniels played. "The 
Ameer" with more than ordinary suc- 
cess three years ago. It was one of 
Daniels's greatest laugh producers and 
served him better than almost any 



other piece he has had since he first 
attracter stellar attention. Frederic 
Ranken and Kirk La .Salle wrote the 
book and the lyrics, while Victor Her- 
bert, one of the most eminent and suc- 
cessful of all American composers, 
furnished the score. Hartman will, 
of course, have Daniels's original role, 
that of Iffe Kahn, the Ameer 01 
Afghanistan. It is a role in which 
Hartman ought to be particularly 
good. It affords him unlimited op- 
portunities for genuinely enjoyable 
fun making, while the vocal demands 
are not sufficient to overtax his near- 
baritone. The presentation of "The 
Ameer" will be specially notable in 
that it will serve to introduce Miss 
Christine Neilsen, the new prima 
donna of the Hartman company. Miss 
Neilsen has just terminated a con- 
spicuously successful engagement with 
the Princess Theatre company in San 
Francisco, while prior to that she was 
a prominent member of the .Shubert 
musical forces of New York. She is 
not only a beautiful woman — a blonde 
— but she has the added merit of pos- 
sessing a soprano far better than the 
average heard in musical comedy. 

Among the song hits of "The 
Ameer" are "Cupid Will Guide You", 
"Let Those Who Wed", "In. Old Ben 
Franklin Days", "A Soldier Needs No 
Truer Friend", and "The Little Poster 
Maid". 

Following this the Ferris Hartman 
company will present the famous Lon- 
don and New York success, "A Chi- 
nese Honeymoon". 

V V *& 

MUSIC 



I GROW HAJR. 



The Los Angeles Symphony 

The fourth concert given by the 
Los Angeles Symphony on Friday 
afternoon, Feb. 5, was in many re- 
spects very satisfactory. In spite of 
the rain the house was filled with a 
highly musical and appreciative au- 
dience prepared to listen to a well 
selected programme. The concert op- 
ened with Mendelssohn's second sym- 
phony in B flat, beautifully suited to 
celebrate Mendelssohn's one hun- 
dredth anniversary. The three move- 
ments were played exceedingly well, 
considering that so little time can be 
given to the thorough study of such 
difficult numbers as this symphony, 
and other heavy works, undertaken 
by the Los Angeles Symphony. I 
would mention that many artistic ef- 
fects are at times drowned by the 
brass instruments playing very much 
too loud and being flat. The Grieg 
suite "Signurd Jorsalfar" was played 
with understanding and gave pleasure 
to many, especially those who knew 
the composition. Mine. Langendorff, 
who was the soloist of the afternoon, 
sang the prison scene from Meyer- 
beer's opera "Le Prophete" much bet- 
ter at this concert than she did at 
her own, on February 2, to begin 
Jwith, at this concert she did not 
! omit the recitative. . The audience 
gave her an enthusiastic applause to 
which she graciously responded with 
Schubert's "Die Almacht" a composi- 
tion hardly suited for an encore. She 
sang Tsohaikowsky's aria from "The 




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PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



13 






Miss Coleman's Concert 

.nunc 
Her 

qualil 

rrangement, is well 

wing till' 

intellect and 01 

a little too slowly, otherwise 
singer's interpretation of it was 

Marie \\ dan. 



Mme. Langendorff's Last Concert 
Madame Frieda Langendorff ren- 
delightful and varied 
amine i" a small but immensely 
enthusiastic audience la-i Saturday af- 
Simpson Auditorium. Her 
soprano with an uu- 
usually wide range. She is brilliant 
rather than sympathetic, though her 
singing of Braham's "Lullaby" was 
charmingly sweet and tender. The 
following numbers seemed best suited 
r voice: "Im Herbst"; Franz 
Rossini's Aria. "Give Alms, Give 
Alms"; Henschel's "Morning Hymn", 
and "Ouvre tes yeux bleus" by Mas- 
senet. The Wagner number displayed 
to the full the wonderful power of 
her voice. The piano did not seem 
an adi compariiment for the 

latter song. She was furiously ap- 
plauded and gave two encores. 
Brahm's "Lullaby" and "Oh Press 

Thy Cheek Against .Mine Own". Jen- 
She has a gracious personality, and 

is delightfully free from all affecta- 
tion. It was a great pity that the 
rain kept so many from the enjoy- 
ment of a real musical treat. But it 
was interesting and pleasing to note 
the number of men in the audience. 
For many years few men, with the 
exception of fellow musicians or 
critics, have given themselves time 
for relaxation in a musical direction. 
Constance Praeger Fox. 



The Nowland-Hunter Concert 

However threatening the weather 
may lie. it can not dampen the en- 
thusiasm of an appreciative audience. 
The ensemble of the trio is much im- 
proved, as could have been expected, 
l.ut Mr. Nowland's pizzicato is still 
weak and his bowing careless. He 
draws a good, rich and vibrant tone 
hut too often lets his how slip on the 
strings. Mis intonation is generally 
true and his playing characterized by 
clearness in fingering and vigor of 
expression. It is too had that Mr. 
Gutterson's tine work is marred by 
an ugly, rasping- toned cello, more es- 
pecially noticeable on the A string 
Mr. Hunter's playing is at all times 
Sympathetic anil satisfying, fulfilling 
well the requirements of exact art. 

The programme gave prominence to 



a and the Northern, in tin 

minor i own Ami 

,1 by Arthur 
io in C minor, in which the 

brilliancy nch was 

hincd with the rare beauty of thi 

man style 

trade Barret) 



the firm that it is th 
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the instrument 



Sessions Recital 
Mr. Archibald Sessions will be as 

sisted by Mr F. Waller Seager. hary- 
in his next organ recital. Wed 
nesday afternoon at 4 p. m . Christ 
Church. The programme follows: 

« Pachelbel 

Musetti Dandrieu 

Preludi Cleramhault 

ta in C major I S 

Suite Elegaique Larotta 

I. Ilyninc. 2. Menuet. 3. Air. 

4 \llegro. 
Barytone. — "The Publican" 

Vaude Water 

In Paradisium Dubois 

Fiat Lux Dubois 



Orchestra Concert at Immanuel 
The Immanuel fresbyterian Or- 
chestra will give another of its popu- 
lar concerts at the church, corner 
Tenth and Figueroa. on Thursday 
night. Feb. 18. The membership 
is composed of amateurs and some 
few professionals, under the direction 
of J. C. Nichols. Mr. Nichols intends 
to give a hright snappy program, 
rather than a long arduous one, thus 
insuring appreciation from his au- 
dience. 



Josef Lhevinne, Russian Pianist 
Josef Lhevinne, who comes to Los 
Angeles for one appearance only on 
March 2 at Simpson Auditorium, is 
one of the many noted Russian pian- 
ists which that musical country has 
given to art. This concert will be 
Lhevinne's premier in the West, al- 
though he has played in the East for 
three consecutive seasons with great 
success. He is extremely popular 
with American students of whom he 
has a larger class than any other 
European teacher, and always throws 
open his beautiful home for their en- 
joyment. 

Miss Helen Goff 

Miss Helen Goff, a local concert 
singer of some considerable ability, 
will make her debut as a vaudeville 
artist next week on the Orpheum. 
Miss Goff is a convent graduate of 
Duluth, and since coming to Califor- 
nia has more than made good in her 
appearances in concert. 



Musical Notes 
By F. C. T. 
1 strolled into Birkel's the other 
day to hear their new piano player, 
the "VVelte-Mignon". and was agree- 
ably surprised at the performance of 
this wonderful instrument. Mr. Clarke 
was good enough to play a few selec- 
tions from some of the masterpieces 
as interpreted by the leading pianists, 
and in minute detail of phrasing, lone 
and touch it amply justified the as- 



tlire review 

interspersed with criticisms ami 



Mr. Joseph N. Whybark contem- 
plates forming a choral society to 
he called the Peoples Chorus. 

Mr. J. B. I'oulin of the Temple Bap- 
tist Choir, has in preparation Gaul's 

"I loh lily", a cantata, to gc go 
the Auditorium about March 1 by the 
choir of (he church an. I the folio 
soloists: Mi-- M I . R pi r, Mi - \ 
con, Mr. .1 l Greg . Mr. R M 

lid Mr J. J. Falls al the or- 
gan. 

The annual concert and reception 
..f the Church of Our Lady of Loret- 
lo, will he held in the Gamut i lul-. 
Thursday evening, February IS. The 
choir will present Gounod's "Gallia" 
assisted by Mr. C. Mortimer Stuart's 
orchestra and Miss Louise E. llocfcr. 
soprano; Mrs. T. C. Haskins, solo 
harp; Mr, Joseph Riccard, piano 



Mr. Thomas H. Fillmore will 
one of his monthly lectun 
day, Feb 19, in Music Hall. 3:30 p in 



Dr. Eugene Fl. Davis will hold a 
pupils recital, instrumental and vocal, 
in the Davis Music studio, Hamburger 
Building, Saturday. February 20, at 
7:30 p. m. Dr. Davis is endeavoring 
to make these recitals attractive by 



I 
Firsl M. I Sand. u : estra, 

E B \ all mine, director, « ill be held 
in the Firsl M. !■'.. Church Tuesdaj 
i b 16, ii 8 o'clock. 

■fr 4» + 
Women Painters Plan Reception 

One of the most important evi til 
of the season will he the First An- 
nual Exhibition of the Work of the 
\\ . .nun I '.miiI, i .. of Southern Califor- 
nia, which will open in I'.lam -hard Ml 
Gallery on Monday evening, with a 
brilliant reception to which over a 
thousand prominent people of South- 
ern California have been invited by 
special card. 

This exhibition, which lias been agi 
tated for more than two years, has 
been made possible through the kind- 
ness of I'". VV. Blanchard. who donates 
the use of his gallery, and of Everett 
C. Maxwell, the gallery curator, who 
has effected the plans for the coming 



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14 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



show. No event of the year will in- 
terest a greater number of people who 
have at heart the art interest of our 
city and are in sympathy with the 
work of women. 

Two score of well-known women, 
embracing those in society life, club 
workers, and the newspaper world, 
are working to make the opening re- 
ception a brilliant affair. The various 
committees are as follows: The jury, 
Nell Huntington Gere, Mary Gay and 
Marian H. Williams. The hanging 
committee, Nanette Calder and Ter- 
esa Cloud of Pasadena, and Lillian 
Drain of Los Angeles. Executive 
committee, F. W. Blanchard, E. C. 
Maxwell and Mrs. William H. Cole. 
Miss Leta Herlocker, who is chair- 
man of the refreshment committee, 
and Mrs. Spada, in charge of the mu- 
sic, will be assisted by the following 
well-known society young ladies: 
Misses Rose, Noel, Dickman, Wilcox, 
Rutherford, Hunt, Osborne and Else 
Walker. 

The patronesses, who will also as- 
sist in the receiving party, are Mes- 
dames Chas. F. Lummis, D. M. Rior- 
dan, Geo. J. Birkel, Wra, H. Cole, 
Harry Clifford Lott, Cornelius Cole, 
Randolph H. Miner, John Bigelow, 
and Misses Olive Percival and Cora 
Foy. 

* * «g> 

Xaft and Safety 

William Howard Taft said once to 
a friend of mine "'Be on the safe side 
no matter what the cost," and our 
President-elect showed by that short 
sentence how much he thought of 
safety. When he was Governor of 
the Phillipines he always showed that 
cool, deliberate judgment, placing the 
welfare of the individual higher than 
that of anything else barring, per- 
haps, the welfare of his country. 

The success of our great canal is 
largely due to his masterful insight 
to human nature and his many per- 
sonal kindnesses to the men them- 
selves always keeping tlrem as far 
from personal danger as possible. 

Nearly every owner of an automo- 
bile at times realizes to some extent 
the danger from gasoline explosion in 
case of fire. Last year there were 
several hvjndred lives lost and placed 
in danger from gasoline explosions. 
The safety and welfare of humanity 
at last is made possible, at least as 
far as gasoline explosion is concerned, 
by a new invention made in Califor- 
nia, and called the "United States 
Watch Dog". This device is mechan- 
ical, simple, and acts as a safety valve 
does to a steam boiler and when some 
laws are passed, regulating the use of 
such an appliance, on motor boats 
and motor cars, many lives will be 
spared and much property will be 
saved. 

* * * 
Very Instantly 

Officer: "You say the chauffeur 
sounded his horn just as the machine 
struck the man?" 

Witness: "Yes, sir." 

Officer: "Was the victim killed in- 
stantly?" 

Witness: "So instantly, sir, that he 
must have beard the echo of that horn 
in the next world." 



LITERARY NOTES 



By Pbrez Field 

A writer in the Times of India de- 
scribes an Urdu performance of 
"Hamlet" and Sheridan's "Pizarro." 
The "Hamlet" is entitled "Khoon-i- 
Nahak". 

Both tragedies undergo consider- 
able alteration in the process of trans- 
lation; but this is made necessary by 
the Indian audience's dislike of pure 
tragedy and love of farce. The very 
slight comic relief which Shakespeare 
provided in "Hamlet" is replaced in 
"Khoon-i-Nahak" by an elaborate far- 
cical underplot of servant love, while 
a more romantic turn is given to the 
story by the introduction of a rival 
lover of Meherbanoo (Ophelia). A 
similar farce, also suggested by the 
Oriental conception of the humors of 
love and marriage, has intruded itself, 
perhaps more justi6ably, into the 
sombre play of .Sheridan. It is true 
that these innovations have little real 
connection with the main purpose of 
the play. But to a European they 
are very interesting as illustrations of 
other sides of Indian dramatic genius. 

The minor female roles are per- 
formed by boys. These particularly 
interested the writer, for he had often 
wondered how the boys of the Eliza- 
bethan stage in England could be 
drilled into really losing their identity 
in the characters they represented. 
But when he found himself speculat 
ing whether these were boys or girls 
and when he saw the thorough way 
in which they entered into the spirit 
of their roles' — especially the "urchin" 
of Aseer-i-Hirs — he was no longer 
surprised that the boy actors of 
Shakespeare's time at one period 
drove their adult rivals out of popular 
favor. 



William Winter gives the following 
estimate of Benoit-Contant Coquelin, 
the great French actor who died a 
fortnight ago at Pont-aux-Dames: 

Coquelin's tendency in the dramatic 
art was toward the broadly comic as- 
pects of human nature, the grotesque 
attributes of character,' the absurdi- 
ties of experience, and those phases 
of life he often depicted with admir- 
able fidelity. Behind the question of 
technical proficiency there is always 
the question of individual superiority, 
of what can, perhaps, rightly be called 
artistic beneficence — the question 
whether the actor has been supreme- 
ly endowed by nature and is, for that 
reason, of extraordinary importance 
to the community. Coquelin did not 
fascinate either by intrinsic charm or 
acquired grace. In the atmosphere of 
poetry, as was painfully shown by his 
Don Caesar, he was a stranger. His 
temperament being cold, he could not 
always simulate the excitement that 
is essential through perfect conceal- 
ment of art to make imitation seem 
reality. On the other hand, he pos- 
sessed strength of character, force of 
brain, — notably signified in mental 
poise and in will, — and he had an 
affluent fund of droll humor. His self- 
possession was extraordinary, show- 
ing itself in his repose, deliberate pre- 
cision and elaborate detail. 



Among Coquelin's pricipal charac-' 
ters were: 

Figaro, in "Le Mariage de Figaro". 

Diafoirus, in "Malade Imaginaire". 

Argante, in "Les Fourberies de 
Scapin". 

Lesbonnard; in "La Viste de Noces". 

Don Annibal, in "L'Arenturiere". 

Labussiere, in "Thermidor". 

Aristide, in "Le Lion Amoureux". 

Cyrano, .in "Cyrano de Bergerac". 

Flambeau, in "L'Aiglon". 

Leopold, in "Les Four Chambault". 

Scarpia, in "La Tosca". 

First Gravedigger in "Hamlet". 

Due de Septmonts, in "L'Etran- 
gere". 

Mascarile, in "Les Precieuses Ridi- 
cules". 

Mathias, in "The Bells". 

Don Caesar, in "Don Caesar de 
Bazan". 

Tartuffe, in "Tartuffe". 

Chicot, in "La Dame de Mon- 
soreau". 

Jean Valjean, in "Les Miserables". 

He also acted in perversions called 
"La M-egere Apprivoisee" and "Fal- 
staff", being plays derived, for his use, 
by M. Paul Blair, from, respectively, 
"The Taming of the Shrew", and "The 
Merry Wives of Windsor" and the 
two parts of "Henry IV". 



In "The Pleasant Land of France," 
Rowland E. Prothero has gathered 
together six or seven of his fugitive 
essays, which form a most entertain- 
ing volume on French traits. He 
says, among other things, that the 
average Frenchman remains, through- 



out his life, in many respects a child, 
just as the average Englishman re- 
mains, if not a schoolboy, an under- 
graduate.- The Frenchman se range, 
when his English contemporary is 
wandering in the Rocky Mountains of 
thought or of reality. Sometimes for 
better, sometimes for worse, many of 
the national characteristics are gov- 
erned by the fact that the intermedi- 
ate stage between the child and the 
man — that of boyhood — is "a transition 
through which the one never passes, 
and from which the other never 
emerges. A Frenchman, for example, 
courts admiration with the simplicity 
of a child, he has a child's boastful- 
ness, and a child's power of making 
believe. He calls the solitary box tree 
in a painted barrel, by the side of 
which he drinks his coffee, a bosquet 
de verdure; he describes his square 
yard of garden, with its miniature bed 
of dahlias, as a vaste jardin d'agre- 
ment; with the eagerness of a six- 
year-old, he solicits your appreciation 
of their beauties. To him they are 
what he says; he prizes them, not at 
their material, but at their relative 
value. He has fathomed the true se- 
cret of happiness, and is a wiser 
philosopher than the man who sneers. 
At least he is no hypocrite like the 
Englishman, who would rather bite 
his tongue off , than express all the 
admiration that he feels for his own 
possessions — who affects to belittle 
them, describes his rural palace con- 
temptuously as the "little bachelor 
box in the country," and would be 
/seriously offended if his depreciation 
were accepted literally. 




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PACIFIC 




Vol. VI. Mo. 8. 



Los Jlngeles, California, February 20, I909- 



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THE PACIFIC OUTLOOK'S POLICY 
The Pacific Outlook desires to state unequivo- 
cally that it is not the organ of any creed, sect, 
political party, organization, corporation or per- 
son, but is absolutely free and untrammelled in 
its associations. 

It stands unqualifiedly, and without fear, for 
that which it believes to be true, clean, honest 
and right in human affairs — political, secular. 
commercial and industrial; and in its columns 
will always maintain an unprejudiced and im- 
partial attitude in its discussion of all subjects 
of universal or local interest. 

GEORGE BAKER ANDERSON, Editor 



COMMENT 



STANTON 



ADMIRAL Sampson to the President of 
the United Slates.— 1898: "I take pleas- 
ure in handing a magnificent present to the 
people of the United States." 

Speaker Philip A. Stanton to the Legis- 
lature of California.— 1909 : "I feel the 
ground slipping from beneath my feet." 

"Los \ngcles, February 7. — (By Asso- 
ciated Tress). Speaker Stanton of the 
State Assembly has received another 
lengthy telegram from President Roose- 
velt on the subject of Japanese legislation 
by the California Legislature, but declined 
to make public its contents. In reply to a 
question regarding the president's telegram, 
he at first said that he could make nothing 
of the kind public without the president's 
sanction, and then later denied that he had 
received any such message from the presi- 
dent. 'You understand,' the speaker said, 
'that 1 deny absolutely that I have received 
any message whatever from the president.' " 

Speaker Santon's sensational announce- 
ment from the floor of the Assembly a few 
days ago made a profound impression upon 
the great majority of the members of the 
lower house. That impression appears to 
have been suddenly removed. 

Speaker Stanton's masterly, dignified and 
statesmanlike altitude has undergone a re- 
markable change in the estimation of the 
public. In Sacramento, where there is more 



"war talk" than anywhere else in Califor- 
nia, the s 'taker's flat and unequivocal de- 
nial of Us own statement, in which he 
tacitly. ;\ ( 'J\-a>t. admitted having received an 
impi irtai ./dispatch from the president prior 
to the receipt of the telegram since made 
public, was almost the sole topic of conver- 
sation among the loungers in the betels and 
Other public places lasl week. It was face- 
tiously suggested b) some that Governor 
Gillett be called upon to appoint a special 
ci mmittee, consisting of Grove L. Johnson. 
Robert L. Beardslee, at least one geological 

expert and some world-wide authority on 
seismic disturbances, to make a careful in- 
vestigation of the geological formation be- 
neath the State Capitol and the contiguous 
territory in order to ascertain what caused 
the ground to cavort around in the fashion 
that led Speaker Stanton to suspect that it 
was "slipping from beneath my feet." 

"Sacramento, Feb. 10. — Theoodre Roose- 
vel. White House, Washington, D. C. I 
done it. (Signed). P. A. S." 

"White House, Washington, Feb. 10. — 
I seen you when you done it. Bully boy. 
(Signed). Big Stick." 

Seriously, and we have no desire to be 
regarded as wilfully offending the majesty 
of those in high authority in legislative of- 
fice in California, it seems pertinent to sug- 
gest that Speaker Stanton committed a 
grave tactical error, to say the least, when he 
made his buncombe speech. in which he de- 
scribed the sensation due to the slipping of 
the ground beneath his pedal extremities. 
It is a matter that may be treated lightly 
now, but we fear that in the future the in- 
cident may insist upon making Mr. Stan- 
ton "It" in the game of political tag — that, 
like the late lamented Mr. Banquo's ghost, 
it may protrude itself to the discomfiture 
of the speaker. 

♦ * * 

THE GAME 



GENERAL GEORGE Stone is one of the 
most conspicuous figures in the "regular 
organization" of the Republican party in 
California. He has' served as chairman of 
the Republican State Central Committee, 
as chairman of the campaign sub-committee, 
and as general pooh-bah for the "push" for 
many years. For some, time past he has 
been occupying the post of president of the 
Fish Commission of the State of California, 
serving, like the other two members of the 
commission, without salary. And thereby 
hangs a tale. 

There is an old saying that there comes 
a time in the lives of all men when oppor- 
tunity, if promptly grabbed by the forelock, 
leads on to fame and other desiderata. Such 
a time appears to have arrived in the life 
of one Harry Polsley, a quiet, retiring, mod- 
est, even bashful member of the State As- 
sembly from Red Bluff. 

Mr. Polslev is one of those conscientious 
men who like to see everything done on the 
square. He has a penchant for poking his 
nose into the state's business — an attribute 



which has been severely criticized by a cer- 
tain element in California which for 

has had things pretty nearly its own wa\ 
in politics. But rather than leading \h 
Polsley into trouble, tb disposition on his 
pan bids fair to lead u m to an eminence 
which will hold him Jbcurely before the 
eyi of a couple of minion people for some 
time to come. 

it all depends upon whether the Assembly 
is dominated by men or cowards. 

What did Mr. Polsley do, do you ask? 
Why, he just introduced a little resolution 
the other day — a request that the Legisla- 
ture name a committee of seven honorable 
gentlemen who would do a little investigat- 
ing into the work of the State Fish Com- 
mission, at the head of which is our estim- 
able and rather important fellow citizen, the 
distinguished General George Stone. 

The Polsley resolution recites that it is 
a matter of common report that the Fish 
Commission of California has been derelict 
in its official duties and wasteful of public 
moneys, that it has failed to obey the law 
directing that it make an annual report on 
or before September 15 of every other year, 
and that it has been otherwise disobedient 
and thoughtless. The special committee 
called for is asked to make a full and com- 
plete investigation into the affairs of the 
commission for the purpose of ascertaining 
what disposition has been made of its funds. 
and for the purpose of inquiring into the 
official work of the commission and its em- 
ployees and attaches. 

It is a matter of common report that the 
commission employs a large number of men, 
many of whom are detectives, and accord- 
ing to the accusations they are employed, 
to a large extent, for political purposes. 
Whether this charge is true or not will be 
determined by the inestigation demanded, 
provided it may not be smothered to death 
in the committee on fish and game to which 
it was referred. 

Unfortunately this committee is believed 
to be dominated by men who prefer to let 
General George Stone and his machine se- 
verely alone — so far as any inquiry into 
their political activities may be concerned. 
Assemblyman Leeds of Los Angeles, who is 
a member of the committee, declared on 
the floor of the Assembly a moment after 
the introduction of the Polsley resolution 
that the matter was one of grave importance 
and was deserving of careful and deliberate 
consideration. This is certainly a most 
commendable attitude for Mr. Leeds to as- 
sume, and the people of Los Angeles county 
who are interested in the preservation of 
game and the development of the fisheries 
of the state will be proud of him if he pre- 
vail upon his associates upon the committee 
on fish and game to go the limit in this 
investigation. 

Let us all hope that Mr. Leeds will keep 
a close eye upon the Fish Commission in 
order that it will not take the bait, hook, 
line and sinker attached to the Polsley reso- 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



lution and disappear from view far below 
the surface of the turbid political water for 
two years more. 

♦ * ♦, 

MORE WORK FOR THE LOBBY 



THE present Legislature is the nerviest 
in the history of California. Members of 
that body have dared to propose the im- 
peachment of all the members of tlC State 
Railroad Commission, and what is tanta- 
mount to an impeachment of the members 
of the State Fish Commission. 

Senator Caminetti, a Democrat, intro- 
duced a resolution Friday which was simi- 
lar in tone to, but went further than, the 
Campbell resolution charing neglect of duty. 
Ever since the Los 1 - Angeles Herald began 
its campaign agairi} 111 the Railroad Commis- 
sion, something lik'g'-sixteen months ago, to 
comoel that body to obey the plain and un- 
equivocal mandates of the Constitution, 
which has since been threshed out in the 
newspapers so- thoroughly that anything 
more than a passing reference to it on this 
occasion is unnecessary, there has been an 
increasing sentiment among the Democrats 
and the "insurgent" Republicans that dras- 
tic proceedings are necessary if the com- 
mission is to be anything more than an 
easily manipulated tool in the hands of the 
Southern Pacific railroad. 

The activities of the railroad lobby in Sac- 
ramento — J. C. Lynch, Jere Burke 
and Walter Parker — have been ex- 
tremely offensive to the dignity of the ma- 
jority of the Senate. Two years ago these 
notorious lobbyists were welcomed to the 
floors of both houses of the Legislature 
with open arms. The Senate includes this 
year, however, a vastly different type of 
men from those who have been influential in 
the deliberations of that body in the past. 
Some of these men are Democrats, some 
are Republicans — but, regardless of their 
political affiliations, they have brought the 
average of citizenship and statesmanship of 
the upper house to a high standard. It is 
safe to say that the California Senate as it 
stands today resents and will continue to 
resent dictation from the Southern Pacific 
railroad or any of the corrupting agencies 
it employs. 

In proof of this fact, it is only necessary 
to direct attention to two or three resolu- 
lutions recently introduced in that body. 
Senator Campbell, who already has become 
one of the most forceful figures in state af- 
fairs, although this is his first year in the 
Senate, proposed in one of his resolutions 
to bring the members of the State Rail- 
road Commission before the Senate commit- 
tee on corporations, there to explain many 
things which the shipping and importing 
interests of the state, the consumers and 
the legislators themselves, would like to 
know. Senator Campbell wants to know,, 
among other things, what official steps have 
been taken, if any, to remedy or prevent 
abuses, violation of the law, and discrimina- 
tions in rates ; what, if anything, has been 
attempted to be done concerning the recent 
raise in transcontinental freight rates ; what 
recommendations the commissioners have 
to offer on the legislation now pending in 
the Senate on the question of railroad regu- 
lation. 

Senator Campbell's resolution caused his 
fellow members in the Senate to sit erect, 
but it took Senator Caminetti's to get the 
entire Senate in touch with the active end 
of a real live wire. 

Senator Caminetti's resolution declared al- 



most in so many words that A. C. Irwin, H. 
D. Loveland and our own Theodore Sum- 
merland are little better than salary grab- 
bers. He charges all these members of the 
State Railroad Commission with gross neg- 
lect of the duties imposed upon them by 
the Constitution, and winds up by declar- 
ing the offices vacant. He says that for 
years the members of the commission have 
done practically nothing excent to carry out 
the wishes of the Southern Pacific railroad, 
that they have neglected to establish any 
rates, to examine the books of the transpor- 
tation companies, to enforce their decisions, 
to prevent discrimination, in short, to keep 
any check on the railroads what( e '-er. 

Senator Caminetti, not contentP'with de- 
manding that the railroad commissioners be 
impeached for derelictions of duty, has pro- 
posed another resolution providing that 
upon the petition of any citizen of the state, 
the commission must file a protest with the 
Interstate Commerce Commission regarding 
that portion of the recent raise in transpor- 
tation rates which may affect interstate busi- 
ness, and requiring- the attorney general to 
prosecute the proceedings. 

Does any one wonder that J. C. Lynch, 
Jere Burke and Walter Parker, the heavy 
"trip" of the notorious Southern Pacific 
lobby, have been grinding their shoe leather 
away on the marble floors at the state capi- 
tal? 

-J. .J. 4. 

BIG REFORM PROPOSED 



ONE of the worst features of the political 
campaign in this state in the past has been 
the flagrant abuses inflicted upon the tax- 
payers by certain county officials holding 
office under appointment, and employes and 
other attaches of county offices. 

Throughout the State of California, at 
every general election, many hundreds — 
yes, probably thousands — of the appointive 
officers and employes of the various coun- 
ties have neglected their sworn duties for 
periods ranging from one to four or five 
weeks before election, that they might ad- 
vance the interests of political candidates 
in favor with them. 

Los Angeles itself has not been free from 
this sort of political activity. At the last 
election it was notorious that ataches of the 
office of District Attorney Fredericks, in 
particular, were actively engaged in cam- 
paign work, during many days when their 
services should have been given to the state, 
upon whose time they were working. We 
have singled out the office of the district at- 
torney because of the particularly aggravat- 
ing conditions surrounding the work of that 
office during the campaign. And so with 
the coroner's office and on down the line. 
Probably no county office of any import- 
ance whatever would be found to be free 
from this charge were the truth known. 

To nrevent, if "nssible, a repetition of the 
conditions referred to, Senator Charles W. 
Bell of Pasadena has introduced a bill mak- 
ing it unlawful for any employe or official 
holding- place or office by appointment and 
not by election to participate in partisan 
politics or to take any active part in politics 
other than to exercise the right of suffrage. 
The penaltv imposed upon conviction is 
removal from office ; and the bill makes 
speedv and permanent removal easy. 

This is one of the most desirable pieces 
of legislation proposed at the present ses- 
sion of the Legislature. Senator .Bell has 
had splendid opportunities to observe the 



pernicious character of the political activi- 
ties engaged in by appointed officials during 
Campaigns, and the bill submitted by him 
covers the ground so fully that no question 
can be raised as to its worth. It certainly 
ought to become a law. Whether it shall 
or not will depend largely, perhaps, upon 
the encouragement the Legislature receives ' 
from outside sources. Public opinion will 
be potential in this as in other matters. If 
the people of California really want a bi'i 
of this kind to become a law, if they--really 
want their paid employes to attend to oublic 
business rather than to private politics, they 
should take the matter up by letter or other- 
wise with their various representatives, and 
urge upon the Legislature the necessity of 
supporting the Bell bill. 

Senator Bell is not suffering from the 
malady which seems to have infected many 
of his contemporaries in the Legislature, the 
malady which might be described as the 
"bill disease." Many members of the Leg- 
islature have introduced bills by the hun- 
dred, few of which are of any particular 
consequence. Senator Bell has introduced 
few bills, but all are worthy of profound 
consideration. If California had more sena- 
tors like him, the legislative files would not 
now be clogged up by something like twen- 
ty-seven hundred different measures, sev- 
enty-five per cent of which never should 
have been introduced. 



HARPER THE CONTEMPTIBLE 



A MONTH AGO the Pacific Outlook's 
attitude toward Arthur C. Harper was one 
of pity — pity because of the extreme depths 
of humiliation into which the individual had 
been plunged by reason of his own short- 
comings. But our pity has changed to con- 
tempt to a superlative degree. 

Three months ago this paper, which was 
the first publication to call attention to 
Mayor Harper's shortcomings, and the first 
and for many months the only one to warn 
him that he most certainly would be re- 
called and forever disgraced if he persisted 
in his follies, suggested that there yet re- 
mained one way out of the situation in 
which he found himself. Our advice to the 
mayor was that he not only repent but that' 
he at once make good in his repentance by 
leading a new political life. We held out to 
him the hope, amounting to a conviction, 
that if he would institute certain reforms in 
his administration, shaking off his self-con- 
stituted political advisors, ridding himself 
of his so-called "cabinet ;" if he would show 
the people of Los Angeles that he intended 
to give them what he promised to give them 
during the campaign which resulted in his. 
election, among other things refusing to ap- 
point to the board of public works the notor- 
ious Edward Kern, that he might rehabili- 
tate himself. 

Poor Harper ! Shortsighted, stupid, stub- 
born man ! Wrecked by his own supreme 
and inordinate vanity. He thought he could 
stem the tide of public disapproval. He 
thought the people of Los Angeles really 
wanted a "wide open" town. He thought 
so, why? Because of the fact that the only 
voices to which he would listen were those 
that spoke openly in advocacy of a degen- 
erate, immoral city. 

Poor Harper! He has been ruined by his 
false "friends." And after all, is he not yet, 
surrounded by the debris following a great 
outbreak of popular passion, more an object 
of pity than of wrath? 






PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



BOORISH 



IF a remark attributed to the United 

mento to • 

• iillett actually was made by the chief 

taken as additional evi- 

that he is a demagogue. Not onl) 

I will bring the 

n that the Governor looks upon the 

members of the Good Roads Association n- 

a lot of grafters trying to get their hands 

on a hi-,' r.>n of the state's money. This is 

what t Iillett is reported by this reliable news 

j as having said : 

not care what Daggett "r J. W. Eddy of 

r any 
others of the Good Roads Association, attempt 

in the way of blocking my good road- measure. 

• • In my opinion the attitude of the Good 

Association i- dictated solely by a desire 

to handle tin- $18,000,000. I am determined to 

have this money, it it i- voted by the people of 

California, handled under the direction ol" tile 
State Engineering Bureau, ol which Nat Ellery 

i- the head and of which I am a member. I 
regard this commission as not only honest, but 
competent. * * * The people of California 
are not crying for any frock-coated, patent-leath- 
ered commission to run around this state looking 
wise and telling us how we shall spend our 
money. 

The Governor of California lias gone out 
of his way to offer an insult to two of the 
must highly respected citizens of the state 
ami the Good Roads Association. If he 
used the words attributed to him (and he 
doubtless did. for the United Press is a 
thoroughly reliable agency for the collection 
and dissemination of news), he has placed 
himself in the category of cads. Inferen- 
tially he accuses the leaders of the Good 
Roads Association of blocking the passage 
of his pet state highway bill in order that 
they might "handle" the millions proposed 
to be appropriated. In the same breath he 
emphasizes the honesty and competency of 
the commission of which he himself is a 
member. 

The attitude of Governor Gillett on this 
matter is one deserving of popular con- 
tempt. In a pet he has exhibited a charac- 
teristic that does not attach itself to gen- 
tlemen of breeding — he atempts to bring into 
ridicule some of the most public-spirited 
and unselfish men in California by decrying 
them as "frock-coated" and "patent-leath- 
ered." 

Somebody should take James N. Gillett 
into a private corner and read him a few 
lessons in ordinary courtesy. The possess- 
ion of this quality is the least that the peo- 
ple of a great state should expect of their 
chief executive. 

* + ♦ 

Classical Names 

As for classical names, they are a peren- 
nial stumbling block to the bluejacket. No 
sooner has he learned how to pronounce 
the name Pactolus, for example, than he is 
required to give an entirely different into- 
nation to the name Eolus. He is not, how- 
ever, in these days always devoid of some 
slight, however delusive, classical inkling. 
Not many years ago a naval chaplain was 
asked by a bluejacket how to pronounce the 
name Andromache. "We have got a bet 
on it," he said, "on the lower deck. Is it 
Andrew Mash or Andrew Mack?" The 
chaplain gave him the correct intonation. 
"Well," he replied, "I wasn't quite right, 
but I was nearer right than the other fel- 
lows, for I've always heard that the Chi in 
Greek was hard and not soft." Neverthe- 
less Andrew Mack held the field until the 
ship went to the scrap heap, and the Terpsi- 
chore is still the Terpiscore. — London 
Times. 



CHILE CON CARNE 



BV At rOCBNESIS 

G. B. S. Dines.— As all the world know-, 

Mr. George Bernard Shaw i- a vegetarian, 

and to illustrate how completely he has 

1 himself above the material thing- ol 

this world, an amusing little Stor) ha- been 

told. At a certain Socialist conference the 

llbled after lunch, and "( .. 1 1 

v " came in rubbing his hands apparently 

on the best of terms with himself and the 

world in general, 'dad l<> see him looking 

ased, someone asked him what he had 

had for dinner. "Ah!" replied Air. Shaw. 

smiling genially : "a realK good dinner. I've 
had seven bananas !" 



If He Had Known. — It may surprise many 
people i" know that "G. B. S." has not al- 
wa-s been the successful man that he is to- 
day, and time was when he found editors 
and theatrical managers by no means over- 
anxious to give his creations to the world. 
In these early days he used to write a musi- 
cal criticism for a certain journal, and his 
strong views once induced a fellow writer 
to express his surprise that "G. B. S." should 
allow himself to be so emphastic. "My deai 
fellow," replied Mr. Shaw, quietly, "if you 
only knew what I thought and do not write, 
you would be surprised indeed." 



Artistic Temperament. — "My nerves are 
worn to shreds and tatters," wails one ma- 
tron, "and my temper is becoming so unre- 
liable that I shall probably soon not have a 
friend left. My only hope, so far as I can 
see, is to take to writing- poetry or brushing 
up on my music, so that I can make people 
believe my irritability is due to an artistic 
temperament. It's not the fashion in these 
days even to think of giving- up one's little 
weaknesses, pet vices or follies; you just 
give them a finely sounding name and let 
them flourish. The snappish declare them- 
selves to be 'highly strung,' the stingy are 
self-labeled 'prudent and economical,' and 
the passionate and quarrelsome take to 
themselves credit for being 'high spirited.' 
But the artistic temperament will serve my 
turn, for I've observed that you can claim 
unlimited indulgence from the world in gen- 
eral if you have that to back you." — Ex- 
change. 



Camels Are Coming. — Camel steaks and 
roast camel are new dishes in Paris which 
have become popular because they were 
served at several dinners recently where 
novelties are usually introduced. People 
who saw two ships of the desert decorated 
with ribbons in front of a butcher's shop in 
Paris naturally asked questions and only 
those who had heard of the new fad were 
not surprised to learn that they were, as the 
placard on one of the animals stated : "For 
slaughter. Orders for prompt delivery taken 
here." It was at one of these novelty din- 
ners in Paris that Welsh rabbits, the real 
cheese kinds, were served as a substitute for 
the game course. 



Barbaric Vanity. — "A picture recently 
published in Munich shows that the peculiar 
vanity which manifests itself in a desire to 
he photographed often kills the sense of de- 
cency," says a writer in a Berlin paper. 
"The picture shows five uniformed men 
standing on the smoking ruins of a build- 
ing. In front of them, propped up against 



the debris, are eight mutilated COrp 

der the picture is this legend: 'The Indian 

has been infested [or hundreds of - 
by Malaga pirates. Recently a body ol 
ropeans, conducted by natives, pursued and 

captured one of these robber bands, whom 
thej bound ami cast into a pagoda, which 
they then blew up with dynamite.' The 
men who |" ed lor a picture, in which they 

seemed to gloal '\ er the deed, thi 

which forms the grew some foreground, were 

all Europeans." 



Better Than a Wife. — Adolph Melzer, a 
soap manufacturer of Evansville, hid., and 

said to be a millionaire, has inserted an "ad" 
in the local papers reading as follows: "Dur- 
ing the month of February every person who 
has not the means to provide sufficient Feed 
for his horse or mule can obtain feed from 
me free of cost. All persons must bring 
recommendations from some well known 
citizen." Melzer is a lover of animals, and 
during the holidays fed hundreds of horses 
belonging to the needy. "I am a bachelor 
and have no wife to make my home cheery," 
he explained. "But I have dogs in my house 
and horses in my stable, and they take the 
place of a wife." 



An Access of Decency. — The board of cen- 
sors at Stuttgart, Germany, would not per- 
mit the performance in that city recently of 
Borngraeber's drama entitled "The First 
Man and Woman." A Stuttgart paper says: 
"This play is simple and pure, with its Para- 
dise setting, and not a work on which the 
pious anger of the censor should have been 
poured out." In the same city the owner of 
a hall refused to let it to Gabrielle Reuter, 
who wished to read there from her novel, 
"The House of Tears." The same paper 
says that the German people are awakening 
to the fact that all things that are written 
are not worthy of production. At Bromberg 
the public sense of decency was shocked by 
the vending of postcards bearing a reproduc- 
tion of Josef Limborg's "Lorelei." The 
cards were confiscated and destroyed. 



Advice from New York — "My dear, you 
must cultivate whatever talent you have for 
irrelevant conversation if you are to be a. 
success," said a recognized authority on so- 
cial matters to one of the season's debu- 
tantes. "Volubility is one of woman's most 
useful possessions. Don't ever make the 
mistake of thinking- that when you talk you 
must add intelligence to the general babble. 
This is what produces conversational bores. 
If you can't be brilliant or clever every one 
will be quite as well pleased if you are frank- 
ly and cheerily commonplace. The reason 
that married women are so popular is that 
they are generallv delightfully inconsequent 
talkers. Thev have passed the critical peri- 
od in life at which education may be of some 
importance. The nonsense of intellectual 
superiority vanishes with the possession of 
a motor car, and the mere existence of a 
husband is sufficient to remove any respon- 
sibility as regards the serious affairs of the 
world. While the art of irrelevant conversa- 
tion comes naturally after marriage I be- 
lieve it might be taught before, and I intend 
to do all I can to bring about that desirable 
end. I shall be glad to give you or any of 
my young friends my gravest counsels on 
the subject at any time." 



The Poet Laureate and Suffrage. — Among 
the latest opponents of the female suffrage 
movement is Mr. Alfred Austin, the 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



laureate, who has been writing to the press 
in vigorous terms against the granting of 
votes to women. Mr. Austin seems to fear 
that woman's impulsive nature might lead 
her, should she become enfranchised, to in- 
volve England in a terrible war, and then 
stand aside calmly while the men did the 
deadly work. Like a true poet, Mr. Austin 
dreads to see the 'day when women shall 
have lost her feminine charm, and shall have 
developed masculine qualities which would 
make her an impossible figure in a dainty 
verse on love. "In Dante's day," said Mr. 
Austin, in a lecture he once gave before the 
Dante Society of London. "Florentine wo- 
men left their mirrors without adding any 
any coloring to their cheeks, mothers tended 
their cradles, matrons and maids worked at 
their distaffs. You will probably think this 
is not very poetic ; if so, I venture to reply 
that it seems to me that it is. The really 
poetic conception of woman must include 
her dedication — 1 do not say her entire dedi- 
cation — to domestic duties." 

Absent-minded. — M. Rostand is rather ab- 
sent-minded, and an amusing story is told 
in this connection. One day, the dramatist 
went into a barber's shop to be shaved, and 
in the midst of the operation he was suden- 
ly seized with an inspiration, and snatched 
up a piece of paper on the marble slab be- 
fore him, and began to write. "Excuse me, 
monsieur," said the barber, "but I am very 
pressed for time." "Are you? Then so am 
I !" exclaimed Rostand, and out he went 
with his shave unfinished. Presently the 
whole shop was turned upside down to find 
the list of celebrated customers upon whom 
the barber and his assistants were to call'. 
But it was not to be found, for Rostand had 
taken it away with him, with an unfinished 
masterpiece on the back. Figaro jumped 
into a cab as soon as he realized this, and 
drove to the poet's Paris house, but the 
great man was out, and, although, the un- 
fortunate hairdresser remembered a few of 
the customers with whom he had appoint- 
ments, he could not be certain of at least 
ten. When the smart ladies who waited in 
vain to have their coiffures dressed heard 
the truth of the matter, they one and all 
vowed vengeance on the unconscious Ro- 
stand, for, they said, although he may have 
acted in the interests of art, what is art com- 
pared with a beautiful toilette? 



Tea Cigarettes. — The tea cigarette is the 
latest dissipation of the Parisienne who 
likes to play at smoking. It is said to be 
infinitely worse for the nerves than the ciga- 
rette made of tobacco. The tea cigarette 
contains tannin in its strongest form — 
enough in one small cigarette to make two 
strong cups of tea. A woman who smokes 
ten of these dainty trifles in a day — and 
many a woman gets through more than that 
in the seclusion of her boudoir — therefore 
has taken the equivalent of twenty large 
cups of tea. It is an easy method of stimula- 
tion. My lady comes in from a round of 
calls, tired and fagged.; a few puffs at her 
tiny tea cigarette, and her nerves are strung 
up for the dinner or reception that is to fol- 
low. In fact, it is a horrible easy method of 
stimulation.' 



A Moving Scene. — Mr. Forbes Robertson 
was once playing with Mme. Modjeska in 
Romeo and Juliet, and one evening had an 
awkward contretemps in the "tomb" scene. 
The "tomb" was built on steps. He as- 
cended, sat down on the tomb, and went on 



to apostrophise the dead Juliet, when, to 
his horror, the steps, which were on rollers 
to facilitate moving the erection, began to 
move towards the footlights, Mr. Robert- 
son gave a horrified exclamation under his 
breath, to which Modjeska responded under 
her veil, "Vat has happened?" "The steps 
have rolled away," the actor gasped. "You 
vill have to jump," she returned calmly; and 
jump he did. 

* * * 

True Deduction 

Wife — I had in my mind to ask you for 
a new gown, dear, but I see you can't afford 
it. 

Husband — How did you discover that, my 
love ? 

Wife — Why, I peeped into your check 
book this morning and saw you had only 
one check left ! 

* * * 

Reproducing Sound Records by Air 

The methods for recording sound have 
reached a higher state of perfection than 
those employed for its reproduction. The 
chief difficulty encountered in the present 
systems of reproducing conversation and 
especially music, from phonographic and 
similar records, is caused by the friction of 
the needle resting upon the surface of the 
rapidly revolving disk or cylinder. This in- 
troduces a more or less noticeable buzzing 
or rumbling sound, which interferes mater- 
ially with the clearness of musical notes or 
spoken words. Numerous attempts have 
been made to overcome this unpleasant ac- 
companiment. In none of the devices 
hitherto brougLt forward has complete suc- 
cess been attained, since all involved the 
factor of friction as the fundamental means 
of transmission : 

In a recent unmber of the Deutsche Mu- 
sikwerk-Industrie, says a consular report 
from Chemnitz, Germany, a German in- 
ventor describs a newly patented instrument 
in which friction is completely avoided. It 
combines the leading elements of the pho- 
nograph and the siren. The novel and es- 
sential feature is the substitution of a cur- 
rent of compressed air for the needle or 
stylus of Edison's invention. 

In a siren openings of various sizes allow 
the production of all musical notes with any 
desired degree of intensity or length. In the 
new instrument perforations in the disk of 
a siren are replaced by tangential incisions 
on the surface of a large record cylinder. A 
second perfectly smooth cylinder rests close 
upon the surface of the first cylinder and 
revolves in unison with it as the two cylin- 
ders are set in movement. A constantly 
varying succession of minute openings be- 
tween their surfaces is presented, due to the 
incisions on the record cylinder. When a 
powerful blast of compressed air is directed 
upon the line of contact between the two 
cylinders, at such an angle as to be an exact 
tangent to the surface of both, sounds are. 
evoked identically as in the case of an or- 
dinary siren. It is possible to communicate 
signals and even words which can be readily 
heard miles away. 

It is already evident that a field for use- 
fulness is open to this new invention as an 
adjunct to th equipment of seagoing vessels. 
Its availability for musical purposes has not 
yet been tested sufficiently to determine 
whether it can successfully vie with the 
gramophone, phonograph, etc., or even re- 
place them. 

The cylinders thus far employed are about 
ten times as large as ordinary phonographic 



cylinders, and this fact renders the instru- 
ment necessarily clumsy. The requirement 
of a current of compressed air may also 
militate against a widespread domestic use, 
although such a current can be supplied by 
a comparatively inexpensive attachment to 
a watr tap where the water supply is under 
considerable pressure. 

* * * 
Tit-bits of Science 

A big coal mine in Pennsylvania which 
is operated throughout by electricity has 
proved that the power may be generated 
and applied in such a complex operation at 
about one-third the cost of steam. 

By the adding of 20 per cent of thorium 
oxide to tungsten, it is claimed that the re- 
sistance of electric light filaments are in- 
creased 50 ,per cent, permitting the use of 
shorter filaments. 

Tests of man-lifting kites in the British 
Navy have shown that from heights of from 
2000 to 3000 feet shoals, sunken wrecks, sub- 
marines and submerged mines are clearly 
discernible. , 

The first piano factory in the Australian 
State of Victoria is in course of construction 
at Melbourne. 

Silverware may be kept bright by. leaving 
it for several hours in a hot solution of 
borax. 

Plans of the Navy Department include so 
complete a chain of wireless stations on the 
nation's foreign possessions that war ships 
may be reached from Washington anywhere 
in the world. 

Sweden's royal forestry commission last 
year supplied forest products worth $13,- 
250,000, yet accumulated timber resources 
equal to twice the amount of the timber 
felled. 

But three States produced quicksilver last 
year — California, Texas and Utah, the first 
named about 80 per cent of the total. 



^E-J^ 



ScBkoaoway < ^^fe^^ i ' So.Hm. Siraei 
A. FUSENTOT CO. 

New Wash Goods 



/j& UR assortment of Spring tub fabrics 
^-" is unsurpassed in the city in points of 

Beauty 

Newness 

Extensiveness 

A special feature of the new line is the 
showing of 

BELGIAN HOP SACKING 

All pure linen, 46 in. wide, at $1.00 yard. 

This fabric is the latest New York craze 
for the construction of long coat suits that 
launder. The material is coarse and heavy 
but has a rich and lustrous finish. The 
colors are ultra fashionable and include: 
Beige, Cuir, Lilac, Ceil Delft, Vieux Rose, 
etc. 

Ask to see them. 






PACIFIC OUTLOOK 




On the Shores of Avalon 



By Marie J. Bresee 




Even 
• cnth 
iled Ihe calm waters which 
he named "Pacific", did not 

cent to that pan 
mown 



dent I) 

-rking 
implements, discovered in di 
about the is round i" 

lloni shell. Many ol 

ornament havi 
found in different part* of the island 
and tome arc at present in Eastern 
museums, 
i Ine of the prehisti nents 




***>fc^ 



Lovely 

as Southern California. It remained 
for Cabrillo, who in 1542 was cruising 
in this vicinity, to find shelter in the 

crescent harbor of Avalon, which at 
■that time was a good sized Indian 
village. 

The beauty of the island and its 
land locked -harbor must have at- 
tracted other navigators of the Pa- 
cific, but we hear very little of it until 
the 17th century, when Philip III. of 
Spain ordered an expedition to the 
Pacific, which expedition sailed under 
Vizcaino. In his cruising he came 
upon this beautiful island and he 
called it Santa Catalina. He' found it 
inhabited by a fine looking race of 
natives who were superior in the rude 
■arts; it is supposed that later they 
gradually became absorbed into the 
mainland missions of Los Angeles 
and Santa Barbara Counties, as when 



AVAION 

was at Isthmus Cove, where formerly 
"existed an old graveyard. From the 
abalone shells found near here and 
from the graves, have been obtained 
many strings of shell beads, so popu- 
lar with the tourist. In fact, the graves 
have yielded all the history of those 
early days. To the explorer and 
searcher for things of historical in- 
terest, there are yet, many places on 
the island, where he may delve for 
"dim relics of a tragic past"; and the 
visitor, as he strolls through the can- 
yons or over the mountains, must find 
added interest ill knowing that every 
spot has its history. 

One point of great interest is the 
old manufactory where the stone jars 
(ollas) were cut by the natives with 
their quartz chisels. These jars are 
beautifully shaped and from the num- 
ber that were found unfinished it is 




The Golf Links, Avalon 



next we hear of the Catalinians, they 
are much reduced in numbers. 

The island must have offered 
thorough all these years the same 
inducements as to scenery, climate 
and vegetation as it does today, but of 
the early peoples, there remains only 
the atmosphere of mystery and rom- 
ance. The ancient Catalinians. previ- 
ous to the coming of Cabrillo, evi- 



supposed that they were made in 
great quantities and it is a matter of 
speculation why the natives did not 
return to finish the work. 

The trip to Santa Catalina is a de- 
lightful one of fifty miles from Los 
Angeles. The Pacific Electric carries 
us out of the "busy haunts of men", 
through the green country fields, with 
the distant foothills and mountains, 



on to the i dro, w here 

more than 360 I abrillo 

came to anchor. The harbor, which 

today is tilled witil vessels ol 
merce and with steamers from many 
ports was at that time, the home of 

the Indian, l'.ut now as we pass 

through the line 

breakwater, there are no Indians with 

tomahawk or arrow. We may look 
undisturbed at the cities ot Long 
Beach and Newport on one hand, and 
on the other the silver sands of Santa 

Monica and Red I' i, .i ■ we move out 

of the harbor and into the blue v 
of the Pacific. To many the delight- 
ful ocean ride is the main feature of 
the trip. The sky is clear, the water 
the bluest imaginable, and the sea 
gulls, circling aiboul the steamer, are 
with us all the way. The air is fresh 
and bracing, and even the mast head 
describing queer angles and lines 
against the sky as one looks at it, 



tlu beauty of the crescent 
shaped harbor we are entering, \\ lure 

hundi. is ago, I 

brillo and \ :u In- 

dian village. I da) we find a thriv- 
itj of Shops, hotels and ho 

Vvalon i- less than fifty years old. 
word literally in. in- "Island of 
Apples", bin in Celtic mytholo 
mi hi- "Land of the Blessed", w hicli 
name best fits it today. The plants 
.nid flowers "f every zone meet here 
on common ground, and the seeker 
for climate finds every condition. 
The lover of Nature finds all the 
-' ' nery that mountain, ocean, sky 
and trees can give. The student of 
marine life finds opportunity for 
study in the Aquarium where are shown 
the living plants and fishes of Ava- 
lon Bay. The botanist finds joy in 
four hundred different plants for 
study. The sportsman delights in the 
quantities of quail and other game 




Catalina is the Fisherman's Paradise 



only adds zest to the pleasure of a 
good sailor. The leaping and flying 
fish, which move faster than the boat 
and in leaping come wholly out of 
the water, are a very interesting fea- 
ture to one to whom the sight is new. 
Catalina is visible for some time 
before we reach it, — at first looking 
like a cloud, later taking on shape and 
form, and finally we see a mountain- 
ous island, twenty miles long, stand- 
ing out in the blue waters of the Pa- 
cific. We see the canyons with their 
slopes of green, the cliffs rising like 
giants in the air, and at their base a 
city, which "Like Naples, sitteth by 
the sea, keystone of an arch of 
azure." As we near the wharf, some 
lads swim out to meet the boat and 
they clamor loudly for coins to be 
thrown them, for which they dive. 
They are as amphibious as the seals, 
and will dive as often as a piece of 
silver is thrown, which they readily 
see and come to the surface with the 
coin in the month. The passengers 
are so entertained with this aquatic 
performance, that they have nearly 



found in the uplands, and the fisher- 
man finds it an ideal place for his 
sport. Indeed, one never heard such 
tremendous fi.sh stories in his life, and 
they are exceptional, too, in that the 
biggest fish do not get away, but are 
always caught. 

The principal street is Crescent ave- 
nue, which is lined with hotels and 
shops. Near sentinel rock, called 
Sugar Loaf, which stands on one side 
of the entrance to the harbor, runs a 
road to the summer home of Hancock 
Banning, one of the proprietors of 
the island, and also one of the pro- 
prietors of the Wilmington Trans- 
portation Co., which has done every- 
thing to make the island the desirable 
resort and sanatorium it is. 

The greatest attraction to the visi- 
tor is the submarine gardens. The 
waters around Santa Catalina are so 
clear that one can see to a depth of 
forty or fifty feet. Glass bottomed 
boats have been provided in which one 
can drift about and gaze into the 
depths. This is a novel and interesting 
ride .mil gives some idea of what the 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



greater depths must contain. We see 
plants, flowers, and miniature forests; 
great rocks, which form ravines; 
hills sloping off to smooth shining 
sand; great shells sparkling in the 
sunlight which gleams through the 
foliage. In the clefts and crannies of 
the rocks we see fine sea weed of red 
and other varieties; real trees, that 
wave and bend with the motion of the 
water; waving beds of kelp and all 
colors of marine shrubbery. We see 
beautiful gold fish, made more bril- 
liant with the sunlight upon them, 
swimming idly among the trees and 
.rocks; greenish-hued kelp fish; blue 



of riding in a stage coach drawn by 
six horses, handled by a driver who 
knows how to drive, and over roads 
that are perfectly safe, and offering 
continuous moving pictures of green 
slope, deep canyons, beautiful bays, 
snow-capped mountains, and count- 
less miles of ocean. 

The coach starts from Crescent ave- 
nue, and leading off in a northwester- 
ly direction, crosses one of the many 
canyons that lead to the sea. Then 
turning to the east, we see below us 
the little town and the crescent bay 
we have left only a few moments be- 
fore. Suddenly the road turns to the 




Coaching on Santa Catawna 



fish; sea bass; yellow tails, all adding 
to the pleasure and interest of the 
spectator. The variety of fish is re- 
markable. 

Sticking from the rocks we see the 
whips of the craw fish and sprawling 
on the algae covered rocks is the sea 
cucumber, the lowest specimen of ani- 
mal life. In the shallower water the 
rocks are covered with the sea 
anemones of varied hue, the nearest 
approach to coral found in these 
waters. The star fish is seen in the 
shadow of the rocks, and in this nat- 
ural aquarium, more interesting than 
any formed by man, are many varie- 



west and we go up and up over 
smooth well kept roads, which at 
times form merely a shelf on the 
mountain side. From every turn of 
the road a new and wonderful view 
presents itself. Looking away to the 
southwest, across the beautiful blue 
of the Pacific, we see the snow 
crowned peaks of San Bernardino and 
San Jacinto, and the distant peaks of 
the Sierra Madres "whose sun bright 
summits mingle with the skies". 

As we make another turn, sharp but 
well protected, we look down into a 
deep canyon, or out upon the golf 
links of the Santa Catalina Golf Club. 




ties of shells. A passenger may select 
any one his fancy dictates, and a lad 
furnishes entertainment by diving for 
it. This trip has to be made to be 
appreciated; attempt at description is 
like "painting the lily or gilding re- 
fined gold." 

No visitor should miss a drive on 
the island. Travelers from all parts 
of the world agree that the drives on 
Catalina are equal, if not superior, to 
any in the world. One has the novelty 



Landing on Catamna Isiand 

We finally reach the summit and out 
upon the level ground over 2000 feet 
above Avalon. From this point can 
be seen the peak of Black Jack, sep- 
arated from Mt. Orizaba by a great 
canyon. It is winter, but the skies 
are blue, — the hills are green, — the air 
is fragrant with flowers. It is a pic- 
ture one hangs on the walls of mem- 
ory to leave there. From this point 
the road winds down Middle Ranch; 
this canyon seems to cut the island in 



two, and a little stream flows musical- 
ly beneath the trees and there are 
flowers and cacti to adorn the siopcs. 
One can continue his ride for miles, 
but the visitor of a day must be con- 
tent with the drive to the summit, 
and we are back at our starting place 
after a very exciting ride down- the 
last descent. 

Other interesting points reached by 
driving, or by walking if one is a good 
pedestrian, are the Sea Lion Rockery 
where one may see the seals playing 
upon the rocks and in the water; the 
prehistoric caves thirteen miles away; 
the quarries twelve miles distant; 
Moonstone Beach, where the delicate 
moonstones are gathered. In fact, the 
whole island is full of beauty and in- 



terest and one could spend many days 
in this delightful spot. But if one has 
only one day, he may have the ocean 
trip, the mountain drive and the visit 
to the marine gardens, which is sure- 
ly enough of grandeur and beauty for 
one day. 



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PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



How Washington is Realized 
in Schools Today 



By Mahik 
r the 

it a 

and it 
11 the old 

'il a new way In -l 
graphical statistic: 
nicd by a lung li-t of h 
virtues, we heard of the human 
of the father of our country, and 
.1 that he was a very human in- 
ual indeed, though none tin 

children we had known him only 

- stern man, "too good for 

human nature's daily food". His pic 

lure hung on our library wall an 

which followed one ahoul 

room, were positively terrifying it" we 

had done anything wrong. His heroic 

made little impi ion us 

ery one was traced so directly to 

imous occasion upon which he 

ed to tell a lie, a story we heard 

ften, that we failed to appreciate 

the moral value attached to the truth. 

So it was really delightful to hear 
youth of this day talk of him as 
Unary boy, with a very ordinary 
chidlhood and a hoy who might have 
attended school with themselves. We 
recall how laboriously we studied to 
recite that Washington's mind was 
powerful though slow in operation, 
use he lacked invention, or words 
to that effect. How much more simple 
and refreshing to hear a sturdy twelve 
year old lad say that Washington had 
a good mind but did not like to study 
if he could get out of it; in fact, he 
did not like school any more than we 
do. But as if to make amends for this 
lack in a hero, he added that Wash- 
ington was always sorry that he had 
not applied himself harder to spelling 
and writing. 

His diligence and hard work during 
his occupancy of the office of Public 
Surveyor, which position he held at 
the age of sixteen, was toid in the 
emphatic statement that when Wash- 
ington began anything, he stuck right 
to it, and worked hard. He was made 
Adjutant General at the age of nine- 
teen, and while he proved himself a 
forceful and competent young man, 
he was by no means a saint. 

Why is it that the ordinary boy 
docs not like saints? He likes heroes, 
but they must be human heroes, with 
human characteristics. It really made 
the hero and patriot more real to 
them to know- that Washington was 
nol always a soldier and statesman, 
but had been a boy like themselves, 
and an obstinate boy too, as one lad 
reported and much fonder of giving 
advice than taking it. This state- 
ment was followed by another to the 
effect that when Washington did any- 
thing great, he wanted everybody to 



.1 ItRI 

at thai he 
.1 mortal i 

I think that a knowl- 

mall faults would de- 

rd "i the soldier 

and ; .it, Everj 

meni mother of some 

commendable characteristic su< 

ceil and all forms of 
nesty; his entire freedom from 
all forms of bad habits; hi> sense of 
honor in never promising more than 
uld perform and his own asser 
tion that good sense and honest) are 
precious qualities. 

From the time he went on his 
famous mis-ion to warn the intruding 
French at Fori Duquesne, and a year 
later "fired the shot heard round the 
world" he was soldier, patriot and 
to them,— the man who "did 
things" and they couldn't tell fast 
enough of his exploits and victories, 
not forgetting his universal kindness 
to high and low, and his absolute 
trust in God. Whether he cut down 
the cherry tree or not, seemed to be 
a matter of indifference to them, but 
they emphasized his love for the truth 
and his keen sense of honor, which 
was in fact, the foundation upon 
which he stood as soldier and citizen. 

Washington was not a man of many 
friendships. He himself said "Friend- 
ship is a plant of slow growth"; in 
the jealous strife which he had to 
meet as Executive of the nation, he 
found enough to prompt his remark 
that "Actions, not words arc the true 
criterion of friends." We know of 
many disappointments which came to 
him through the treacltery of men 
wdio professed friendship, and if the 
lad who told of the intrigues of Lee 
and Gates and of the treachery of 
Arnold, felt half the indignation his 
voice and manner expressed, the les- 
son had borne fruit in one case at 
least. 

We do not know just what experi- 
ence of Washington's prompted him 
to say that few men have virtue to 
withstand the highest bidder, but we 
see that human nature was much the 
same then as now. 

The details of Wasington's life as a 
statesman had to be briefly told as an 
afternoon is too short for all points 
in his biography. The lesson brought 
home to the hearts of the pupils was 
the honor and grandeur of a man wdio 
had been a boy like themselves; who 
had had youtful faults of obstinacy,, 
quick temper, and love of admiration, 
but who had been able to overcome 
them. "When the fight begins within 
himself, a man's worth something", 
and through this fight which was as 
hard as the fight with his outside 
foes, he developed patience, wisdom, 
tact, and put out of' himself all ma- 
terial ambition. He had through ap- 
plication of the rules of truth and 
honor, coupled with bravery, self sac- 
rificing patriotism and obedience, 



jo, i- worthy of 
emulation For 
"No lifi i hi be pure ill its purpo 

strong in it- strife. 
And all life nol be purer and *t; 
thereby " 

+ * ♦ 
A New View of the Recall 
There is no doubt that the preju- 
dice in certain quarters against the 
lied "recall" provision of the 
barter is due in part 
nee by its train- 
ers of that word "recall." As a mat- 
ter of fact the so-called recall is 
nothing other than an involuntary 
I to the people. The provision 
of our charter provides rather for an 
I by the occupant of an elec- 
tive office, to tin- people for a vote 
nfidence, than for the removal of 
an elective officers as the removal can 
he effected only in case of his failure 
to obtain such a vote. It is Only in 
order 'to save expense to the city in 
case of such failure by the officer to 
obtain an endorsement of his conduct 
and to preclude a vacancy in the of- 
fice, that the charter incorporates a 
provision for the submission at the 
same time to the people of candidates 
for a vacancy which may be created. 
Thus viewed the Recall is only in 
a limited sense an innovation, for in 
England for many years it has been 
an unwritten law of Parliament that, 
yielding to supposedly adverse pub- 
lic sentiment its members should ap- 
peal to their constituents for re-elec- 
tion. Theref.ore it will be seen that 
the only innovation in our charter 
from the point of view of political 
science is this: That under our char- 
ter the appeal is involuntary rather 
than voluntary, a difference due to the 
circumstance that the framers of our 
charter well knew that the represen- 
tatives of .the American people are 
less sensitive to public opinion than 
is the British Parliament. No doubt 
if the word "Recall," — .which inciden- 
tally is an improper use of the En- 
glish language, — could be replaced by 
the term "Appeal to the People," the 
feeling that the invocation of the re- 
call against an officer is an act of 
persecution would also be removed; 
for, if the people understand that the 
charter provision merely compelled 
the officer to obtain a vote of confi- 
dence from the people in order to 
retain his office, there would no longer 
be any occasion for public sympa- 
thy. HUGH W. ADAM'S. 



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PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



lapam 



By William Thum 



UNTIL most exhaustive proof to 
the contrary has been discov- 
ered, the fair-minded man who 
is informed of Japan's achievements 
must admit that the Japanese are as 
alert in most phases, if not in every 
phase, of mind as are the people of 
other nations. Their success in gov- 
ernment entitles the Japanese to 
credit for possessing patriotism to a 
degree equal at least to that of the 
people of most white nations. 

Many Californians, however, be- 
lieve that in the matter of interna- 
tional fellowship and what may be 
called international fellowship, higher 
mind states than even patriotism, Ja- 
pan is inferior to a few of the farthest 
advanced white nations. This inferi- 
ority, if it exists, is, in the belief of 
Californians, evidenced by the imper- 
fect aid rendered by Japan in pre- 
venting her less educated citizens 
from living in this country, and there- 
by causing serious industrial and ra- 
cial disturbances. These disturb- 
ances are an injury especially to the 
wage-earner and the small agricul- 
turist, the two most substantial ele- 
ments of the country's foundation. 

The fact that the American laborer 
in America receives better wages and 
has shorter hours than the Japanese 
laborer in Japan, indicates that the 
United States, taken as a whole, has 
developed to a higher sociologic 
plane than has Japan. Let us suppose 
that a highly patriotic country such 
as Norway had so far perfected its 
sociologic organism that its laborers 
were practically all well educated men 
earning an equivalent of say six dol- 
lars a day of six working hours each. 
Let us also suppose that American 
laborers suddenly became aware of the 
advanced economic state of Norway, 
and flocked there in large numbers 
with the eventual results of lowering 
wages, of increasing the hours of 
daily work, and of causing labor riots. 
Now let us suppose that the govern- 
ment of Norway should ask the aid 
of the United States government in 
checking this great influx of cheaper 
la>bor, to the end that Norway's so- 
ciologic progress be not retarded. 

We have a right to believe that our 
government and our people, impelled 
by the power of international fellow- 
ship, of which we possess perhaps as 
much as does any nation, would lend 
Norway every aid. This aid it is cer- 
tain would he rendered even if the 
Norwegians were of a different race. 
But Norway, whether it had a large 
or small army, whether it were su- 
perior or inferior in power to kill, 
would, if it needed aid, approach the 
United States government in a rea- 
sonable way, and the people of Nor- 
way, .believing in international cour- 
tesy, would, not offend the aliens from 
the United States. 

The United States did not exclude 
its workers and industrial captains 
from Cuba nor the Philippines, both 

i 



countries of less industrial and social 
development, nevertheless it exercised 
the highest form of international and 
inter-racial fellowship ever attempted 
in a large way by any nation. The 
attitude taken by the United States 
toward Cuba and the Philippines, and 
the ultimate results of this attitude 
will prove that international and inter- 
racial fellowship are not only possible 
but that they are advanced steps in 
civilization. 

Although we would give Norway 
every aid she could wish, Norway 
would neither wish nor need aid, As 
soon as it appeared that the influx of 
American laborers who had come to 
do all of Norway's so-called common 
work, was disturbing her internal 
peace and sociologic advance, a moral 
power from within the Norwegian 
would work the cure; Norway would 
need no exclusion law, and it would 
raise no international question, be- 
cause the people would be loyal to 
their highly developed institutions, 
and their sense of justice and fellow- 
ship would safeguard against riots. 
As soon as the "American Danger" 
had been officially recognized., the 
■rich man's family would, after giving 
fair notice, discharge any American 
domestic workers and housekeepers 
and it would do its own housework 
if no Norwegian servants could be 
secured. The rich family would do 
this even if removal to a cottage be- 
came necessary. All Norwegian em- 
ployers of American labor would give 
notice of discharge ranging in time 
from one to possibly five years, in 
isolated cases, even ten years. All 
land owners would refuse to rent ad- 
ditional land to American farmers, 
and those who were then holding land 
under lease would be told that leases 
would be renewed for a period rang- 
ing from three to five years only, as 
these owners would realize that the 
greatest harm can come to a nation 
through permitting the farm indus- 
tries to fall into foreign hands. In such 
a -way as to produce the least indus- 
trial disturbance, the well-inform- 
ed Norwegian laborers would make 
an organized and sane effort to bring 
about the change from American back 
to Norwegian labor. 

After a nation is so highly devel- 
oped as Norway is here pictured, it 
will be but a decade or two longer 
until the laborers themselves are the 
employers and land owners. When 
this time arrives industrial competi- 
tion will 'be replaced by a higher kind, 
and citizens of foreign races who have 
congenial social qualities and who 
have come to a certain community by 
reason of an irresistible attraction, 
will be welcomed wherever they wish 
to settle. National boundaries will 
then be of the nature of state and 
county lines. Racial distinction, when 
all have been well educated for but a 
few generations, will be merely a mat- 
ter of descriptive words, and finally 
it may even disappear. It is easy to 



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PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



il in 
high 

.ml in ail 

mcnt. I'ni- 

i recently intei 

■i thai 
infancy. Pi 
ire, »( can only blame 
presence of the Japa- 
i >ur mistake i- due simply I" 
nee, or to our indifference 
in regard to the results of 

having a "foreign race" in our midst 
at this It we 

were neither ignorant nor indifferent 
in the matter we would not attract 
those of a foreign race by employing 
them to do our common work, and 
■ ally our agricultural work. It 
remains to be seen whether or not 
patriotism and international and in- 
ter-racial fellowship are well enough 
developed in both nations to result 
in a determination to develop to a 
much higher plane independently of 
each other, excepting for the friend- 
ly interchange of ideas and other mu- 
tual helpfulness. Then there will fol- 
low a desire to mingle for social 
reasons, and no harm can result. 

There seems no good reason why 
we should wish to be less consider- 
ate of the Japanese laborers in Cali- 
fornia than are our partially imagin- 
ary Norwegians of the supposed 
American laborers in Norway. 

* + + 



FortHcoming Events 



Feb. 20 to Feb. 27 
Theatres Next Week 

Auditorium — "AH Baba". 

Belasc.o — "A Texas, Steer". 

Burbank — "A Temperance Town". 

Grand — "A Chinese Honeymoon". 

Majestic — ".Marrying Mary". 

-Mason — "Girls". 

Exhibitions 

Steckel's gallery, oil paintings, 
James E. McBurney; water colors, 
Margaret Jordan Patterson. 

Blanchard hall, work of women 
painters. 

10 a. m. to 5 p. m. Studio 2548 
W. Pico street, mural paintings, An- 
toon Molkenboer. 

Southwest Museum, 2 to 4 p.m., 
Hamburger building. 

Kanst gallery, water colors, Nor- 
man St. Clair. 

Meetings and Lectures 

Today (Saturday), Feb. 20, 6:32 a 
m.. sunrise. 

12 m. .Minnesota Gopher Club pic- 
nic. East Lake Park. 
12:15 p. m. City Club. 
12:30 p. m. Pacific Mutual Insur- 
ance luncheon, Hotel I.ankershim. 



- iapc- 

Club, 
nd No 1. \ 

intents in 1' ili 

111 llltl 

, -,...;. Polj leclinii . 

in Playground No. 3, Si John 
-trcct. musical; John I). Walker, ten- 
or; W. E Strowbridge, piano; Osmar 
\\ citi, violin. 

Sunday, Feb. 21 
1 p m. "Science of Christian 
Science". Ed. Adams Cantrell, Mam- 
moth Hall 

3 p. ni "Labrador", Dr. Grcnfcll, 
Temple Auditorium. 

3 p. in. "Socialism". J. 1'.. i Isbi 
iik Hall. 

8 p. m. "Socialism", J. B. I Isborne, 
Howell Hall. 

8 p. m. "Suicide". Grant R. Ben- 
nett, Mammoth hall. 

8 p. m. Song recital. Miss Coleman, 
I Intel Green. Pasadena. 

8:15 p. m. "London", li. R. Baiun- 
gardt, Symphony hall, 

Monday, Feb. 22 — Washington's 
Birthday 

10:30 a. m. "Corneille", Prof. H. 
Alliot. Ruskin Art rooms. 

12 m. Iowa Association picnic, Ag- 
ricultural Park. 

2:30 p. in. Patriotic music, Mrs. 
Marion Walsh, Ebell Club. 

2:30 p. m. Tract events, Polytccnie 
and L. A. H., U. S. C. grounds. 

6:30 p. m. Orchestra rehearsal, Y. 
M. C. A., Hope street. 

6:30 p. m. Annual banquet Chamber 
of Commerce, Levy's Cafe. 

S p. m. Meeting to form Tuberculo- 
sis organization, Shakespeare Club 
1 1, luse, Pasadena. 

8 p. m. Glee Club rehearsal, Y, M. 
C A., Hope street. 

Tuesday, Feb. 23 

9:30 a. m. Board of Supervisors. 

10 a. m. "Books and Conversation", 
Mrs. Hood, Highland Park Ebell, Ma- 
sonic hall. 

10:30 a. m. Arbor Day association, 
Chamber of Commerce. 

2 p. m. Woman's Lyric Club re- 
hearsal, Symphony hall. 

2:30 p. ni. Police Commission. 

3 p. m. Colonial Day, Friday Morn-, 
ing Club. 

3 p. m. Womany's Orchestra re- 
hearsal. 

3 p. m. "History of Southern Cali- 
fornia", Mrs. Helen Bandini, Shake- 
speare Club House, Pasadena. 

4:30 p. m. Civil Service Commis- 
sion. 

6:30 p. m. Mandolin Club rehearsal, 
Y. M. C. A.. Hope street. 

8 p. m. Woman's Socialist Union. 
"Economic Changes", Mary E. Gar- 
butt and Mr. Shropshire, Howell hall. 

8 p. m. Orpheus Club rehearsal, 
Gamut Club. 

8 p. m. Ellis Club rehearsal. Sym- 
phony Hall. 

8 p. m. Twilight Club, Shakespeare 
Club House. Pasadena 

8:30 p. m. Violin recital. O. Seiling. 
Blanchard Hall. 



Wednesday, Feb. 24 — Ash Wednesday 

10 a in Mrs. 
Nethery and Mrs. Vcrmilyca, Ruskin 

lull. 
10:30 a. in. "The Play and the Vu 
dience", Mr- Eugene T. Pettigrew, 
illustrations by Mr-. Millard, 
Swaine and Mrs. Burkhardt-Goldsmith, 

10:30 a, m. Park ' ommission, 

11 a. m. Playground Commission, 
City Hall. 

3 p. in. Board of directors, Chamber 
of Commerce. 

3 p. in. Music section. Shake 
Club. Pasadena. 

7 p in. trustees, Holly- 
>\ l 

Song recital. Mi- DrCyfUS, San 

Bernardino 

8 p. m. Miu-lrcls. V. M. C. A., 

treel 

Thursday, Feb. 25 

10:30 a. in. Fire Commission. 

7:3!) p. m. "Egypt", lecture in Rus- 
sian. Mr. Schcrbach. 

8 p. m. "Scientific Salesmanship", 
F. J. Raymond, Mammoth hall. 

8 p. m. Minstrels, V, M. C. A.. Hope 
street. 

8 p. m Poultry Breekers of South- 
ern (California, Chamber of Commerce. 

8 p. m. Pupils' recital. Miss Hall, 
Shakespeare Club, Pasadena. 



Friday, Feb. 26 
1(1 a m. Supply Committi 
11 a m. "Labrador", Dr. Grenfell, 
i iccidental I olli 

J p. in. Hoard of Public Works, 
1 p. in "Psychotherapy", Dr. 
isoi Fi Moi 

l lull. 

3 p m. "Triumphal Arches", 
II. Alliot, 
4:30 p in. H imission. 

8 p in Gaul', 'Holy City", A. Mil- 
ler, director, Auditorium I i tij I leach 

8 p in. "The Merchant of Veni 
i ii i [omer I'.. Sprague, Y. M. C. \ . 

I [ope -I reel. 

8 p. in. Concert, Mr J. 11. Zinck 
and Mine JohnstonexBishop, Shape 

speare Club House. 

8 p. in. Hiawatha Tableaux, Victoria 
Club, V. W. C. A., Hill street, 
Saturday, Feb. 27 

12:15 p. in. City Club. 

3 p. in. "Among the Followers of 
Mahomet", Shakespeare Club. Pasa- 
dena. 

■8 p. m. Throop Gnome dance, 
Shakespeare Club, Pasadena. 
* * * 

Daughter: "Oh, ibut men are so 
hideously lacking in self-control!" 

Mother: "Don't get feverish about 
it, dear. If they weren't, most girls 
would die old maids." 



The Misses Page 
Boarding and Day School 

Primary — Preparatory — High School 

Single Management but Separate in Location 



FOR BOYS 

137 West Adams Street 

Telephone Home 21203 

A splendid home for boys and 
also a well regulated school- 
home where the character train- 
ing of the 'boy is given the im- 
portance it deserves. The pro- 
verb "Train up the child in the 
way he should go; and when 
he is old he will not depart from 
it," is exemplified at this school. 
Boys here are taught manliness, 
obedience, punctuality, industry 
and learning in a way fitting 
them suitably as foundation 
stones for life's progress- Boys 
of any age after 5 years ad- 
mitted. Each boy is held to be 
an individual. Not being held 
back by class restrictions his 
progress is rapid and certain. 
Boys in addition to the regular 
school studies of our girls 
school are taught sloyd, mili- 
tary drill, vocal and instrumen- 
tal music, also the languages. 
The military department is in 
charge of Captain Robert A. 
Gibbs. 

The school has athletic field 
where boys are taught sports 
and military drill. 

William Himrod, graduate of 
Pomona College and Champion 
mile runner of Pacific coast, is 
in charge of boys' play and 
athletics. 

Call, Telephone or Write for Catalogue 

Pupils Admitted at Any Time 



FOR GIRLS 

243 West Adams Street 

Home Phone 21202 
Sunset South 3539 

Located like boys' school in one 
of most aristocratic residence 
sections of Los Angeles. The 
buildings are well adapted to a 
girls' school; wide verandas, 
upper balconies and beautiful 
grounds, set out to semi-tropical 
shrubbery. Miss Emma E. Page 
and Miss Delia M. Page, prin- 
cipals of these schools, are from 
Hiram College, Ohio, and both 
are Normal graduates. Miss 
Clara J. Armstrong, principal of 
the high school department, is 
a graduate of Oswego State 
Normal School, New York, a 
teacher whose exceptional abil- 
ity and experience along general 
educational lines is well known 
and established. 

Girls here are taught vocal 
and instrumental music, drawing 
and painting, physical culture, 
elocution; these in addition to 
regular school studies. 

Ample facilities are afforded 
for recreation and the girls' 
home training and moral wel- 
fare is attended to in a manner 
to bring out the sweet and beau- 
tiful in character, so essential to 
true womanhood. 



10 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



AMUSEMENTS 



Auditorium 

"Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves", 
at the Auditorium, proves con- 
clusively Manager Crawford's theory 
that Los Angeles is a big show town. 
The demand for seats was so 
great the first week that not half 
the patrons who desired admission 
could be accommodated. The man- 
agement will continue for another 
week this greatest success of the sea- 
son. One hundred and twenty-seven 
people are used to interpret this popu- 
lar play. For the second week many 
new and novel features will be intro- 
duuced, and several creations in stage 
craft, new to this city, will be intro- 
duced. Miss Maud Beatty will sing 
several special selections; little Olga 
Stech, the "dainty delight", will be 
seen to advantage. The comedians, 
Billy Onslow, Roscoe Arbuckle, Wal- 



different hue. The white men and 
women in the play are mere auto- 
mations without resource and weak of 
will; they show no superior force of 
character which might control the un- 
disciplined, surging tides of im- 
pulse that surround them. ''Off with 
their heads" is not the best answer to 
the riddles that confront us day by 
day. There is a better way. Of this 
Mr. Allen gives no hint. The play 
may well be called "yellow" fatality. 
The conditions between the races in 
the south are just bad. That is all. 
The doctor from the north has the 
most vitality of any of the whites in 
the play. The judge brightens up for a 
moment at the prospect of flight when 
it is first proposed to him to sell his 
plantation. The mother lives in the 
invalids small rounds. The blacks 
are more vivid. They lack self con- 
trol but seem dimly to sense their 
power, turbulent fires which only 
need the guiding wick to burst into 
many illuminating flames. Is this ap- 



ed here. In the last act the poison- 
ing of Claire come as an anticlamix 
to the torturing of the negro. .More- 
over she was hidden on the opening 
night hy an unnecessary chair in the 
front of the stage. Such a play as 
"The Master Power" can only arouse 
race hatred where it is dormant, and 
only inflame it, where it already ex- 
ists. Does Mr. Allen mean to justify 
lynch law? His play is based on hate 
and fear. Death is not a solution for 
life however convenient it may be to 
cry "off with their heads" to the 
various riddles which confront us day 
by day. Clara Williams as Dole dis- 
played much force. 



gold gown, song "For Today, for To- 
night" so charmingly that one felt 
like pinching oneself to see if one 
were awake — so unusual is it to hear 
music really sung in comic opera now- 
a-days. And, finally, Hartman and de 
Leon and Kruschke gave an amusing 
burlesque trio which went so well 
that they might have kept up their 
continuous performance indefinitely. 
Apparently the audience would have 
been willing to stay there tiR morning. 
It is a mighty good show and John 
Blackwood ought to make money out 
of the Grand. 



"The Ameer" 

Another of Victor Herbert's compo- 
sitions is delighting Los Angeles — an 
old favorite this time— "The Ameer," 
a three-act comic opera, book by 
Frederick Ranken and Kirk La Shelie. 
Of course the irrepressible and inde- 
fatigable Ferris Hartman is Iffe Khan, 



"Rip Van Winkle" 

Rip and his somnolent drama came 
to the Majestic this week and if he 
awakened the rolling thunders of the 
Catskills he also awakened memories 
of former days when simple and 
homely drama seemed adequate and 
satisfying. Now that we are inured to 
Ibsen and many meanings in every 
line the construction and threads of 




"Giri£" at the Mason 



ter Reed and Ben Sellar, can right- 
fully be called the "Laughing Trust". 
Ben Sellar's song with the Dutch 
Kiddie Girls is one of the hits of the 
performance. The great crystal bal- 
let will be continued. No money 
has been spared in scenery and 
costumes and the production of "Ali 
Baba and the Forty Thieves" is the 
best of its kind ever offered in this 
country. By actual count 13,867 peo- 
ple paid admission last week, to see 
this monster production, and judging 
by the advance sale, the second week, 
which starts Monday, February 22, 
will be even larger than the first. 

As a treat to the thousands of 
school children who will want some 
place of amusement to celebrate 
Washington's Birthday, Monday af- 
ternoon, Manager Crawford will give 
a special matinee performance, and in 
order to give all who desire a chance 
to see this gorgeous production, there 
will be no advance in prices. 



The Master Power 
"The Master Power" presents some 
bare and ugly facts. It is a drama of 
hate and fear. The tangled threads 
of love and solicitude that are inter- 
woven in its coarse fabric are slight 
and broken and overcharged with 
speech. Mr. Allen presents to his au- 
dience the bare bones of the race 
problem, suggesting no solution for 
the tragedy where passion and re- 
venge meet in conflict under skins of 



parent contrast accidental? The play 
seems meaningless without some in- 
tention. Is there a silent purpose in 
the lines? Could this be meant; Re- 
gain thy master power now almost 
lost, thou white man, not by lynch law 
but by a master's service to these 
dark children? Have the whites of the 
South caught a thunderbolt from 
Africa which their scorched and 
scared hands are now no longer able 
to direct? In contrast to its narrfe is 
the significance of the piece "Over- 
whelmed?" It would almost seem so. 
Otherwise it is brutishness unre- 
deemed by art. The piece lacks co- 
herence. Dole's motive for revenge 
seems inadequate. The first act has 
an attractive setting but much of the 
dialogue is idle, and the second act 
opens with the judge sitting in the 
same position on the stage which he 
held at the first rising of the curtain 
and the same singing is heard. This 
shows a lack of invention. The 
scene in Mrs. Claire's sitting room 
would be much improved if the cur- 
tain had fallen when Saul dragged 
Claire into her room. The follow- 
ing pantomime prolonged the horror 
without adding to the intensity ot 
the situation. Claire talks too much 
so that her lover has to maintain ex- 
pectant attitudes until one's muscles 
ache in sympathy with him. When 
the curtain falls on act two one is 
not sure what Dole is suggesting by 
her pointing. More dialogue is need- 



Ameer of Aghanistan, and the part 
suits him capitally. Walter de Leon 
plays the court jester, who has ex- 
hausted his stock of jokes, and in 
his song, "Gee, I'd Like to Find a 
New One", he has made a hit. Chris- 
tine Nielsen, in vivid and very becom- 
ing green tights and a sweeping green 
velvet cloak, impersonates the dis- 
guised American heiress. Her songs 
were most enthusiastically received, 
and "If You Care for Me as You 
Say You Do" was repeatedly encored. 
We have not heard such a pleasing 
voice in comic opera here this season. 
The brigands chorus and the Black- 
jack's song, "If There's Any Kind of 
Crime", gave the second act a good 
start; and when Hartman perched on 
a stump and told how "Peter Clancy 
come from Donegal", with the brig- 
ands singing an accompaniment, the 
house simply couldn't get enough. In 
act three Miss Neilsen in a white and 



"Rip Van Winkle" seem very archaic 
and attenuated. Nevertheless one can- 
not help enjoying the play as one of 
the bits of sentiment which has held 
the attention of the theatre-going pub- 
lic for more than Jwo generations. 
Captain Kidd and his silent band used 
to shiver us with pleasant creepings 
but now it takes a Svengali with his 
hypnotic spells to bring about the 
same sensations. Nowadays a phan- 
tom bowling alley is not strong 
enough psychic tipple to startle our 
deeper mystery loving nerves. How- 
ever Rip remains a familiar figure in 
the imagination and one which is 
likely to continue to be associated 
for many years to come with the 
name of Jefferson. Both the fictitious 
name and the name of the individual 
are suggestive of a genial and happy 
humor, that predisposes us to enjoy 
a quiet hour of fantasy among the 
traditions of Falling Water. "Rip 



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PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



II 



hut II 

play 

M r J 

Hat begin In slumber, 
. lich may b< 

Mr J rri-ii than 



"A Texas Steer" 
I.t" ami the I'. 

mpany will offei " \ 
ithcr hi Hoyt's plays this 
commencing with a special 
ington's Birthday matinee Mon- 
day. Hoyt's lame as one ol the fore- 
\mencaii playwrights of hi? 
time "ii his superlatively 




Flora Norris at the Grand 

clever work in "A Texas Steer". It 
is considered the best stage exposi- 
tion of American politics that has ever 
been written and while other dramat- 
ists have endeavored to attract atten- 
tion with plays of Washington po- 
litical life, Hoyt's achievement as rep- 
resented in "A Texas Steer" remains 
at the head of all such products. 



"A Chinese Honeymoon" 

Ferris Hartman and his merry 
musical associates at the Grand Opera 
House will present the successful 
musical comedy "A Chinese Honey- 
moon" next week, commencing with 
the matinee Sunday. No offering of 
the Hartman season has carried such 
rich promise as does this big London 
and New York triumph. Its songs 
have been sung and hummed and 
whistled for the past three seasons in 
all of the big cities of the east and 
when a traveling syndicate organiza- 
tion first made the piece known to 



iiat here was a musi 

most 
ing might demand, wit 

that haunt one 
ifter the playhouse i- hit be- 
hind, point ol \ i 

II to clTer 
unlimited opportunity, while tin locale 
ol the story will give splendi 
for ei' turning, Herri* Hart- 

man, Christine Nielsen, Muggins 

- and all the other popular fa- 
vorites of the Grand company will 
in the presentation, 
There will be a special Washington's 
Birthday matinee performance Mon- 
day. 



"A Temperance Town" 
After a postponement of one week 
due to the lengthened run of "Faust" 
the Burbank company, beginning with 

a matinee performance Sunday. Feb. 
-'1. will present Charles A. Hoyt's 
comedy, "A Temperance Town", last 
seen locally a year ago when it ran 
for a fortnight at the Burbank theatre. 
I his season only a single week can 
l>e given to the Hoyt piece since Bar- 
rie's delightfully fantastic play of 
"refer Pan", with Blanche Hall in the 
title role and Jessie Mae Hall as 
\\ endy, has been announced to open 
Feb. 23. 



At the Walker 

The new Walker Theatre on Grand 
avenue will give the following vaude- 
ville program next week: Musical la 
.Moines, novelty musical artists; Wil- 
liam Tomkins, the live wire mono- 
logist; Lestrange Sisters, swell sketch- 
ist singers and steppists; Anna Clarke, 
the clever character comedienne; S. 
Kikttda. entirely different Japanese 
jugglers; Joseph Mauley, premier bari- 
tone; Miss Elma El wood, prima donna 
so, rano; The Walkerscope, new scen- 
ic and comic motion pictures. 



Plays and Players 

Dainty Florence Gear, who won the 
regard of local playgoers last season 
in another vehicle, will bring her 
smart musical play, "Marrying Mary", 
to Hamburger's Majestic theatre for 
the week beginning tomorrow (Sun- 
day). 

"Marrying Mary" is a comedy with 
music rather than a musical comedy; 
yet its music, composed by Silvio 
Hein, is of musicianly quality far be- 
yond the usual so-called "popular" 
stuff of the day. The book is the 
work of Edwin Milton Royle, author 
of "The Squaw Man", "Friends" and 
other successful plays. "Marrying 
Mary" is his first attempt at comedy, 
but in it he has proved his ability in 
the new field. 

Miss Gear, whose winsome person- 
ality and attractive stage appearance 
have contributed in no small measure 
to her success, plays the role ot 
Marrying Mary Montgomery, thrice 
a divorcee and in search of still an- 
other husband to conquer. She be- 
comes engaged to a young man who 
is vice-president of the Anti-Divorce 
League and who. naturally, has been 
kept ignorant of the existence of his 



I lun the thrci 
i a siimiii where 

"Miss" Mi and her 

taj ing and the fun bi 
of the former husbands is a United 

another, a Morman 

bishop; and the t 111 i | man 

about town As a matter of . 

there an many complications, ill of 

which add to the prevailing hilarity. 

+ + + 

Baumgardt Lecture 

The third ol the Baumgardt 
of travelogues will be given in 
plumy ball. Blanchard building. Sun 
day evening, February 21. continuing 

without any more intermissions until 
the entire scries has been completed 

"London, the World's Metropolis", 

has been selected for the subji 
the evening lecture, and as Mr. Baum- 
i has added a great many new- 
slides to bis already great number ami 
more extensive lecture material than 
last year when this travelogue was 
first given in this city. 

The following four new lectures will 
be given on February 28, March 7, 
March 14 and March 21 respectively: 
"Athens and the Age of Pericles", 
"The Castles and the Legends of the 
Rhyne", "The New Norway" and 
"Switzerland, the Playground of Eu- 
rope." 



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12 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



MUSIC 



The Lott-Krauss Chamber Concert 

The most pleasing and satisfying 
ensemble work of the season was 
heard at the Lott-Krauss concert 
Thursday night. The Dvorak Quintet 
especially was entered into with a 
verve and virility unequaled in any 
previous concert this season. Mr. 
Dalhousie Young's playing of the 
pianoforte part was masterful and fin- 
ished, lending sonority and yet al- 
ways entirely subservient to the 
strings. Indeed, Mr. Young's person- 
ality seemed to he a guiding spirit 
that made unity, balance and bril- 
liance. In this quintet are found two 
of Dvorak's favorite forms, quite 
different from the regular sonata form 
as developed by Beethoven, the 
Dumka, or "elegy", in place of the 
Andante and the Furiant in place of 
the Scherzo. The broad and beauti- 
ful C minor quartet of Max Bruch was 
given a warm hut dignified reading, 
which displayed the serious musical 
nature and refinement of the com- 
poser. The Russian Quartet proved 
little more than a novelty, its four 
movements ibeing builded upon the 
same theme of three notes, B-flat, A 
and F, which compose the name Be- 
la-ieff. Mr. 'Belaieff, long since. dead, 
was a music publisher who founded 
the Glinka Competition from which 
Rachmaninow received first prize for 
composition last December. 

Mr. Lott was in splendid voice and 
sang five charming songs by Waldo 
F. IChase of this city. The songs are 
all delightful in thought and musical 
setting happily conceived. Mr. Lott 
bowed his thanks again and again but 
the audience would not be satisfied 
until Mr. Chase also acknowledged 
his share of the honors. Mrs. Lott 
supported at the piano with her usual 
full but unobtrusive accompaniment. 

The programme in detail follows: 

PART I 

Quartette, C Minor Max Bruch 

Andante Allegro ma non troppo 
Adagio 

Scherzo Allegro Molto 
. Molto Vivace 
Songs: 

Silent Safety Waldo F. Chase 

Der Seelenkranke. ..Waldo F. Chase 

Meersheimweh Waldo F. Chase 

The Butterfly Waldo F. Chase 

Fuer Dich Waldo F. Chase 

Mr. Harry Clifford Lot. 

PART II 
Quartette, B-La-F. (To Mr. Be- 
Laieff). 

Sostenuto. Allegro 

Rimsky-Korsakow 

Scherzo ......; Liadow 

Serenata alia Spagnola Borodine 

Finale Glazounow 

Quintet, A Major, Op. 81 iDivorak 

Allegro, ma non fanto 
Andante con moto — Dumka 
Scherzo — Furiant 
Finale — Allegro. 
(Mr. Dalhousie Young at the piano) 
G. BARRETT. 



Organ Recital 

Mr. Sessions gave his seventy-sec- 
ond organ recital Wednesday after- 
noon. He opened with a group of 
old organ works written in the seven- 
teenth and eighteenth centuries, 
among which the most charming was 
the Musette by Dandrieu, two simple 
little melodies played over a softly 
sustained pedal note. The Suite Ele- 
giaque by Rodolphe Lavotta was ex- 
tremely modern in color and very in- 
teresting. Mr. F. Walter Seagar, 
baritone, rendered his beautiful solo, 
"The Publican," by Van de Water, 
more or less monotonous by his con- 
tinuous use of the vibrato. The last' 
two organ numbers by Dubois were 
also in the modern mode and proved 
grateful work to the organist. 

GERTRUDE BARRETT. 



Last Mixed Symphony 

Friday afternoon, March 5, at the 

Auditorium, will be the last "mixed" 

program of the Symphony season, as 

the last concert will be devoted en- 

. tirely to Wagnerian music. 

'For this fifth concert Herr Ignaze 
Haroldi will be the soloist, playing the 
famous Saint-Saens concerto, and at 
the close of the first rehearsal with the 
orchestra he was received with tre- 
mendous applause. 

The symphony for this afternoon 
will be the dainty little "Rustic Wed- 
ding" Symphony of Goldmark's, the 
remaining numbers to be MacDowell's 
symphonic poem "Laucelot and 
Elaine", and Glinka's overture, "A 
Life for the iCzar". 

MUSICAL NOTES 



By F. C. T. 



Mr. iCampanari, when interviewed 
regarding the Grand Opera project, 
proved most enthusiastic on the sub- 
ject. 

Among other things, he explained 
that the idea of giving Los Angeles 
twenty-four weeks of Grand Opera 
was not a money making scheme, but 
is being organized primarily for its 
beneficial effect on the city as a whole 
and on individual citizens. Any city 
where Grand Opera has been an an- 
nual feature has benefited by the 
wide-spread advertising w J hich it re- 
ceives, and Los Angeles can reach, 
not only the West, but through the 
thousands of winter tourists, the East 
also. 

It will -he the policy of the manage- 
ment to utilize the resources of this 
city in every way possible, both in 
the manufacture of costumes and 
stage properties, and in the formation 
of orchestra and chorus. Some idea 
of the magnitude of these branches 
will be: understood when it is learned 
that in the neighborhood of ten thous- 
and costumes will be required, be- 
sides quantities of scenery and other 
stage;, paraphernalia. 

As "far as possible the chorus will 
be filled up from local talent and this 
will offer an opening for many ambi- 
tious young singers. A permanent 
orchestra will also be employed for 
five months of the year. 

The project will receive financial 
backing from some of the wealthy 



Mx&s Sailer lutbr 

VOICE CULTURE 

French, German and Italian diction 

Coaching for Opera, Concert and 

Oratorio 

Studio 330 Blanchard Building 

Exchange 82 

Monday and Thursday mornings; 
Tuesday and Friday afternoons. 

Residence Phone A 9045 



Blanchard Hall Studio Building 

Devoted exclusively to Music, Art, Science 

Studios and Halls for all purposes for rent. Largest 
Studio building in the West. For terms and all infor- 
mation apply to F. W. BLANCHARD, 
233 S. Broadway - - 232 S. Hill St. 
Los Angeles, California 



Frank H. Colby 

(Organist Cathedral of St. Vibiana) 
TEACHER OF 

PIANO, ORGAN 
and HARMONY 



Residence Studio, 1424 Reid Street 
PHONE 54197 

Blanchard Building 

wed's and sat-s Phone 10082 



Oscar Selling 

BLANCHARD HALL 
Tuesday Eve., Feb. 23 
830 O'CLOCK 

At itjf IJiann 

Miss Alice Coleman 



Reserved Seats, 50c, 75c, $1.00 

FOR SALE AT 

lartlt tt 4Hu0tr (Ha. 

20th Feb. Only Opposite Cily Hal 1 



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The pronounced success of the Starr Piano is not due to any one 
special feature, but is the result of a combination of numberless good 
points that stamp it as a distinctive production in high class piano 
construction. Fine art catalogue in colors mailed on application. 

THE STARR PIANO CO. 

Manufacturers 
Factory Warerooms 413 WEST FIFTH STREET 




Nearly Two for One 

You can almost get two pianos now for the price of one while our 
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never again be possible, so it will surely pay you to come in at once. 

We Move to Broadway about February 

20th 



113- 113 'h SO SPRING ST 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



13 



Mr 

ular nighl 

French 

. -m" and "Hansel and ' irctel " 
li .. that the stage roan 

mlicr 
will open 




mlrr- 
niany Mendel- 
heen 
celebrated .ill over the country 
1909. 

Mi. Heart! Dreyfus has 

hat from the 
Iraek. in plannr nten 

rinn March and April 

ai tin- Friday Morning Club. Al- 
though non-sectarian, these hew 
musical meditation will bi 
ciently religious character to accord 
with tlie -pint of the season Mrs. 
•us will he assisted by Mrs 
Hennion Robinson ami the Fuhrer 
String Quartette 

Mrs. Dreyfus will jive a recital be- 
fore the Woman's Club of San Ber- 
nardino on February 24. 



Mrs. Estei.le Heartt Dreyfus 

vember 13. Mr. Campanari leaves for 
Europe in a few weeks to select his 
- iloists and make other arrangements 
-ary. 
The production of Grand Opera in 
this city cannot fail to be of lasting 
benefit in the development of a taste 
for the great and lasting things in 
music, among the people of Los An- 
geles. 



Everyone knows of the Greet play- 
ers, who play one week's engagement, 
April 18 at the Shrine Auditorium 
under the auspices of the Shrincrs, 
hut not so much is known of the 
Symphony Orchestra which they are 
bringing in conjunction with their 
dramatic work. 

This spring will be the first trans- 
continental tour of this organization, 
which is one of the most noted 
musical organizations in New York 
City. Formed six years ago under 
the direction of Modest Altschuler, by 
a group of graduates of the Moscow 
and St. Petersburg Conservatories, 
who were playing in the Philharmonic 
and New York Symphony Orchestras, 
it attained instant popularity with the 
New York public. It has since re- 
mained, through the co-operation of 
an influential group of guarantors, an 
individual organization famed for the 
genius of its conductor, the virtuosity 
of its players and the originality of 
the works of the new Russian com- 
posers for which it has made success- 
ful propaganda. 

The first presentation of this gi- 
gantic combination of dramatic com- 
pany and whole Symphony orchestra 
will be Shakespeare's favorite come- 
dy, •'Midsummer Night's Dream" 
with the famous Mendelssohn music; 



The production of Richard Strauss': 
new opera, "Electra", was aw aited 
with interest by musical people in 
three continents, over two hundred 
critics from North and South America, 
and Europe being present. In 
"Salome", Strauss had proved him- 
self capable of really great moments, 
and it was hoped that in this' later 
work he would show more artistic bal- 
ance. However, the production of 
"Electra", in Dresden, revealed all the 
faults of Salome accentuated, the 
music being more bewiideringly com- 
plex, and the action less intelligent 
and interesting. It is a well-known 
fact that Strauss only tolerates words 
and the human voice in his production 
and it has been lately told of him 
that he signalled to the conductor' to 
stop in one of the final rehearsals of 
"Electra" saying, "That must be 



rendition- an . \ 
nality; 
in hearing him play one i- always 
sure of new light upon even the most 
well-known of compositions, His 
technique, brilliant and clear, is of that 
absolutely sure quality that is s.. im 
mensely satisfactory, ami at the 
time he Uses it. not a- an end in it 
-elf. bni as the firm basis upon which 
to rear a thoroughly artistic concep- 
tion. Although lie 1- 

already an artist of rare calibre I 

one who will go far. Mi-- \ln. i ol< 
man, the well known pianistc, will a-- 
-i-t at tlie i 

lie has both the temperament and 
the technical skill t.i make Ui li a pro- 
gram as he ha- selected most satis- 
fying Besides the well known and 
much beloved G minor I oncerto of 
Max Bruch, he has chosen two num- 
bers by llnlijy — a Carmen Fantasie 
and Scenes de la Scardaa Wieniaw- 
ski Polonaise and the familiar Zigeun- 
erweisen by Pablo dc Sarasate. 




OaKAR SEIUNG 

played again, I could hear the voices 

of the singers." 



Two 

musical I ,i - Angeli - « ill 
given in Simp-, m Audi 

Gabrilowitsch on March .1. 
and David I'.i-pliam ..n M . i r 



Oskar Selling, the young violin vir- 
tuoso of Munich, will give a recital 
at Blanchard Hall next Tuesday even- 
ing, February 23. During the short 
time he has been in the city Seiling 
has established himself in the front 
rank of concert artists, and, judging 
from the well balanced program he 
offers and his previous performance-, 
this should be an enjoyable concert 
I hat music lovers can hardly afford to 
miss. A pupil of Joachim, whose in- 
fluence is plainly to be discerned in 



Miss Ethel Coleman sings at a 
sacred concert Sunday evening, Feb. 
21, at Hotel Green, Pasadena. 



Mrs. Jones-Simmons and Mi-s 
Nelle McPherrin, Blanchard Hall, 
have begun evening classes in voice 
culture, for the convenience of young 
men and women who are employed 
during the day. Musical talks supple- 
mented by vocal and instrumental pro- 
grams, will be a feature of the course. 



The Ellis Club will in future hold 
rehearsals in Symphony Hall, Blanch- 
ard Building, every Tuesday evening. 



Rudolf Trinel will be heard in piano 
recital some time in March. 



A recognized virtuoso at the early 
age of eighteen years, Mischa Elman, 
the Russian violinist, has taken New 
York by storm. His European tour, 
just completed, has been an unquali- 
fied success, and he has even been 
spoken 'of as the world's coming 
violinist. 



Miss C. E. Gleason has opened the 
Los Angeles Music Shop in the 
Blanchard Building, and will carry a 
full line of octavo, orchestra, and 
sheet music. 



Oskar Seiling gave a violin recital 
at the Shakespeare Club House, Pasa- 
dena, Tuesday evening last, he was 
assisted by Miss Alice Coleman, 
pianist. 



Mr. Dupuy is preparing an unusual- 
ly varied and attractive program for 
the fotrhcoming concert of the Or- 
pheus iClub. 



The next offering of the Y. M. C. A. 
Euterpean Lyceum Course will be the 
Colonial Saxophone Quartette, as- 
sisted by Miss Victoria Lynn, reader 
and impersonator. They appear on 
March 1. 



Henry Edward Krehbicl. In this 

i-lv illustrated, and interesting 

\. ilume, Mr Krehbii I n us 






Japanese and Oriental 

Art Curios 

KIMONOS ANT) 
EMBfiOIVERIES 

You make no mistake when buying 
of us, as we keep only genuine 
articles of the highest quality — 
our prices are reasonable. 

Kafyuchi Bros. 

"DireCt Importers 

533 South Broadway 



FOR RENT 

Studios and Assembly Halls 
in the 

Walker Auditorium 
Building 

Just being completed on Grand 
Avenue near 7tn St. 



WALTER JENKINS, Superintendent 
ART BUILDING 



J 



Home Phone F 5119 



Sunset Main 213 



John & James 

SHEEHAN 

DECORATORS 
WALL PAPER and PAINTS 

900-902 S. BROADWAY 



Joseph R. Loftus Co., Inc. 

128 West. 6th St.. 

Phone*- Main and F 5518 
... Oraoge Ranches and Country Property... 



Andirons— Grates- 
Fire Sets 

In Jtrtlstle Designs 

Domestic and Imported Tiles 
Pacific Tile & Mantel Co. 

716-718 SOUTH SPRING STREET 



One of the new books of musical 
interest is "Chapters of Opera" by 



J. E. MEYER 


StocKs. Bonds and Investments 


Broker and Dealer in 


HIGH GRADE SECURITIES 


202 Mercantile Place 


at Spring St. 



14 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



a great many historical and critical 
observations and records concerning 
the Lyric Drama in New York city, 
from its earliest days down to the 
present time. 



Gaul's "Holy City" will be given in 
the Auditorium, Long Beach, next 
Friday evening, Mr. Abraham Miller 
conducting. The soloists will be: 
Soprano, Mrs. Holtzclaw; contralto, 
Mrs. Mabel L. Potter, and Mr. Edwin 
House, basso; accompanist, Miss 
Lynn. 

* * * 

Resolved, that I will not seek any 
praise or glory for myself, nor will I 
be discouraged by any criticism of my 
efforts, but I will try humbly to prof- 
it by either should it come to me. — 
B. C. Cory. 

* * * 



HIT OR MISS 



The scholarship plan was first es- 
tablished in Philadelphia to afford aid 
to deserving pupils in the public 
schools. Los Angeles is the fourth 
city to profit by this system. Mrs. 
iDlon Harrison was greatly interested 
in extending the service of this ex- 
cellent device among children in Los 
Angeles. Since her dearth her friends 
have undertaken to found a permanent 
fund to be known as the "Anna Har- 
rison .Scholarship." It will provide 
for an outlay of $156 a year which is 
given to the student each Friday night 
in equal installments throughout the 
school year. There are twenty such 
scolarships at present existing in this 
city. This is a graceful and worthy 
tribute to the memory of Mrs. Har- 
rison from her many and loyal friends. 



Arthur Letts spoke before the City 
Club on last Saturday on the "Duty 
the Business Man Owes to the State." 



He paid a high tribute to the mem- 
bers of the legislature who represent 
this part of the state. In speaking 
of politicians generally he said that 
they are not as bad as they are 
painted and that we could not expect 
to get men .of the finest quality in 
politics until we quirt villifying their 
private characters. He told the' story 
of a man who came to him and asked: 
"Do you know how to tell an honest 
man without ever making a mistake 
in your judgment?" Mr. Letts said 
that he did not possess this invaluable 
insight. The gentleman replied: 
"Well, make your man open his hand 
and if there is hair growing on his 
palm he is honest." 



day, his subject being "Civic Prob- 
lems." 



Miss Emma Abigail Smith has de- 
signed an attractive book plate for 
her brother, Mr. Wayland Smith. He 
has had it printed in a pale neutral 
tint which brings out rthe dainty and 
artistic quality of the workmanship. 
The upper panel of the plate is es- 
pecially well done. This book plate 
will embellish the volumes in Mr. 
Smith's extensive and well selected li- 
brary. 



Mr. Moody, the author of the suc- 
cessful play, "The Great Divide," has 
been visiting Mr. William Wendt, 
who has his studio on Sichel street. 
Mr. Moody has written another drama 
called the "Faith Healer," which is 
about to be produced in St. Louis. 
Mr. Moody, in company with Mr. 
Wendt and M*\ Putoff, last week 
explored, approximately enough the 
divide between the San Fernando Val- 
ley and rthe Simi valley, traveling for 
the purpose over the Santa Susanna 
pass which they found in a deplorably 
muddy condition. Mr. Moody is also 
the author of some charming verse. 



On Wednesday last the University 
Club gave a musical and ladies' night. 

Friends of Paloma Schramm will be 
glad to learn of her debut with the 
Theodore Thomas Orchestra in Chi- 
cago. Miss Schramm is How seventeen 
years old and has developed from a 
prodigy into an artist of very decided 
capabilities. It will be remembered 
that she was a pupil of Herr Becker 
and appeared in concert here, display- 
ing rather remarkable ability in im- 
provisation. Since leaving Los An- 
geles, she has been working hard until 
she has been able to play with such 
an organization as the Thomas Or- 
chestra and ito play such compositions 
as require the technic of a virtuoso. 
Her program included the Beethoven 
"Emperor" Concerto, the Grieg A 
minor and a group of IChopin. 

Major F. R. Burnham passed 
through Los Angeles ten days ago on 
his way to the Yaqui River Country, 
Mexico. He was accompanied by the 
Richardson brothers and other men 
who are associated with him in the 
development of 700,000 acres of land 
in this fertile region. For the time 
being the energies of the company 
that holds these lands will be devoted 



to bringing water to the settlers al- 
ready in the locality, all land having 
been withdrawn from sale for the 



present. 



Dr. L. M. Powers addressed the 
students of the Normal School on 
Tuesday last, explaining to them the 
workings of the Board of Health. He 
told rthem what precautions should be 
taken to prevent the spread -of disease, 
giving them many practical hints in 
this regard. 

Jules Pages will give an exhibition 
of his pictures at Steckel's gallery be- 
ginning early in March. 



Christian Science Services 

Second Church of Christ Sci- 
entist. — Simpson Auditorium, 
734 S. Hope Street. Services 
Sunday 11 a. m. and 8 p. m. ; 
sermon from the Christian Sci- 
ence Quarterly. Subject "Mind." 
Children's Sunday School 9:30 
a. m. Wednesday evening meet- 
ing at 8 o'clock at Simpson Aud- 
itorium, and also the Gamut 
Club, 1044 S. Hope S. Hope St., 
at 8:15. Reading rooms, 510-511 
Herman W. Hellman Bldg., 
Spring and Fourth Sts., open 
daily, Sundays excepted, from 9 
a. m. to 9 p. m. 



T. E. Gibbon, editor of the Los An- 
geles Herald, spoke before the stu- 
dents of Occidental College yester- 



Retiring from Business— Selling Out 
Furniture, Carpets, Rugs, Draperies, Etc. 

Radical reductions in all lines throui-hout our entire stock— genuine 
bargains for everyone; choicest sorts of home-furnishings at the or- 
dinary price of common-place. Watch daily papers for special an- 
nouncements. 

\ps &n§eles furniture Qo. 

631-633-635 SOUTH SPRING ST. 

Between SIXTH and SEVENTH STREETS 

Furniture, Carpets, Rugs. Draperies and Wall Papers 
Exclusive Productions of Highest Character 



Report of the Condition of the 



Citizen's National Bank of Los Angeles 

In the State of California 
At the Close of Business, February 5th, 1909 



, „, RESOURCES 

Loans and Discounts 

Overdrafts, secured and unsecured. '..'.'.'.'. .' 

U. S. Bonds to secure circulation 

U. S. Bonds to secure TJ. S. Deposits 

Premiums on U. S. Bonds 

Bonds, securities, etc 

Banking house, Furniture and Fixtures. ..'.'.'.'.'..'.'.'.'.'.'."" '.'. 
Due from National Banks (not reserve agentsi . . . . J326.962.04 
Due from State and Private Banks and Bankers, 

Trust Companies and Saving's Banks 72,193.30 

Due from approved Reserve Agents 390 572.87 

Checks and other Cash Items 9.073.15 

Exchanges for Clearing House 85 007.61 

Notes of other National Banks • 6,425.00 

Fractional Paper Currency. Nickels and Cents.... 356.84 

Lawful Money Reserve in Bank, viz.: 

Specie 397,039.35 

Legal-tender notes 14,808.00 



$2,309,235.91 
8.821.2S 
000.00 
000.00 
050.00 
050.00 
000.00 



185,( 

50, ( 

7,1 

102,( 
45,( 



Redemption fund with TJ. S. Treasurer (5 per cent, of circu- 
lation) . : 



1,302, 
9, 



438.16 
250.00 



Total $4,018,845.33 

STATE .OF CALIFORNIA. 
COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, ss. 

I, A. J. Waters, Cashier of the above-named bank, do solemnly swear 
that the above statement is true to the best of my knowledge and belief. 

A. J. WATERS. Cashier. 
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 10th dav of Feb. 1909. 
(Seal) C. E. FISH, Notary Public. 

Correct — Attest: 

JNO. J. FAY. JR., 
L. W. BLINN, 
ROBT. HALE, 

Directors. 



LIABILITIES 

Capital stock paid in $ 

Surplus fund 

Undivided Profits, less Expenses and Taxes paid 

National Bank Notes outstanding 

Due to other National Banks $ 214.476.37 

Due to State and Private Banks and Bankers... 230,070.74 

Due to Trust Companies and Savings Banks 406,581.13 

Dividends unpaid 1,050.00 

Individual Deposits subject to check 2,115,530.07 

Demand Certificates of Deposit 25,384.81 

Certified Checks 4,429.14 

Cashier's Checks outstanding 11.723.41 

United States Deposits 40,000.00 

Liabilities other than those above stated (letters 

of credit) 2,100.69 



300, 
300, 
134, 
183, 



000.00 
000.00 
298.99 
200.00 



3,101,346.36 



Total $4,018,845.35 

OFFICERS 

R. J. WATERS President 

J. ROSS CLARK Vice-President 

A. J. WATERS Cashier 

GEO. E. F. DUFFET Assistant Cashier 

E. T. PETTIGREW Assistant Cashier 



R. J. Waters 
J. Ross Clark 
A. G. Hubbard 
L. W. Blinn 



. DIRECTORS 

J. M. Hale 
John H. Norton 
C. A. Canfield 
E. L. Doheny 



E. G. Fay 
Robert Hale 
Jno J. Fay, Jr. 
A. J, Waters 



Popular Misconceptions of Ch 

PACIflC 




Vol. VI. Mo. 9. 



Los Mngeles, California, February 27, 1909- 



lO Cents $2 JO a Year 



Published Every Saturday 

Lissner Building. Los Angeles, California, by the 

PACIFIC OUTLOOK COMPANY 

Subscription price S2.00 a year in advance. 

Single copies 10 cents at all news st-nds. 

NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERS— The Pacific Out- 
look is mailed to subscribers through the Los 
Angeles Post Office every Friday, and should 
be delivered in every part of the city by Satur- 
day's post. If for any reason it should be de- 
layed, or be delivered in poor condition, sub- 
scribers will confer a favor upon the publishers 
by giving them immediate notice. 

Entered ■■ second-class mallet April c, 1937, at the postoence at 
Los Anfeies. California, under toe act of Congress of March J, 1879. 

Tbe Editor of Ibe Pacific Outlook cannot guarantee to return 
manuacripta lough he will endeavor to do ao if stamps for that purpose 
are incloaed with them. If your manuscript ia valuable, keep a copv of it. 



THE PACIFIC OUTLOOK'S POLICY 
The Tacific Outlook desires to state unequivo- 
cally that it is not the organ of any creed, sect, 
political party, organization, corporation or per- 
son, but is absolutely free and untrammelled in 
its associations. 

It stands unqualifiedly, and without fear, for 
that which it believes to be true, clean, honest 
and right in human affairs — political, secular. 
commercial and industrial; and in its columns 
will always maintain an unprejudiced and im- 
partial attitude in its discussion of all subjects 
of universal or local interest. 

GEORGE BAKER ANDERSON, Editor 



COMMENT 



HIS HONOR'S FAUX PAS 



IT IS difficult to understand where His 
Honor, A. C. Harper, mayor pro tern of Los 
Angeles, ever got his reputation as a poli- 
tician. He is even as complete a failure in 
this direction as he is and has been as chief 
executive of this city. Both these propo- 
sition-, are. we think, susceptible of complete 
proof. The latter has been proven, so it 
would iie a waste of words to discuss it. 

Let us look at Harper as a politician. 
Harper appointed lid Kern to the Board of 
Public Works. Really, this simple state- 
ment in itself is sufficient to prove the con- 
tention that Harper is an incompetent as a 
politician. But the stupidest piece of po- 
litical folly which it has ever been our un- 
alloyed pleasure to witness was that of 
which Harper was guilty last week. 

Whether somebody from Sacramento wrote 
or telegraphed to Harper that he might 
snatch victory from the jaws of defeat by 
going to the state capital and taking a hand 
in the fight on the consolidation bills at a 
critical time, is one of those things which 
may never become generally known. It 
makes no difference whether Harper was ad- 
vised to go to Sacramento by Senator Sav- 
age or somebody else on the spot, whether 
he went on his own initiative, or whether his 
friend and confidant. Isadore Dockweiler. 
or Mime member of his cabinet — Danny Ken- 
nedy for instance — suggested that it would 



great stunt. The fact is that the mayor 

went to Sacramento. He went like the king 

of France and he came back like the king 

of Gaul (if there is any error in the or- 
thography employed, we trust it will be 
.i\ erlooked). 

From the outset, Harper's design was 
obvious. Anybody who realizes the dire 

straits in which he found himself, who '■• < 
come to understand the nature of the man, 
will have little trouble in reaching the con- 
clusion that Harper's chief if not his sole 
motive in going to Sacramento and "hut- 
ting in" to the consolidation fight was to ob- 
tain a little additional political capital which 
he might invest in his business of deluding 
the people of Los Angeles into the belief that. 
il would he profitable to continue "his hon- 
or" in office until the end of his term. 

The Herald and Express of this city have 
told the story of the Harper-Dockweiler- 
Savage fiasco. Thanks to the epiick work 
of the real friends of Los Angeles who were 
on the scene. Harper's blunder injured no- 
body but himself. But there is a lesson in 
this Harper incident, and a moral, too. The 
moral has been couched in terms familiar 
to us all. It runs something like this : 

' 'Twere folly t° attempt simian tricks 
with the buzz-saw." 

afs a|s aft 

WHEN HOPE DIETH 



WITH the enactment of the so-called Mc- 
Cartney-Leeds consolidation bill into law, 
the last hope of the Southern Pacific railroad 
that the people of the great Southwest may 
be deprived of the use of the great harbor 
at San Pedro except under the payment of 
a tribute to the railroad, will die. 

It is not necessary to go into the history 
of the long and desperate struggle between 
the people of California on the one hand and 
the greedy, thriving Southern Pacific rail- 
road on the other hand. It is hardly the 
time for recriminations, and yet it is almost 
impossible to discuss this matter without 
referring, at least, to the notoriously un- 
friendly attitude of the railroad corporation. 

It is seldom that such desperate efforts 
have been made to obscure the real issue in 
a matter before the legislature as in the 
case of which we are writing. While the 
measure has been known as a consolidation 
bill, and while it is a general law providing 
for the merging of two cities situated as are 
Los Angeles and San Pedro, the fact is, as 
every intelligent person in Southern Cali- 
fornia knows, that the real issue dependent 
upon this act was: Shall Southern Califor- 
nia have at San Pedro a harbor free to the 
commerce of the Southwest and of the 
world, or shall it indefinitely pay tribute to a 
selfish railroad corporation which for years 
iias sought to convert that magnificent heri- 
tage of the people into a private chattel? 

The hope of the Southern Pacific railroad 
company that it could continue to bullyrag 
and intimidate and bluff the people of Cali- 
fornia into obedience to its dictates will die 
the moment that James N. Gillett appends 



In- signature to the measure i.ommi 

known as the Met 'annex -1 .nil- hill. And if 
the railroad imagines for one oment that 
its hope of further domination of the state 

i- not dead, that hope will he sufficiently 

crushed, we surmise, when the Governor ap- 
proves the Wright-Stanton direct primary 
bill. 

i alifornia is coming into her own. for 
which, praises he unto the Creator of this 
glorious state. The shackles of the mon- 
strous iniquity known as Southern Pacific 
control have been severed. The state is free. 
So long have we been in thralldom that it 
may be some little time yet before we come 
fully to realize that liberty has been attained. 
But, men and women of California, we are 
free. The tyrant — the tyrant is nothing but 
an incubus. Shake yourself — awaken — and 
you will fully discern that the once frightful 
monster of your dreams has become a thing 
as diaphanous as a woman's veil. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

"HONEST GEORGE" 



"HONEST GEORGE", alias "Uncle 
George", Alexander will be the next mayor 
of Los Angeles. If there be any person pos- 
sessing within the recesses of his bosom a 
good and sufficient reason why this should 
not be so, why there should be no official 
union between Los Angeles and Honest 
George Alexander, let him now appear and 
have his say or forever after hold his peace. 

Los Angeles has many men who would 
honor the mayoralty. Far be it from us to 
take the position that George Alexander is 
the only man qualified to fill this position, 
or that he is one of a comparatively small 
number who, if called upon to serve the city, 
would give Los Angeles a splendid business 
administration. While we have men of the 
required standard who may be counted by 
the score, we have few who have been tried 
so thoroughly in public life as the man who 
has been united upon as the successor to 
the present discredited incumbent. 

George Alexander has "made good" in 
public life. As a member of the Board of 
Supervisors he was ever on the alert, watch- 
ing the treasury of Los Angeles county and 
raising a warning crv every time he discov- 
ered an attempt at pilfering or jobbery. 

There may be a dozen George Alexanders 
in Los Angeles — yes, there may be a thou- 
sand of them for all we know — but we are 
absolutely certain that there is at least one, 
and we have the man. 

The defeat of George Alexander at the 
election soon to be called would be one of 
the greatest catastrophes in municipal his- 
tory in America ; but there will be no such 
thing as defeat. The people of Los Angeles 
are determined that the affairs of their city 
shall be placed in the hands of a man in 
whom thev have confidence. Everv person 
who stands by Mayor Harper at this time, 
ever after, in all circumstances, arrays him- 
self on the side of corruption and vice. The 
line has been drawn taut. The safe thing to 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



do, for those who care for their reputations 
as citizens, is to stay on the right side and 
not press too closely to the line. 

* * * 

A PRETTY SCHEME 



WHAT is now beginning to be under- 
stood as one of the most comprehensive 
plans for the establishment of a political 
machine intended to perpetuate the power 
of the "organization" forces in the Republi- 
can party in California has been uncovered 
in Governor Gillett's project for a great sys- 
tem of state highways, as outlined in two^ 
bills introduced into the Assembly by Mr. 
Coghlan of San Francisco and identical 
measures introduced into the Senate by Sen- 
ator Estudillo. 

These bills provide, in brief, for what on 
its face appears to be an elaborate highway 
system extending from one end of the state 
to the other. An appropriation of eighteen 
millions of dollars is made, subject to rati- 
fication by the electors of the state. With 
these eighteen millions, Governor Gillett 
proposes to equip a political commission 
with powers greater than those now held by 
any other commission in the state, if not 
greater than those allotted to any official 
body of men in the United States, excepting 
legislatures. 

No bill presented to the State Legislature 
for its consideration for years has been so 
full of "bugs." In the first place, the work 
of road-building is to be intrusted to the 
state department of engineering, which is 
dominated by politicians subject to the 
whims of the Governor. Secondly, this de- 
partment is vested with full power to pur- 
chase, practically in any way that may suit 
its will, rights of way, quarries or other 
land necessary to the construction of the 
system ; to "purchase all supplies, material, 
machinery, and to do all other things neces- 
sary or proper in the construction and main- 
tenance of said state highway." Thirdly, 
there is nothing in the proposed law to pre- 
vent the commission from awarding con- 
tracts for the construction of the system, in 
small sections, by political favorites. 
Fourthly, and this is the worst feature of the 
bill, there is absolutely nothing to show 
where it is proposed to have the system 
built. No provision is made for a prelimi- 
nary survey to be made 1 before the ratifica- 
tion of the bill providing for the issuance of 
bonds. 

Section 2 of the bill (Assembly Bill No. 
991) provides as follows: 

"As soon as practicable after the passage 
of this act, it shall be the duty of the de- 
partment of engineering to survey, lay out 
and adopt a continuous and connected state 
highway system running north and south 
through the state, traversing the Sacramen- 
to and San Joaquin valleys and along the 
Pacific coast by the most convenient, direct 
and practicable routes, connecting the 
county seats of the several counties through 
which it passes and joining the centers of 
population, together with such branch 
roads as may be necessary to connect there- 
with the several county seats lying east and 
west of such state highway." 

Specific, isn't it? The description of the 
route of the system proposed by the Gover- 
nor could not be much more vague. 

With all due respect to Governor Gillett 
and the gentlemen who introduced his biil 
into the Legislature, the Pacific Outlook 
submits that our chief executive has put the 
cart before the horse. If he is sincere in his 
system of scientifically constructed high-" 



ways which shall be of the greatest practical 
utility to the greatest possible proportion of 
inhabitants, let him propose a bill providing 
for a preliminary survey, in detail, and the 
drafting and publication of a map setting 
forth the location of every mile of the sys- 
tem, so that the people of California may 
know where the highways are to be built 
before being asked to vote upon any such 
appropriation as eighteen millions of dollars. 
Let him not submit a rough proposition in- 
volving the expenditure of a certain amount 
per mile for a specified number of miles 
until he shall have ascertained, and ac- 
quainted the voters and taxpayers of the 
state with the facts relating thereto, how 
many miles are to be constructed and how 
much the cost will be, according to esti- 
mates of a commission of experts. 

These are but a handful of objections to 
the bill which the Governor seeks to convert 
into law. There are many other|s. The 
worst thing about the bill is that it provides 
for the organization of a great force of em- 
ployes under the immediate direction of a 
political commission, to be appointed and re- 
moved at the will of such commission, with- 
out regard to qualifications. 

It does not require a man of the greatest 
powers of discernment to see the possibili- 
ties in this direction. If these bills should 
pass California would witness the upbuild- 
ing of a political machine the stability and 
effectiveness of which have no present equal 
in the country. It is said that the Fislt 
Commission, under the management of 
General George Stone, is a great political 
machine. But compared with the highway 
commission proposed by Governor Gillett 
the Fish Commission, notorious as its politi- 
cal operations have become, would be insig- 
nificant. 

The people of California want to see a 
system of permanent highways constructed 
— of that there is little doubt. But before 
they vote upon the question they want to 
know not only how much money is to be 
expended, but they want to know definitely 
where the highways are to be built. And 
under any circumstances, they do not pro- 
pose to lend the financial aid of the state to 
such a thinly veneered project for the es- 
tablishment of a perpetual political ma- 
chine. 

<• + + 
A. Cyano^enized Comet 

The tail of the comet which was lost has 
been found again, without any fuss, which 
proves that it was not lost, but remained 
all the time in the relative position of the 
tails of Bo-peep's legendary sheep. We 
have felt all along that we were in no real 
danger from the unattached tail of a comet, 
but since the tail has been rediscovered in 
its proper place the danger to the earth 
seems to have increased. Cyanogen gas 
has been found in large amounts in the de- 
plorable tail of that comet by the Lick Ob- 
servatory folks. Their announcement of 
the fact was received with respectful si- 
lence on this side of the Atlantic, but it has 
caused consternation among the advanced 
scientists of England, who are always look- 
ing for trouble when they are not looking 
for spooks. 

We learn witih surprise that cyanogen gas 
is not nice, and if that cyanogenized comet 
tail sweeps the earth there may be trouble. 
The late E. A. Poe, whose fame we have all 
been belittling lately in order properly to 
celebrate the one hundredth anniversary of 
his birth, invented a stirring yarn of the de- 
struction of this globe by a comet, but he 



knew nothing at all about cyanogen gas. 
However, cyanogen gas, chemically com- 
bined with components of our atmosphere, 
might turn out to be beneficial and re- 
storative. They say that carbolic acid and 
camphor combined make a suave and heal- 
ing compound, though so great is our dis- 
trust of scientific assertions that we advise 
nobody to try it on a sore finger without 
first consulting an old-fashioned family 
physician. 

H. G. Wells, an English scientist of high 
standing, has foretold the regeneration of 
the world by the beneficent gases of a 
comet's tail, which is destined to lessen the 
woes of operatic impresarios, prima donnas, 
chief executives, and folks of that kind, and 
make all the humbler ones honest and 
brother-like. So we may as well wait 
cheerfully until the cyanogen gas arrives. 
♦ • # 

WorKingmen's Tenement' s in Germany 

Germany seems to the American to be 
dealing always with measures rather than 
men. But she is modern. There are cer- 
tain phases of modern thought upon which 
she has seized more readily than any other 
nation. She is making experiments in co- 
operation everywhere. She has societies 
for co-operative buying; co-operative tene- 
ments and apartment buildings for civil ser- 
vice officials ; and there are successful, if 
not old, co-operative industries capitalized 
and administered by the workers. The co- 
operative tenements in Berlin are better 
than ours in New York because they are 
more beautiful and pleasant ; but even more, 
it may be, to be desired, they are built with 
the co-operation of the State, instead of 
being philanthropic enterprise. In a few 
years after the industrial insurance laws 
went into effect the insurance fund had ac- 
cumulated to such proportions that the 
question of investing it was one of some 
embarrassment, and the promoters of the 
new measure looked about for a way of 
making this surplus further the same ends 
which the insurance aimed to further. It 
has gone for the most part into the sanator- 
iums which supplement the insurance proj- 
ect, and into the co-operative dwellings. 
Some of the buildings of the labor bureaus 
have also been put up through loans from 
it. The rate of interest is 3, Zy 2 or 4 per 
cent ; 3jA being half the current rate in Ber- 
lin last winter. 

All the plan of direction of these associa- 
tions is more socialized than anything we 
have as yet in America. It is only a little 
more so, but it is a little. A tenant in a 
typical one pays for his share at the rate of 
8 cents a week, his investment beginning at 
once to draw 4 per cent. He can not sell 
his apartment nor will it go further than his 
children, and all increase in value thus ac- 
crue eventually to the corporation, to be 
used in putting up new buildings. Every 
tenant must be a stockholder, and his hold- 
ing insures him the occupation of his 
apartment for life at the rent at which he 
takes it and for his children. Rents in Ber- 
lin have greatly increased in the last 
twenty years, and in the old buildings put 
up twenty years ago the tenants pay 30 per 
cent below the present rate. The stock- 
holders direct the affairs of the society, and 
get such training in administration as their 
experience offers. Gladstone laid his power 
to think clearly to the interminable debates 
at his father's table, and the annual meet- 
ing's of the co-operative building associations 
of Berlin must do a great deal for the Ber- 
lin workingman in this way.- 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



CHILE CON CARNE 



lint perhaps \ ou would 
rather wail un se< her. Here is im- 



A Lord and the Maoris. Hie Earl i I 

•it method 
i 

plied the 1 1 < ■ i 

han three Spc iker-. 

charming of men, 
and 1 irit> with all classes is very 

» ertiMr of \'ew 

land. In- won the support and sympathy of 
iue .mil s) mpathetic 
I le christ n who was born out 

1 1 ma. and the 
I by the S'galihuia tribe with 
all t' imary rites and ceremonies. 

After t'ne parture from New Zea- 

land the Maoris senl him an illuminated 
address in a wonderful native frame, and 
when, as a return present, his lordship -in; 
a big L'nion Jack, measuring twenty- 
five feet by twelve, they organized special 
dances and fete- for it- reception. 

What is a Gollywogg? — An interesting 

■ ■)" new- comes to us from Russia. An 

I in the Russian army likes goll) WOggS. 

We are told that although not yet five years 

ge, the small heir to the throne of Rus- 
sia is already colonel of several regiments 
of his father's army. But all these digni- 
ties lie lightly upon his shoulders, for the 
chief joy of his life is a huge gollywogg, 

5cd m blue and red. sent him from En- 
gland by Queen Alexandra. This, as a 
matter of fact, is the most treasured pos- 
session of the royal nursery, and. when the 
rights of m are questioned by his 

sister, the young colonel is not averse from 
using his fists in its defense. 



The Kaiser Fines His Guests. — The Ger- 
man Emperor is not above playing an occa- 
sional practical juke. ( )nce while with some 
guests on a hoar-hunt tramping through a 
wood, he met a rural policeman. ''My good 
fellow," said the Kaiser, "you seem to be 
very suspicious. Perhaps you think I 
haven't a license?" And from his pocket he 
produced the document, duly signed and 
stamped. "Now," he continued, "you had 
i ask all the other gentlemen for 
theirs." Not one of the part}- possessed a 
license, and each had to pay a hue before 
a magistrate. 



Five Shillings Instead of a Kiss. — Apropos 
■ if Lord Northcote's name being mentioned 
as a probable successor to Earl Grey in 
Canada, his lordship was once made curious 
use of while Governor-General of Australia. 
Strolling one night through an avenue of 
-<>ml>re trees to a friend's house to dinner, 
he was suddenly pounced upon by a maid- 
servant, who kissed him effusively and 
pressed a little parcel into bis hand. "Here's 
sausage for you. I can't come out tonight, 
as master has company." she whispered, and 
as mysteriously disappeared. When he got 
lo I Ik 1 house, be found one of bis servants 
loitering by the gate. "What are you doing 
here?" asked Lord Northcote. "I'm waiting 
for my sweetheart," the man stammered. 
"Where is she?" "In service here." "Ah. 
then T am right. Here is a sausage from 
your sweetheart, and she wishes me to tell 
von that she cannot come out tonight, as 
her master has company." Seeing that the 
man looked nervous, he added kindly: "She 



No Luck. \\ hen Mr ■ 

nl fon the St. Andrews link- he i- report- 
ed to have -aid to hi- caddie : "\\ ell. Angus, 
man. the winter will soon be here. You'll not 
get very much caddying to do in the winter." 
"\'a." replied \ n^ mily. "There's 

no muckle caddying here in winter. If it's 

i.iu. it- frost; if it's no' frost, it's 
snaw; if it's neither snaw or frost, it's rain; 
ami if it's fine it's sure to be the Sawbath." 



Coal by the Sack. — An enterprising 
dealer who opened a c< al and woi d yard re- 
cently on Macy street conceived the bright 
idea of getting up the French language that 

be might be able to talk the "lingo" of some 

of his patrons in the neighborhood. lie 

seemed to have faith that blench would 
carry one safely in any pollyglot crew. 
Arming himself with a cop) of "French in 
a Fortnight," be set to work to conquer the 

tongue of Moliere in less time than it takes 
to go from here to Havre by express boat 
and "limited" combined. The result was 
that when approached one day by a house- 
wife who demanded the price of a sack of 
coal, be replied : "Six-bits a la carte and 
seventy-five cents table de bote." 



An Invisible Sovereign. — ( hie of the best 
stories told by Lord Alverstone. the Lord 
Chief Justice of England, concerns a little 
loan which he once made to a needy friend. 
He lent the latter a sovereign and then bet 
another friend that be would one day get his 
money back. The second friend was very 
doubtful, however, and took the bet with 
alacrity. Some time afterwards Lord Alver- 
stone met the latter gentleman, who sarcas- 
tically inquired: "Well, have you received 

the money from poor R yet?" "No." 

replied bis lordship; "and I shall not press 
him, for I have received a letter from him 
which is worth the money." The letter read ' 
as follows: "As the date has arrived when 
the €1 has to be repaid, please find a postal 
order for that amount, for I'm banged if I 
can. — Yours, etc." 

* * * 

Tit-bits of Science 

The fullers' earth industry in Great Bri- 
tain is practically controlled by a combine, 
which intrusts the secret of its final prep- 
aration to less than half a dozen persons. 

A six-weeks-old baby at Jersey City, N. 
J., whose lears have turned to stone, is said 
to be only the eighth case of infantile ossi- 
fication in the history of the medical science. 

To nerfect the process of the Oxford paper 
used for Bibles recptired twenty-five years 
of steady work. The syndicate owning the 
formula" value it at over $1,000,000. 

* * * 

LARGE COLLECTION OF SEEDS 



Both Vegetable and Flower, Donated by Germain 
Seed Company 



Some time a"o Mr, Abbott Kinney presented 
the Venice Utah street school a one-acre tract of 
Ground. The school has 140 pupils and each pupil 
is c-onsiened n plot in the school Erarden. 

The Germain Seed Company of Los Angeles 
donated the school a large collection of vegetable 
and flower seeds and in addition to this offered 
cash prizes, which pre to be nresented to the three 
pupils having the best garden at the end of (he 
school term. 

The idea of the seed firm in doing this was to 
n.inrige the school warden idea, which, accord- 
ing to the most prominent educators ill the United 
States, is one of the best movements of late years. 



HIGH CLASS INVESTMENT 



R 

E 

S 

I 

D 

E 

N 

T 



MINES So FARISH 

REAL ESTATE AGENTS 
315 S Hill Street 



PROPERTIES 



B 

u 

s 

N 

E 
S 
S 



The OuLing Suit* 




"In the spring 
the young man's 
fancy lightly turns to 
thoughts" — like this. 

In anticipation 

o f which, \\ o 
h a v e arrangi d 
our plans to bet- 
ter meet the de- 
mand for outing 
clothing, both for 
niun and women. 

Drop in and sec 
us about it. 

Yours for Out- 
ing Suits a n d 
Boots. 



The Wm. H. Hoegee Co., Inc. 

238-40-42 SOUTH MAIN 
Main 8447 Home 10087 




CALIFORNIA 
GROWN 





Few people of any knowledge of the mag- 
nitude of the Seed Industry in California, 
where thousands of acres are tilled annu- 
ally to supply the markets of the world. 

NATIVE FLOWER 
SEEDS 

15 varieties, each of which would he a 
treasure to any grounds. They include the 
wonderful Matilija Poppy, by many con- 
sidered the queen of all flowers. Also the 
superb California Poppy, wdiose Spanish 
name is Copa de Oro (Cup of Gold). Send 
50 cents for 15 packets containing 15 vari- 
eties of California Flower Seeds and we 
will send them to you postpaid. The regular 
retail price of these is $1.35. 

General seed and plant catalog sent free 
on request. 

Germain 

SEED AND PLANT CO. 

Depf. 6 LOS AN6ELES, CALIFORNIA 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



Something of Its Policy 




A Picturesque Corner 

If there is one thing more than any other 
that man has done in Southern California, 
and has made a clean job of it, it is in build- 
ing beautiful and comfortable hotels. It is 
pretty generally known what nature has 
done to bring fame to Southern California 
and it is pretty well known what the sun- 
shine and invigorating combination of ocean 
and mountain air has done for it's people. 
But Southern California's most beautiful 
hotels are of modern construction and the 
fame thereof is just now beginning to be 
heard in distant lands. 

God's work in Southern California as else- 
where is perfect. When man does anything, 
however, on account of shifting standards, 
some of us put in a part of our spare time 
finding fault with it. And -one of the com- 
paratively easy things to do, apparently, is 
to find fault with a hotel. 

But here in Southern California, in Riv- 
erside to be exact, right among the orange 
blossoms and the fig trees and the flowers 
that bloom twenty-four hours a day all the 
year there is a hotel that was built and is 
operated along lines that puts the so-called 
human mind to queer shifts to find fault 
with it. 

The Glenwood Mission Inn at Riverside 
was built for a purpose. The purpose was 
to create a hotel property that would es- 
tablish a reputation worth while. And this 
reputation was to be world-wide and it was 
to include something of peace of mind and 
a great deal of comfort for the guest. And 
the Glenwood's guest was to be made happy 
that he might enjov himself. The Glen- 
wood was to be his home in all that the 
word home really means. 



of Glenwood Mission Inn 

So the Glenwood, in addition to the splen- 
did hospitality it extended it's guests, took 
on the proper amount of system and order. 
Quite naturally perfect order around a ho- 
tel, in an atmosphere of semi-tropic out-of- 
doors naturalness, when accompanied by 
meals that are made to eat and by beds that 
really are made to sleep in — and such meals 
and such beds the Glenwood gives — begins 
to give the weary traveler or sojourner at 
least a foretaste of that "peace that passeth 
understanding." 

Finally the Glenwood's reputation became 
established. It took some time, however, to 
establish it, it does seem to take a little time 
to establish a good reputation. At any rate, 
the Glenwood has come into it's own. And 
because Frank A. Miller, it's proprietor, 
operates on a basis of endeavoring to give 
every guest at his hotel the best time, in it's 
highest sense, that the guest has ever had. 
the Glenwood will continue to attract to 
beautiful Riverside, in increasing numbers, 
those people from over all the world who 
care for refinement, harmony and peace of 
mind in their hotel experience. 

* * * 

Stanton's Dread Chimera 

What is this dreadful state secret that 
Speaker Stanton is carrying around in the 
card-indexed confidential information files of 
his official inner consciousness? If Richard 
Hotaling were inclined to do irreverence to 
the Master in the manner' of the soliloquiz- 
ing crook-backed king of the same surname 
he might speak of the cryptic Stanton thus : 
"Now is the winter of our discontent made 
worse by this sacred son of Los Angeles : 



for all the clouds that lowr'd upon our 
state are in the deep bosom of Stanton 
buried. Now are our brows bound with 
funeral wreaths ; our noisy tongues tied up 
by Japan's threats ; our false alarms changed 
to warlike greetings ; our speeches to Roose- 
velt messages. Grim-visaged war hath 
shown his wrinkled front. And now, instead 
of cap'ring nimbly in the assembly chamber 
to the pleasing squawk of a Caminetti lute, 
he now is mounting, night-hag like,_ our 
backs, to fright the souls of fearful states- 
men." But what is it that Speaker Stanton 
cannot reveal to his fellow citizens? Why 
does he refrain from telling us the very 
worst? A burden shared is a burdened light- 
ened. Why should Speaker Stanton bear all 
the burden? Why should his soul suffer all 
the harrowing consequences of a state secret 
whose lightest word would freeze our young 
bloods, make all our eyes pop from their 
sockets, and our knotted and combined locks 
to part, and each particular hair to stand on 
end, like quills upon the fretful porcupine? — 
Town Talk. 



-^Z 4 ^* 



SoJroadway ' 5:f ^§|p|||p tf So. Hill Street 
A. FUSERTOT CO. 

New Wash Goods 

(A UR assortment of Spring tub fabrics 
^-" is unsurpassed in the city in points of 

Beauty 

Newness 

Extensiveness 



A special feature of the new line is the 
showing of 

BELGIAN HOP SACKING 

All pure linen, 46 in. wide, at $1.00 yard. 

This fabric is the latest New York craze 
for the construction of long coat suits that 
launder. The material is coarse and heavy 
but has a rich and lustrous finish. The 
colors are ultra fashionable and include: 
Beige, Cuir, Lilac, Ceil Delft, Vieux Rose, 
etc. 

Ask to see them. 



"Honesty 


n * * 

is rower 




Lack of business 




honesty is business 




suicide. Our desire 




is a reputation for 


: / ^ 


reliability and fair- 


iri r "*fc?E i 


ness. 




See our diamonds. 




1 « W: 


i 


gold jewelry, watch- 
es, clocks, silver- 
ware, cut glass. 




BRIG0EN& PETERSEN 

^ KFG. JEWELERS - 










brioXjEin and pederson 

Manufacturing Jewelers 
507 South Spring St. Los Angeles 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



Christian Science— Popular Misconceptions Corrected 



Written Especially for the Pacific Outlook by William £. Brown, C. S. B., California State Committee on Publication 



tie all 

11 iJ as there are many 

prin- 

e of them. 

In ihc fir-t place let it be said that 
H-e has absolutely 
nothing in common with hypnotism, 
mesmerism d, mental 

lit, faith cure or the 
Emmanuel movement. Hypnotism, 
stion, for they are one 
and the same in operation, is I 
nizeil as one of the m 

us in effecting crime in tin 
and age, proving that in its efficient 
application it docs not depend upon 
the moral status of the practitioner, 
nor d ration prohibit its use 

for nefarious purpo- 

Chri-tian Science on the other hand 
can only be used for good and the 
practitioner who, through his knowl- 
.\er of thought, at- 
tempts to use it for seln-h or debasing 
purposes loses the power to heal. 

ThcM results prove the unlikeness 
of the systems beyond doubt. Further- 
more hypnotism in its practice oper- 
ntly of the moral or 
spiritual nature of the patient, while 
on the other hand Christian Science 
can not cure the patient without im- 
proving him spiritually. 

Christian Science is a religion, the 
religion of Jesus Christ, and accom- 
- it- healing and redemptive 
work by the same method employed 
by Jesus and his disciples, thus ful- 
filling the scriptural promises as given 
in Mark 16:17, 18, '"and these signs 
shall follow them that believe — they 
shall lay hands on the sick and they 
shall recover," and again in John 
14:12. "He that bclieveth on. me the 
works that I do shall he do also." 

At this juncture some of the critics 
of Christian Science maintain that 
these commands were intended for the 
disciples only. This view is dispelled 
by the following command of Jesus 
in Matt. 28:19, 20, "Go ye therefore 
and make disciples of all the nations 
— teaching them to observe all things 
whatsoever I have commanded you." 

From the scriptural quotation it will 
■ i n that true belief must always 
(not may sometimes) be accompanied 
with the ability to heal the sick as 
well as reform the sinner. Inasmuch 
as the Christian Science interpreta- 
tion of Jesus' teaching does confer 
I his healing power, thus fulfilling the 
promises of the Master, it is conclu- 
sive proof thai it- interpretation is 
correct. An influence that comes into 
one's life cleansing him from all sin, 
healing him physically and morally, 
freeing him from the bondage of 
drugs, alcohol and tobacco, making 
him a consecrated follower of Christ 
Jesus, must be, and is divine. 



irinw-a 

isti 

i- ill their entirety. It be- 
ihat all his commands ai 
cecuted and that it is obligatory 
■ii .ill Christiana in 
them. It believe- that the command 

k i- inseparably 
nected with that to preach the Gospel. 

L'nlike the Emmanuel or Christian 
psychology movement, Christian Sci- 
ence does not segregate diseases into 
functional and organic classes nor 
does it find any Scriptural authority 
for concluding that the former class 
may be safely intrusted to God's care. 
but the latter class is so difficult that 
it is necessary to employ a physician. 
On the contrary, the Bible teaches the 
sity of wholly relying upon a 
knowledge of God for healing and re- 
demption. This point is emphasized 
in the record of Asa in II Chron. 16- 
12, who, "In his disease he sought not 
to the Lord, but to the physicians, and 
Asa slept with his fathers." 

Perhaps one of the most popular 
fallacies regarding the method of 
Christian Science is the idea that it 
ignores sin and sickness and that if 
one only thinks he is well he will be 
so. This misconception is, of course, 
based upon a total misapprehension of 
the teaching of Science and Health, 
the text book of {Christian Science. 
There is nothing in the book that 
could be distorted into such a con- 
clusion. Mrs. Eddy emphatically 
teaches that those who sin must suf- 
fer and that the only way to maintain 
spiritual and physical health is to 
overcome sin and spiritual ignorance 
in all its forms. Christian Science 
recognizes that sin and disease are 
very real to the sufferer and that they 
must be destroyed, not ignored. 

Probably the most misunderstood 
proposition of Christian Science is its 
teaching regarding the non-existence 
of matter. Many bitter and sarcastic 
criticisms have 'been hurled at what 
is supposed to be the theory of Chris- 
tian Science, but as a matter of fact 
is not. 

The statement "there is no matter," 
is not meant to convey the idea that 
all the objects in the world about us 
do not exjst nor that man has no 
body, but it is equivalent to saying 
that these are not material as they 
seem to be to the senses. 

The declaration "there is no mat- 
ter" only partially defines the Chris- 
tian Science doctrine, but when con- 
sidered as a consequent of its cor- 
relative statement, "All is Mind," its 
meaning immediately becomes ap- 
parent, i. e.. that what is generally 
called matter is but a misconception 
of mental ideas. 

It is a self-evident fact that Mind 
and matter as opposed entities could 
not exist, and since Mrs. Eddy has 
given forth her discovery of the Ail- 



by mpi. 

! Mind, many Natural Scientists 
have changed their view- regarding 
matter and agree with her that we 
'live in a thought world and that mat- 
ter does nol exist. 

Professor Wilhelm Oswald of the 
University of Leipsic, Germany, write- 
thus of matter: "Matter is a thin 

lit which we have const I UCti '1 
ir selves i ather imperfectly to 
represent what is permanent in the 
changes of phenomena." 

Professor Huxley tells us that the 
only world we know or can possibly 
know is a thought world. Professor 
I'iskc writes. "Apart from conscious- 
ness there are no such things'as color, 
form, position, or hardness and there 
is no such thing as matter." 

Among others who subscribe to this 
theory of matter are Professors 
Crookes, Lodge and iCurie, the latter 
being the famous discoverer of 
radium, 

Mrs. Eddy's statement that "All Is 
infinite Mind and its infinite manifes- 
tation," is strictly in accord with 
Scriptural teaching that God is all and 
there is none else. 

The proof that this premise is cor- 
rect and in accord with the teachings 
of Jesus is established in the healing 
and redemptive work accomplished by 
Christian Scientists. 

In this connection the Master said, 
"It is the Spirit that quickeneth; the 
flesh profiteth nothing: the words that 
I speak unto you, they are spirit and 
they are life." 

One of the weakest criticisms fre- 
quently heard is in regard to the 
charge for services made by Christian 
Science practitioners. It is sometimes 
said. that this practice is proof that 
Christian Science is not Christian, as 
Jesus and His disciples healed with- 
out charge. Such a view is wholly 
without foundation, as Jesus clearly 
taught "the laborer is worthy of his 
hire." In sending forth his disciples 
he commanded them "Provide neither 
gold nor silver, nor brass in your 
purses, nor scrip for your journey, 
neither two coats, neither shoes, nor 
yet staves: for the workman is worthy 
of his meat." Matt. 10:10. In I iCor. 
9:14, Paul says, "If we have sown 
unto you Spiritual things is it a great 
thing if we shall reap your carnal 
things?" "Even so hath the Lord or- 
dained that they which preach the 
gospel should live of the gospel." This 
is ample Scriptural evidence that those 
who receive health and holiness are 
to provide maintenance of those who 
bring the blessings. The only dif- 
ference between the practice of Jesus 
and his disciples and the Christian 
Scientists of today is in the manner 
of recompense. In those days the 
bringers of glad tidings were lodged 
and boarded. In our day the wage 
system prevails and the healer boards 



himself a much more m and 

i way. but the princip! 
i ec pense i emains thi same. 

If clergymen of various denomina- 
tions receive recompense for preach 
ing. and tin- i- righl and just, then 
why should not the Christian Scientist 
who both preaches and heals? In 
this connection, however, it is but 
in-i ti. state that while Christian Sci- 
makes a verj moderate charge 
for the time of the practitioner (for 
the benefits can never be paid for) no 
one i- denied help because he is un- 
able to pay. 

It has been said by the critics of 
Christian Science that its text book 
rosts too much, and yet its cost of 
$3.0(1 is not excessive as compared 
with text books of other sciences. As 
a matter of fact those who have pur- 
chased the book think the ceist in- 
significant. Ask the one who has, by 
the aid of the book, been raised to 
health from incurable disease, or re- 
deemed from the slavery to alcohol 
and drugs, and restored to the com- 
munity as a loving father and upright 
citizen, ask him if the book costs too 
much! Thousands of Christian Sci- 
ence families can testify that a copy 
of Science and Health in their home 
has saved them hundreds of dollars in 
doctor and medicine bills, to say noth- 
ing of the health, harmony, peace and 
security its teachings confer. 

It is self-evident that if all were 
convinced that Christian .Science is 
accomplishing what it claims, there 
would ibe no opposition, and yet the 
opportunity for conviction is open to 
all. 

Many feel that Christian Scientists 
worship Mrs. Eddy and that she ; s 
seeking personal adulation, etc. In 
reply to the first part of this criticism 
it can ibe said that Christian Scientists 
do not worship Mrs. Eddy, but they 
do in a large measure express their 
gratitude for the benefits received 
through her teachings. One who has 
been rescued from hopeless invalid- 
ism and bondage to sin would be less 
than human if he failed to feel grate- 
ful to his deliverer for such deliver- 
ance. 

Personal worship is eliminated in 
Christian Science and Mrs. Eddy has 
spoken emphatically on this point, 
constantly admonishing her followers 
to look to God for guidance and never 
to lean on personality. 

It is frequently asserted by critics. 
who know not whereof they speak, 
that Mrs. Eddy considers herself equal 
with Jesus. Such sacrilegious utter- 
ances can only be made by those un- 
familiar with the teachings of Chris- 
tian Science. Although Mrs. Eddy 
has. in spite of ridicule, opposition 
and abuse, built up an organization 
that has no parallel in history, meek- 



6 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



Hess and selflessness are her chief 
characteristics. 

In the preface to her book, Science 
and Health, Mrs. Eddy refers to her- 
self as a willing disciple awaiting the 
Mind of Christ. Elsewhere she ad- 
monishes her students to follow her 
only as she follows Christ. 

Repeated attempts have been made 
by the enemies of this Science to show 
that Mrs. Eddy received her knowl- 
edge of Christian Science from one 
Quimby. Time and time again this 
falsehood has been refuted with in- 
controvertible facts; and in 1883 this 
matter was settled by the Circuit 



Court of the District of Massachu- 
setts, who issued a perpetual injunc- 
tion against one Edward J. Arens who 
infringed Mrs. Eddy's copyrights, ana 
who set up as part of his defense that 
the copyright works of Mrs. Eddy 
were not original with her but had 
been copied from -manucsripts com- 
posed by Dr. Quimby. When the time- 
came for taking testimony, Arens 
gave notice that he would not put in 
any testimony; and when his attorne> 
was asked the reason, he replied in 
substance, "There is no evidence to 
present". 

In addition to this Mrs. Eddy agreed 
to stand the cost of printing and pub- 
lishing Dr. Quimby's manuscripts in 
order to expose the falsehoods of 



parties publically intimating that she 
had appropriated matter belonging to 
Quimby. The whole question of orig- 
inality was involved in, and disposed 
of by the legal decision referred to, 
and the fact that Mrs. Eddy is the 
discoverer and founder of Christian 
Science is now formulated as history, 
and acknowledged by encyclopedias, 
dictionaries, and biographical works. 
Dr. Quimby was an avowed mesmer- 
ist, and Christian Science and mes- 
merism are like polar opposites, and 
could not possibly proceed from the 
same source. 

While advanced thinkers in all ages 
have held fragmentary ideas akin to 
those of Mrs. Eddy, and employed 
similar modes of expression, the dis- 



covery of Christian Science belongs to 
her exclusively, and the Christian Sci- 
ence healing made possible by her dis- 
covery has not been practiced since 
the days of Jesus Christ. It was she 
who discovered the principle under- 
lying the practice of Jesus and his dis- 
ciples, and from this principle Mrs. 
Eddy evolved a scientific system of 
healing and redemption, susceptible 
of proof. 

Christian Science is daily proving 
that the teachings of Jesus are as vital 
and available today as they were in 
the first century. All kinds of sin and 
diseases, including those deemed in- 
curable, are being successfully treated, 
and proof of this can be obtained by 
any 'sincere seeker. 




Philander C. Knox 




THERE'S a new pilot making 
soundings on the bar. He is 
preparing to take a big ship 
with a great skipper out of port and 
start her on a long voyage. And he 
is going to make sure that the channel 
has not shifted and that the range 
lights and the buoys are in place, for 
he is a very careful pilot indeed, and 
although he is a little bit of a man he 
has a great brain, a quick eye and a 
steady hand. 

The new pilot is Philander C. Knox, 
Senator from Pennsylvania, selected 
to be Secretary of State in the cabi- 
net of William H. Taft. Pie has 
piloted many important things in the 
past, but nothing approaching the 
magnitude of the incoming adminis- 
tration, but those who know him well 
have no doubt that he will do the job 
well and. with that rare gift of his of 
seeming not to strive at all while he 
is at work. 

It is just eight years since this won- 
derful man, small of stature, conser- 
vative of mould, courageous in every 
fibre and cool in his mental processes 
as a mountain spring, came to Wash- 
ington, writes the Washington corre- 
spondent of the New York Herald. 
In that short time he has made more 
indentations on the face of govern- 
mental history than any other man 
except Theodore Roosevelt. 

"Gentlemen," said President Roose- 
velt at the White House one night, 
when he had called a conference of 
members of his Cabinet and his fam- 
ous "trust busters" to take into final 
consideration the things the Senate 
was about to do to the Hepburn rate 
bill, "I have also invited, to be present 
Senator Knox, because he is the man 
who is responsible for the important 
policies of my administration." 

"Knox," said Secretary Root, who 
has a pretty wit, and had just tossed 
aside a copy of Owen Wister's "Vir- 
ginian," which he had been glancing 
through, "I think you ought to make 
him smile wdien he says that." 

But what the President said was 
literally true. It was Senator Knox 
who perfected the trust legislation 



A Careful Pilot Secured for the Ship of State 

strate with him, got the Chief Execu- 
tive on the telephone. 



which was the first step in the great 
manoeuvre which came to an end with 
the rate bill. He had told the Presi- 
dent that there was almost enough 
law to curb the trusts. He had in- 
duced Congress to follow him and 
abandon the elaborate scheme which 
Representative Charles E. Littlefield 
and others had projected to fill doz- 
ens of pages with new legislation. 
Then he had gone ahead and proved 
in court his contention. 

He first blazed the way in the 
Northern Securities case. There had 
been great agitation in the Northwest 
over the consolidation by means of a 
holding company of the Great North- 
ern, the Northern Pacific and the Rock 
Island. (Complaints had been lodged 
with the President and these were 
turned over to Mr. Knox by the 
President with the request that he ex- 
amine the law and see if the combina- 
tion could be reached. Former At- 
torney Generals had informed the 
railroads that they were beyond the 
interference of the law. Mr. Knox 
looked into the matter and reported. 
In his opinion the Northern Securi- 
ties Company was illegal and could, be 
reached by the laws of the United 
States. "Then go ahead" was the or- 
der from the White House. 

And Mr. Knox went ahead. He did 
not blow a single trumpet. He did 
not send >for a single newspaper and 
advertise what he was about. But 
when the bill in equity was ready to 
be filed he sent out one night to the 
newspapers a short statement — all his 
statements are short and. to the point 
— that the Department of Justice was 
about to proceed against the North- 
ern Securities Company and expected 
to have it enjoined. 

Nobody got an advance tip. The 
wind that blew through Wall street 
the next morning when the market 
opened was high and disastrous but 
it was a zephyr compared with the 
gale that raged around the White 
House wlien Mr. Steele and others 
interested in ending the injurious rate 
war in the Northwest, men who knew 
the President -well enough to remon- 



There is no doubt that Mr. Roose- 
velt was a trifle disturbed. It was rep- 
resented to him that he had done 
something which would ruin all the 
financial interests concerned. So 
when Mr. Knox came in, while the 
telephonic disturbance was at its 
height, the President asked him to go 
to the instrument and talk to the en- 
raged financiers. 

The financiers were not only seri- 
ously disturbed, they were enraged, 
and they said some things to Mr. 
Knox and he said some things to 
them. Finally he said: "Well, re- 
member this; there is no stock ticker 
in the Department of Justice, and this 
suit is going on." 

The suit went on, just as Mr. Knox 
said it would, and was carried from 
court to court, until the Supreme 
Court of the United States wrote as 
the law of the land that holding com- 
panies in restraint of trade were il- 
legal. 

But later the men of Wall street, 
who cursed the little Attorney Gen- 
eral from Pittsburg, blessed, him 
when, at the outset of the campaign 
of 1904, he said, in announcing the 
further policies of the Department of 
Justice, "The administration does not 
purpose running amuck." 

It was Mr. Knox who took up the 
Herald's exposure of the Beef Trust 
and enjoined it. Cleverly he moved 
against that gigantic monopoly in an 
unexpected way. He not only at- 
tacked it for violating the Sherman 
Anti-Trust law, being in restraint of 
trade, but he attacked it for demand- 
ing and receiving rebates in violation 
of the Interstate Commerce law. 
Thus he was the great pioneer in giv- 
ing life and vitality to the war on the 
rebate, which subsequently, under 
administrators of the Department of 
Justice, became such a conspicuous 
feature of the war of the President on 
the octopus. 

It was Senator Knox who con- 
ducted what is perhaps the greatest 
and most complex legal investigation 



the world has ever known. He per- 
fected the title to the Panama Canal. 
Here was a law case which began in 
Paris and had its ramifications all 
through France. Then it reached 
New York, where another company 
had been formed. It included Wash- 
ington, where the title was subse- 
quently to rest. Then it went to 
Panama and thence over the moun- 
tains to far away Bogota. He car- 
ried it through and it is noted, that in 
all the recriminations concerning that 
transfer there is not a hint that 
reaches the skirts of tne man who 
brought the title to the canal from 
France and Central America to Wash- 
ington. 

It is also represented by the friends 
of Mr. Knox that while he was con- 
ducting the negotiations, which took 
him to Paris, he did not get along 
very well with William Nelson Crom- 
well . Somehow Mr. Cromwell, who 
tried to have a finger in the legal pie 
that the Attorney General was cook- 
ing, bored Mr. Knox. 

For good natured plain speaking the 
Secretary of State in the next Cabi- 
net is famous. After he had been 
elected to the Senate from Pennsyl- 
vania he called at the White House 
to see the President. 

"I want to know what you think 
of my new Attorney General," said 
the President. 

"Who is the new Attorney Gen- 
eral?" asked Mr. Knox. 

"Moody," replied the President. 

"Well, I'll ifollow Mr. Dtooley," said 
the Pennsylvanian. "Is Casey good 
for a drink?' asked the barkeeper of 
Hennessey. 'Has he had it?' asks 
Hennessey. 'He has.' 'He is.'" 

The White House women thought 
the story cruel, but when it became 
printed the country roared. 

Many times President Roosevelt 
used Mr. Knox to promote policies. 
He sent for the Senator from Pennsyl- 
vania when he had determined on ask- 
ing Congress to enact some law 
which would insure uniformity of 
railroad rates. Mr. Knox talked it 
over. He told the President how far 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



- 

lilcilt 

ch outlui- 

icinc- 

uly a 
lub that 

would like to 
leech. He knew 
burg : well that lie coin 

ch that Mr Knox made 
irerunner of the 

If the in. 
ned had 1m | im- 

ic re- 
sult would have been attained that 
plished after a strug- 
But the 
ay from his moor- 
md tiu- House and Senate got 
I they came hack 
it Mr. Knox had said in No- 
I late in May. and put through 
just the hill that he said ought to be 

It i> tile view of those who know 

the next Secretary of State intimately 

that Mr Taft could not have got an- 

nian who so nearly approached 

tary Root in those qualities that 

a President needs t" have close at 

if he had gone over the country 

from end to end with a searchlight. 

- there i- only one Root, so it 

1 there is only one Knox. Both 

are men of keen intellect. Both are 

ssed of a marvelous ability to 

work long stretches at a time, ffoth 

have a broad grasp, and both have the 

courage to tell a President when he 

i^ wrong. Both have done so many 

a time. In addition both have that 

great life saver for men who have to 

endure periods of stress and storm — 

a -nise of humor. 

In a great degree Mr. Knox has the 
respect of all who know him. He is 
a man of wealth and he made it all at 
the law. Everybody lias heard the 
story of Mr. Knox and the late Ben- 
jamin Harrison, who after his retire- 
men returned to Indianapolis to prac- 
i law. They were engaged on the 
side in a great lawsuit involv- 
ing the life of the street railway sys- 
tem of Indianapolis. When the case 
came up all the lawyers made very 
long addresses — that ' is, all but Mr. 
Knox. He spoke to the Court exact- 
ly forty minutes. His argument was 
as settling the case. When 
vas ended Mr. Knox approached 
General Harrison and politely offered 
the suggestion that they divide their 
fees. General Harrison rather brus- 
quely refused. Later it leaked out 
that the fee of General Harrison was 
$25.(100 and of Mr. Knox about $75,- 
000 

The next Secretary of State will be 
found by the diplomats with whom 
he comes in contact to be a \ ery red 

M led man. He delights in good 

horses. He loves to play golf, lie 
lives iii the summer in a beautiful 
home al Valley Forge, Pa., his home 
being the old house that was occu- 
pied by General Knox as headquar- 
during the War of the Revolu- 



luliful 

id a splcil- 

the 

simple life He ha> hi, horses and 

ds them to the 

neigh [| i> the retreat 

whenever Satur- 

'ling- 

nd fortunate, indeed, is he who 

ined under that quaint old 

■ the hard roads that ri?c and 
the hills around pic- 
turesque Devon and Paoli the Senator 

from Pennsylvania can be seen al- 
i very day in summer driving hts 
splendid team of fast trotters that 
Mill hold the n the fastest 

time in double harness. 

Mr. Knox at the present time is 
really William 11. Taft in all matter? 
bearing on the new administration. 
While the next President is at Pan- 
ama struggling with the problem of 
the lo.'k canal and the Gatun dam, 
Mr. Knox speaks for him in every- 
thing that is essential. It is a fine 
commentary on the broadness oi 
two men that they have been 
able to get together and that they 
should so thoroughly trust each other. 
Only a little more than eight months 
ago they were opponents for the re- 
publican nomination for the Presi- 
dency. 

Just as Cleveland took Thomas F. 
Bayard for his Secretary of State in 
1885 so Air. Taft has taken his prin- 
cipal opponent now and made him his 
chief confident. There is no secret of 
politics that Mr. Knox is not in pos- 
session of. So perfect is the reliance 
placed in him by the new President 
that Mr. Knox is the sole person now 
responsible for the members of the 
Cabinet yet to be chosen. He is set- 
tling the Cabinet problem for Mr. 
Taft. Before going to Panama Mr. 
Taft had Mr. Knox and Mr. Hitch- 
cock at Charleston, S. C, for a long 
conference. To Mr. Knox was given 
a list of names from which men to 
occupy the various posts yet unfilled 
were to 'be selected. He was to make 
an investigation, decide the individual- 
problems for himself and make a re- 
port to Mr. Taft on his return. 

Iii addition to this Mr. Knox is 
chairman of the joint committee of 
the Senate and House of Representa- 
tives on the Inauguration of the Pres- 
ident and Vice President. Thus he 
is the busiest man in the ' country. 
Now lie is in New York prosecuting 
his inquiries for Mr. Taft, now on his 
way to Chicago to do the same thing, 
now going to some other distant city 
to keep an important engagement, and 
now on the floor of the Senate offer- 
ing resolutions providing for the pay- 
ment of the inaugural expenditures or 
expediting his resolution fixing the 
Presidential succession in case of the 
death of a President-elect before the 
inauguration. 

And all the time he preserves that 
remarkable poise which is the admira- 
tion of all who know him. Good na- 
tured. gracious, modest, a good loser 
and an easy winner, lie seems to 
sprinkle sunshine wherever he goes. 
The Senators have felt the quality 



. debate In 
ISC I 

irgumcnts which 

Old ha- shown hull 

self hi him- 

self than many of those who have 

d in tile Senate from fifteen to 

Mr Knox w ill go into histOl 
the man who would rathe! 

for the Presidential nomina- 

m the bench of the Supreme 
Court of the United Si 

I in. i m he was sitting in the 

Belasco Theatre with his family en- 
the unusual neat of a matinee. 
\ messenger from the White House 
madly on a bicycle to the Sena- 
tor's residence in K street. There 
learning that Mr. Knox was at the 
re the messenger asked for or- 
ders. 

"(,,i gel him out of there and say 
the President desires to see him im- 
mediately," were the instructions. 

So the messenger bolted into the 
theatre and disturbed the Senator in 
the midst of a hearty laugh. Much 
wondering, Mr. Knox excused him- 
self and walked across to the White 
House, only a block distant, and en- 
tered the Cabinet room. 

"Senator," exclaimed the President, 
"Justice Brown has just resigned, I 
send for you to offer you that place 
on the Supreme Bench. 

"Thank you very much, Mr. Presi- 
dent, but I do not desire to go on the 
Supreme Bench." 

And from that minute Mr. Roose- 
velt knew that, come what might, Mr. 
Knox would be a candidate for the 
republican nomination for President 
in 1908 against William H. Taft, and 
he began to prepare for it. 



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OCEAN PARK, CAL. 




PACIFIC OUTLOOK 




The fabled Titans are said in their, 
wars to have tossed and rent the land 
into every possible contortion and to 
pile mountain upon mountain in their 
attempt to scale heaven. It may 
have been one of these conflicts that 




Looking Up the Track to Echo 
Mountain 

produced the eruption that threw into 
place the great range of rock and 
granite we call the Sierra Madres of 
Southern California. 

The desire to climb one of these 
alluring peaks, takes possession of 
every visitor to California and we hail 
with joy the news that not only may 
Mahomet go to the mountain, but in 
one sense has the mountain been 
brought to Mahomet. The Pacific 
Electric Railway Co. has made it pos- 
sible for every one to visit the tri- 
crested peak of Mt. Lowe, and a trip 
to its summit is a fitting finale to all 
trips of Southern California. It is not 
alone the fact of attaining a height of 
more than six thousand feet, it is the 
wonderful and varied series of mov- 
ing pictures that greet the eye in mak- 
ing the ascent. So abosrbed is one 
in these indescribable scenes, that the 
remarkable work of engineering 
which carries him to the top, comes 
as an afterthought. 

The mountain itself is one of the 
Sierra Madres, and is named for Prof. 
T.C.S. Lowe of Pasadena. Prof. Lowe 
made the first trip to the summit, 
planted the first American flag on its 
highest point, and later conceived the 
project for making a way for others 
to enjoy the beauties and grandeur of 
the mountains. There are sentimental 
people who oppose mountain railways, . 
but fortunately Prof. Lowe was not 
one of them, and as the result of his 
thought we have the Mt. Lowe rail- 
way, which surpasses all other moun- 
tain railways as a piece of mechanical 
engineering and for the variety and 



magnificence of its views, — not ex- 
cepting the world renowned railways 
of the mountains of Switzerland. 

The trip from Los Angeles is made 
in about two hours from the Pacific 
Electric station. The road takes us 
through busy Main street, on through 
the less populous parts of the city, 
past the cities of Highland Park, Gar- 
vanza and the Cawston Ostrich Farm; 
then through Pasadena, a gem-like 
city at the base of the Sierra Madre 
range, through Altadena with its 
shaded avenues and beautiful homes, 
on to the very foot of the stately grey 
mountains. Then the track begins to 
wind among the rocks, skirting the 
sharp sides of the canyons, up and up 
until we are in Rubio Canyon, 2200 
feet above the sea . 

Rubio Canyon is one of the most 
fertile and picturesque of the many 
canyons and is well worth a visit, but 
one who has started for the summit is 
wholly interested for the time, in the 
car waiting to take him up the incline. 
He looks up the track, — it looks a 
long way to the top. When the road 
was under consideration, this steep 
ascent between Rubio Canyon and 
Echo Mountain, a precipitous rise of 
1300 feet, looked like an impossible 
place to bridge, but the difficulty was 
overcome by the cable line which 
wonderful piece of railroad engineer- 
ing made the whole trip possible. The 
incline is more than 3000 feet in 
length with a grade that in some 
places is 62 feet in one hundred. The 
wonder of this piece of engineering 
and the means by which it is made 
safe, comes to the mind later, for as 



are miles of foot and bridle paths ra- 
diating from this point. On a slope is 
located the Lowe Observatory, main- 
tained by the Pacific Electric Com- 
pany, and in charge of Prof. E. Lar- 
kin, a competent astronomer. On the 
Power House with its equipment of 
machinery, is the Columbian search 
light with the great lens the rays of 



more rugged with one side compara- 
tively bare; the northern slopes are 
clothed with thick forests of live oaks 
and giant pines, green with moss. 

We pass Cape of Good "Hope, a 
bold promontory of granite; Horse 
Shoe curve; Devil's Slide, where at 
one time a small avalanche swept 
down the mountain side; and iCircular 




Where the Road is Hew 

which can be seen for more than a 
hundred miles at sea. 

From Echo Mountain to Mt. Lowe, 
a distance of five miles, the trip is 
made by electric car. In these five 
miles the road climbs 1500 feet per- 
pendicularly and much of the road 
is hewn out of the solid granite. It is 
five miles of thrills, without an equal. 
The road climbs up the sides of the 
mountain in curves, — at one point, 




Each Time the 

the car rises, and one looks down into 
the depths of Rubio Canyon, with its 
rich verdure, trees, ferns, and flowers, 
and the mountain stream sparkling on 
its way to the sea, he forgets that 
there is such a thing as machinery. 
He does not realize that he crosses a 
bridge 200 feet long, 120 feet higher 
at one end than at the other. 

Echo Mountain is 3S00 feet above 
the sea. Besides its superb view, it 
offers many points of interest. There 



View is Larger 

eight different views of the track be- 
ing visible. At times we seem to hang 
in mid-air as we can see nothing be- 
low us but a yawning chasm hun- 
dreds of feet down. We look ahead 
at an impassable wall of granite and 
while we are wondering how they get 
through it, we are shot into mid-air 
again on a shelf of the mountain side. 
Each time the view is larger, the 
scene grander and the earth appar- 
ently gone. The mountains become 



,-n Out of Soud Granite 

Bridge, where the track swings round 
a spur of the mountain making a 
circle of 400 feet with a diameter of 
150 -ieet. It is a remarkable piece of 
engineering and the views of the can- 
yon and chasm make one fairly gasp 
for breath. Just beyond Circulai 
Bridge, the road enters Grand Can- 
yon and we look down into a vas' 
cleft 3000 feet deep. We lose for r 
time the vista of valley, plain and 
ocean and are surrounded by great 
pines that lift their heads towards the 
bit of blue sky visible above. The 
scene changes as we pass along, — first 
turning to the south, then to the west 
and then to the north, — swinging 
along the steep side of the rugged 
mountain, through great forests, 
growing more luxuriant as we ascend. 
The whole journey is thrilling and 
our pulses are still throbbing with 
pleasure and excitement when the car 
makes its last turn and we arrive at 
"Ye Alpine Tavern." Samuel John- 
son long ago said "There is nothing 
which has yet been contrived by man 
by which so much happiness is pro- 
duced as by a good tavern." Old 
Samuel Johnson himself would have 
been delighted with the quaint Swiss 
architecture of this tavern, set in a 
beautiful glen, protected from the 
winds of winter and from the heat of 
summer. Great trees of oak and of 
pine make music around it, and afford 
a home for the birds and the squir- 
rels. Giant ferns of every variety add 
their beauty to the canyon. There is 
no noise of traffic, no suggestion of 
the "maddening crowd's ignoble strife." 
As we enter the Inn, we feel at once 
its welcoming hospitality and Samuel 
Johnson would surely recognize the 
old English motto over the fireplace, 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



cut of .1 I 

en ii 
ju>t such 

ivem where he met fellow 
! and phil 
.ind to tell 

t the Alpti 

.ne. I 
'. wide and t higl 

. it. the lirc 
burning brightly in tin- fin . 

• i th< 
.inn chair< itmos 

ind comfort and| 
Full of wel 

The tavern will accommodate IS 

and comfortable, arc pr, 

■\ ho prefer to sleep outside 
a is modern in every re 
well furnished, the furni- 
ture harmonizing with the architec 
turc. There is a large dining room 
with most excellent tabic, supplied 
with cold, crystal water direct from 
the mountain springs. Mr. II. B 
Brown, the genial manager, (iocs not 
ttble in appearance the original 
"mine host of ye Alpine tavern", but 
the long pipe hangs liy the fn ' 
and sword and bucksins won!, 
add to the welcome he extends nor 
to the attention given to the comfort 
and pleasure of the guests. The tine 
service, excellent cuisine and general 
comfort of the modern apartments 
appeal to many who linger for weeks 
in this delightful atmosphere. 
"Oh souls of poets dead and gone. 
What Elysium have ye known 
Happy fields or mossy cavern, 
Choicer than "Ye Alpine Tavern?" 

There are many fascinating trails 
from the Inn. hut the grandest is the 



■ ■in whole 
In one direction lie* tin 
aide S 

1... .k 



In Pictikesque Rubio Canyon 
ing like a great colored checker board, 
and the cities of Pasadena and Los 
Angeles mere spots in the midst with 
a background of mountains ever 
charming and glorifying the land- 
scape. Across the plain we see the 
ceaseless breakers of the Pacific roll- 




yk Ai.i'ink Tavern 



three mile climb to the summit, 15(10 
feet higher. The journey is usually 
made by burros, but many prefer to 
walk the trail, and the glorious views 
are ample reward. Every foot is 
thrilling, full of interest, with splen- 
dor after splendor as we go on and 
up until it seems as if we must reach 
the great white cumulus cloud thai 
hangs just above the peak, or "take 
ship and sail up into heaven." But 
finally we reach the summit from 
which point it looks as if the whole of 
California were spread out before us. 



ing in upon the sand. The ocean it- 
self is glistening in the sunlight, so 
dazzling that the eye turns for rest to 
the beautiful valley near the hills of 
San Rafael; beyond them lies the 
range of Verdugo, the fertile valley 
of La Canada and we look on to 
where the higher peaks of the Sierras 
touch the sky. "Nature can no fur- 
ther go". 

It would be a delight to stay at Ye 
Alpine Tavern indefinitely and ex- 
plore the mysteries and beauties of 
the craggy chasms, great canyons, 



and -nit if the 

■ h.i^ ..nl\ ..in- day to c 

but the trip t.. Ml Lowe, the mon- 
arch o a Madres. 
+ + + 




HIT OR MISS 



Tile \rl> 

Saturday will begin with a pa 
tig from the City li.ill al 

p, in and disbanding al 

ind Se\ • mi. stn ets. \i tin. | oint the 

ipants will take the elcctrii 
to Sunset Park 

w ill unite in tree planting. The 
standing committees ol the year are 
nade up of !■'. W. Blanchard, Dr \. 
W. Lamb, Russ Avery, Dr. I'.. J. Har- 
per, .1. (, Morley, F, I. Alles, J. M. 
Guinn, Mrs. Rodman, Mrs. Chalmers 
Smith, Jos, Scotl .in.] Dr. Jones of 
'he Library Board. 

A meeting of the Arbor Day Asso- 
ciation was held List Tuesday when 
Prof Alliot spoke among others. He 
wisely urged that trees be cared for 
after planting. There is something 
cruelly irresponsible in offering a 
sightly life to a tree and then letting 
it vainly perish for lack of a little 
water, even if water be, in this our 
land, a commodity defiled by price. 



In last Sunday's issue of the L. A. 
Herald Mr. F. W. Blanchard won the 
first prize in the photographic contest. 
This will never do. Mr. Blanchard 
will have to rent a studio in his own 
building and pay himself honor in 
monthly installments. When the pa- 
trons of art begin to win the first 
prizes wdiat is the devil of a poor art- 
ist going to do? This is certainly the 
last agony of art. If congress won't 
give us free art importations the least 
we can expect of Mr. Blanchard is 
free studios. The fourth floor front 
is not unworthy of our skill. We do 
Decalcomania tidily. 



• Clifford Richmond was in the city 
for a few days this week. He is well 
known among craftsmen and to the 
general public more particularly for 
his gentle satire of Elbert Hubbard in 
the skit called, "Me and Mozart" 
which came out a few years ago. Mr. 
Richmond is a manufacturer of East 
Hampton, Mass. This is his first visit 
to the Pacific coast. It is not impos- 
sible that he may eventually come out 
here to live. 



Several interesting articles were ex- 
hibited at the Friday Morning Club 
on Colonial tD'ay which came last 
Tuesday. Among other rare relics 
Mrs. I. B. Bond showed a tea pot of 
1796 that was potted at Isleworth by 
Shure and Goulding. They worked 
from 1760 to 1823. At the death of 
Goulding all of the china was stored 
for thirty years. This piece of bas- 
relief came from a wealthy Spanish 
family in the city of Mexico. A simi- 
lar tea pot was destroyed in the San 
Francisco earthquake. 



Phones: Hi 

i M.iin 1 Ml 9 

G. G. JOHNSON 

Investments and Loans 
Insurance 

212 II. W. i 

' I . 'in ill .Mid Spun 

I. n- Angeles, I i 



Long-headed investors are 
buying Los Angeles realty 
now. No better time to buy 
will ever again occur — prices 
are low, big things are doing 
and the future big increase 
in values certain. Be pru- 
dent 

Be wise 
Buy now 

and when the big activity 
comes, which is already in 
sight, let some one pay you 
your 

big profit 

No better opportunity offers 
than the 

$650.00 

lots in the THREE G Tract 
on Vermont Ave. Fine soil 
all ready for garden or lawn. 
Class A sidewalks and curbs. 
Streets graded, oiled and wa- 
ter in front of every lot. 

Terms: $50 Cash, 

balance $10 

monthly 

New houses going up in 
tract. Certain big improve- 
ments now under way are 
sure to make these lots 
double in value in the very 
near future. 

See us quick. 

G. M. GIFFEN 

Agent and Owner 

111 Merchants' Trust Bldg. 
207 So. Broadway 
A 1569; M 3110 
Member L. A. R. B. 



10 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK 



AMUSEMENTS 



"A Chinese Honeymoon" 
Ferris Hartman and his merry band 
are appearing at the Grand this week 
in "A Chinese Honeymoon", by 
George Dame and Howard Talbot. 

Ferris Hartman assumes the role of 
Samuel Pineapple satisfactorily. His 
humor is clean cut and not over- 
drawn. Joseph Fogarty makes the 
Emperor imposing. Emil Kruschke 
as Chipper Chap is excellent, his 
make-up being remarkable. Waller 
de 'Leon did not improve his pleasing 
appearance by plastering his hat on 
one corner of his head. Next to Mr. 
Hartman. the interest of the audience 
was centered on Christine Nielsen 
who appeared as Soo-Soo, the Em- 
peror's niece. She was in excellent 
voice and her solos were effective. 
One can easily forgive Miss Nielsen 
for marring her pretty features .with 
a feverish make-up when her irresis- 
tible smile appears. "Muggins" Davies 
as Fi Fi scored a hit. Her English 
accent took with the audience. 

Taken as a whole the performance 
went well. Whoever was responsible 
for the clever decorations in the lobby 
of the theatre, deserves a medal. 
Chinese lanterns were strung from' 
the ceiling and walls, making a charm- 
ing picture, and the air was redolent 
with fumes of Chinese incense. It is 
noticed since John H. Blackwood as- 
sumed the management of this house, 
that the performances are attracting 
a better class of patrons. 



Auditorium 

Manager Crawford again presented 
to the patrons of this magnificent 
theatre the gorgeous spectacular pro- 
duction, "Ali Baba and the Se\'en 
Thieves." It played to packed houses 
last week and it is still popular. 

Last week's favorites still hold 
forth, dainty Olga Stech, stately Maud 
Beatty, comedians Onslow, Arbuckle, 
Reed and Sellar. The chorus shows 
marked ability under the skillful hand- 
ling of Miss Leslie. It is a perform- 
ance well worth seeing, even if only 
from a spectacular standpoint. 



• "A Texas Steer" 

Lewis S. Stone and the Belasco 
Theatre Stock Company are present- 
ing before capacity houses this week 
Charles Hoyt's well known satire on 
political life, "A Texas Steer". There 
is no question of its popularity. 

Lewis S. Stone is well cast as Mave- 
rick Brander, handling his lines with 
his usual easy skill. Charles Ruggles 
as Capt. Fairleigh Bright is good, 
while Howard Scott as Col. Brassy 
Gall is excellent. The rest of the 
male roles are in capable hands. 

Florence Oakley makes a winsome 
Bossy. Some of her mannerisms re- 
mind one of Flora Walsh, Chas. 
Hoyt's first wife, who, if memory 
serves us right, was the original 
Bossy. 

Special mention must be made of 
Tda Lewis who was capital in the 
character of Mrs. Brander. Beatrice 
Noyes looked charming and played 



the role of Dixie well, while Jessie 
Norman as Mrs. Campbell made as 
much as could be expected of a small 
part. 



Engaging "Marrying Mary" 

Florence Gear in "Marrying Mary" 
was the attraction at the Majestic this 
week. Miss Gear made a favorable 
impression here last season in "Cupid 
at Vassar." Her present vehicle, in 
which Marie Cahill starred three 
years ago, is a musical comedy by Ed- 
win Milton Royle and Silvio Hein. 

Undaunted by three previous matri- ' 
monial mishaps, the dainty divorcee, 
"Marrying Mary," engages herself, 
for the fourth time, to Ormsby Kul- 
pepper, vice-president of the Anti- 
(DSvorce League. He is blissfully 
ignorant of "Miss Montgomery's" 
past until her three cast-off husbands 
appear. A series of absurd complica- 
tions follows. One by one his pre- 
decessors reveal themselves to Kul- 
pep'per, who despairingly exclaims, 
"It's a syndicate!" All of 'Mary's 
matrimonial knots are finally un- 
tangled except her last and happiest, 
and the curtain falls upon amicable 
relations between her numerous has- 
beens and would-bes. 

Miss Gear scored a hit, playing a 
somewhat worldly role with finish and 
aplomb. She is graceful, alive to the 
finger-tips, and charmingly gowned. 
Hre mannerisms are as fetching as 
they are meant to be; and not even 
her marked affectation of pronuncia- 
tion can mar one's pleasure in her 
really good voice. Richard Karl as 
Colonel Kulpepper, formerly played 
by Eugene Cowles, found favor with 
the audience. 

While .Miss Gear was on the stage, 
ginger and go were not lacking, but 
there was a noticeable let-down in her 
absence. The performance is too de- 
pendant upon the star's personal 
charm to be well-rounded. If the 
minor parts were given the attention 
they deserve, and the chorus re- 
juvenated, "Marrying Mary" would 
develope into entertainment of the 
first rank. As it is, it is tuneful and 

diverting. . 

"Girls" 

Clyde Fitch's latest comedy, "Girls", 
received a deservedly warm reception 
at the Mason this week. "Girls" is 
comedy at its best, human, breezy and 
as he declines to leave by the door, 
to her theatrical manager. Holt, 
clean, with unflagging interest and 
lines that scintillate. Its basic idea 
is not new, but the Fitchian ingenuity 
presents it in entertaining guise. We 
have had numerous young women in 
fiction who were so wedded to their 
independence as not to care about be- 
ing loved. The three bachelor girls 
around whom the entire plot of the 
play revolves are variations of this 
type. 

The first scene is evening in their 
studio, where' the shadow of a man 
has never crossed their window shade 
because, under the leadership of 
Pamela Gordon, they have sworn over 
crossed hatpins to renounce the oppo- 
site sex. The makeshifts of their 
light housekeeping are rich meat for ■ 
humor, as is the half-hearted manner 



A PEEP INTO THE OFFICES OF 



The Bolton Printing Co. (inc.) 




CSV ~Z ™ 

p a a 
p 8 1 

M ? 3 

j m iM liMI 3 



-' 1: 

BBS 

S H 
1 E 




Located in the Pacific Electric Building at Sixth and 
Main Streets, Los Angeles, California 

The business was organized three years ago, and was recently in- 
corporated with William Paris Bolton as president and general 
manager. 

A prominent feature of its invitation for patronage is the trite 
"Rush Orders a Specialty, Accuracy a Habit." That the public does 
read advertising has been proven to those closely identified with 
handling the product of the Bolton Printing Company, as witnesseth 
the emphasis placed on the company's slogan on those rare occasions 
when tardy delivery or other human frailty has crept in. 

Living up to this motto, which means — To deliver work on time 
and have it right — has resulted in the years of growth. 

Its enlarged equipment of today enables the handling of all classes 
of commercial printing, facsimile letter work, and brochure printing 
with most satisfactory results. 



J. E. MEYER 

Stocks, Bonds and Investments 

Broker and Dealer in 

HIGH GRADE SECURITIES 

202 Mercantile Place 

at Spring St. 



NEVER GET LOST. 



M. E. KELLEY 



...Gowns. 



Room 52 Walker Theatre Bldg. 
South Grand Avenue 




PICTORIAL AVTO 

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GARAGE AND POWTS OF INTEREST 
FOR SALE BY DEALERS OR. SEND TO 
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